Search Results: extradition (19)

Photo: Cannabis Culture
Marc Emery, the Prince of Pot, might not be seeing much more cannabis for awhile if a novel legal maneuver doesn’t work.

Supporters of B.C. marijuana activist Marc Emery, the Prince of Pot, are trying an unconventional legal maneuver to stop his planned extradition to the United States — keeping him in Canada to face charges there first.

In a little-known quirk of Canadian law, individuals can swear criminal charges against another person or group. In recent years, such private prosecutions have been used by activist groups to take corporations to court.
Patrick Roberts, a resident of West Kootenay, B.C., used the tactic five years ago when he filed conspiracy charges against Emery, in relation to his mail order marijuana seed business.

Photo: The Globe and Mail
Marc Emery, the Prince of Pot, might not be taking another bong rip for awhile.

​Two Vancouver MPs are criticizing a decision to support the extradition of marijuana activist Marc Emery, the self-styled “Prince of Pot,” to the United States.

The Prince of Pot has been out on bail for the past six months. With the period of his release expiring, Emery surrendered himself to authorities Monday at the Vancouver courts.
Emery was arrested in 2005 as part of a joint Canada-United States law enforcement operation. He was charged in connection with an alleged online marijuana seed-selling business based in Vancouver, British Columbia, reports Stephen Thomson at the Vancouver Straight.

He doesn’t want it to go the way of the casinos.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

Magician and legalization supporter Penn Jillette talked to Marijuana Business Daily:

“What I’m really hoping for is that the marijuana industry can keep its funk.

“When Nevada first started with gambling, even though it was illegal, even though it was all very, very shady, there was a certain kind of individuality and honesty. Then, in the ’80s, corporations really took over Vegas and it got very homogeneous and very mall-style in general and McDonaldized.

Hossein Nayeri.


Hossein Nayeri, one of three suspects charged in the gruesome torture and sexual mutilation of a Newport Beach, California medical marijuana dispensary owner, will be arraigned today at Orange County’s Superior Courthouse.
The last of the defendants to be charged, Nayeri fled to his native Iran, which has no extradition treaty with the United States, but authorities were able to lure him to the Czech Republic, where they arrested him. He’ll now stand trial for kidnapping and cutting off the penis of the man he was trying to rob.

You have probably heard by now that the state of Colorado harvested over five million dollars in the first five days of legal recreational marijuana sales. The 25% tax imposed on those sky-high sales figures will surely be welcomed by all as the funds begin to flow back into their communities.
The implementation of this much needed cannabis reform seems to have opened a lot of eyes, and gained a lot of support from everyone, it seems, except for out-of-touch politicians and “fat and lazy” pundits. Oh, and Mexican narcoterrorist drug cartels.

Huffington Post
A fanatical supporter of “Prince of Pot” Marc Emery has been arrested for repeated death threats to Emery’s federal prosecutors

An unhinged Canadian man with a diaper obsession has been charged with sending a series of death threats to federal prosecutors in Seattle just before “Prince of Pot” Marc Emery’s extradition to the United States to face marijuana charges.

Paul George Cartier, 50, has “a history of other threats,” according to the U.S. Secret Service, reports Keegan Hamilton at the Seattle Weekly, including once having mailed a letter to the White House containing white power labeled “anthrax.”
Emery, the B.C.-based marijuana seed millionaire, pleaded guilty in 2008 to exporting cannabis seeds to the U.S. After having been indicted in Seattle, Emery almost worked out a deal under which he could have served his time in a Canadian prison, but when that fell through, the feds were busily working to get the Prince of Pot on the American side of the border.

University of New Haven
The simplify the process for cops (who, as we know, need for things to be as simple as possible), Coyle and her team developed a “collection card” Officers can rub a bud onto a card, then mail it to UNH’s lab.

​A new marijuana DNA database can tell if a particular batch of cannabis is one of more than 25 types that have been genetically mapped by a forensic botanist in Connecticut.

DNA analysis has almost unlimited potential in helping patients and breeders — once it’s used for that purpose, instead of to bust us.
But before you get too pumped about this exciting new service, I should point out that word “forensic” in botanist Heather Coyle’s job description. That’s right, this DNA analysis is meant to benefit cops and federal agents, not cannabis patients or breeders.


Sign These 11 White House Petitions Today!

Welcome to Room 420, where your instructor is Mr. Ron Marczyk and your subjects are wellness, disease prevention, self actualization, and chillin’.

Worth Repeating

By Ron Marczyk, R.N.
Health Education Teacher (Retired)

(Editor’s note: Major props to Morgan Fox over at Marijuana Policy Project, who, as I was preparing Ron Marczyk’s post, published MPP’s list of petitions to sign, here.)

That’s right, from the comfort of your living room, you can have green petition party, punctuated with bong rips if you so desire.
If this community can get all 11 of these petitions maxed out with signatures, it’ll help put medical cannabis issues on the table for the 2012 Presidential race.
Click on the name of each petition to go to the White House page where you can vote for it.

Jodie Emery
Jodie Emery and her imprisoned husband Marc at Yazoo City Medium Security Prison in Mississippi, July 4, 2011

​More than 5,000 people have signed an official White House petition for President Obama to pardon Canadian “Prince of Pot” Marc Emery, who is serving a five-year federal prison term in the United States.

The White House recently launched its “We The People” website for Americans to submit petitions on any issue. The Obama Administration initially set the threshold at 5,000 signatures within 30 days in order to get a formal response.
After overwhelming response, including numerous petitions to legalize cannabis, the White House announced on October 3 that it was upping the threshold fivefold to 25,000 signatures, but said that petitions which had already gotten 5,000 or more signatures before the announcement would still be included.
The official White House website called it “a good problem to have.”
“Planning for the new We the People platform, we were confident the system would ultimately get a lot of use, but we expected it would take a little longer to get out into the ether and pick up speed,” reads an October 3 post by Macon Phillips on whitehouse.gov.

Photo: Mike Siegel/Seattle Times
Former U.S. Attorney John McKay is sponsoring a drive to legalize marijuana for adults in Washington state.

​Marc Emery’s Prosecutor Switches Sides; Joins ACLU, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, and TV Host Rick Steves in Backing Inititiave

The former U.S. Attorney for Seattle who prosecuted “Prince of Pot” Marc Emery said Tuesday that he is sponsoring an initiative to legalize and tax marijuana in Washington state. John McKay, who spent five years enforcing federal drug laws, said he hoped the measure would help “shame Congress” into ending cannabis prohibition nationwide.

McKay, who was fired by the Bush Administration in early 2007, told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the laws criminalizing marijuana are destructive because they create a black market fueling international drug cartels and crime rings, reports Gene Johnson.
“That’s what drives my concern: The black market fuels the cartels, and that’s what allows them to buy the guns they use to kill people,” McKay told the AP. “A lot of Americans smoke pot and they’re willing to pay for it. I think prohibition is a dumb policy, and there are a lot of line federal prosecutors who share the view that the policy is suspect.”
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