Search Results: garcia (42)

Captain Trips was a majestic conduit of pure Being when he played the guitar. He wove soaring, wailing sonic explorations of space and time, heartache and joy which took ecstatic Deadheads along for the ride.

Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead could take the ineffable, the wordless and express it with breathtaking eloquence and sensitivity and nuance. When Uncle Jerry plugged in, he didn’t just plug into an amp. He plugged into Godhead itself.

He was born in San Francisco on August 1, 1942. August 9 will mark the 15th anniversary of his death in 1995.

Happy Birthday and Thank You, Jerry!

freedmanpodiumKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Andrew Freedman is moving on from his position as Colorado’s Director of Marijuana Coordination, Governor John Hickenlooper announced on January 5.

Freedman will still be involved with the cannabis industry and constructing policy: He’s launching a consulting firm, Freedman & Koski LLC,¬†which will advise state and local governments on the implementation of marijuana legalization. (The firm’s website is already live, and packed with pot info.)

After working as Lieutenant Governor Joe Garcia’s chief of staff from 2011 to 2013, Freedman became the campaign director for Yes on 66: Colorado Commits to Kids; from there, Hickenlooper hired Freedman to head up the state’s marijuana coordination office.

freedmanpodiumKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Andrew Freedman is moving on from his position as Colorado’s Director of Marijuana Coordination, Governor John Hickenlooper announced on January 5.

Freedman will still be involved with the cannabis industry and constructing policy: He’s launching a consulting firm, Freedman & Koski LLC,¬†which will advise state and local governments on the implementation of marijuana legalization. (The firm’s website is already live, and packed with pot info.)

After working as Lieutenant Governor Joe Garcia’s chief of staff from 2011 to 2013, Freedman became the campaign director for Yes on 66: Colorado Commits to Kids; from there, Hickenlooper hired Freedman to head up the state’s marijuana coordination office.

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Flickr/IntelFreePress..

It looks like there’s finally an official plan in place for the purchase of some more body cameras for hundreds of local law enforcement officers.
Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson announced this afternoon that her office plans to dole out $1 million to the Houston Police Department and $900,000 to the Harris County Sheriff’s Office for the purchase of hundreds of body cameras, which will be worn by officers while they’re on duty. The money will come from assets the office has seized during criminal investigations, Anderson said.

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Phoenix New Times 2014.


Dr. Sue Sisley was about to conduct some of the most important cannabis research in the United States when she was abruptly fired from her job at the University of Arizona this past June for what she says (and what clearly appears to be) purely political reasons.
Our cohorts at the Phoenix New Times have done an amazing job looking into what happened and, more importantly, what is in store for Sisley’s study that looks at how military veterans can use cannabis to help treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

It’s about 2 o’clock on July 31, a hot and humid Thursday afternoon, and Mike and Scott (who asked to be identified only by their first names) are kicking back in Aloha Community Collective Association. The low-key Santa Ana medical-marijuana dispensary is nestled comfortably in a somewhat-decrepit two-story building just off 17th Street, a couple of blocks from the 5 freeway. Rachel Garcia, a receptionist and budtender, is standing outside the shop. She notices two middle-aged men who look like typical patients approaching the entrance.
Suddenly, several police vehicles and a paddy wagon pull up. Garcia knows in an instant the two men are plainclothes cops. Sure enough, they signal to the arriving convoy by pointing at the dispensary. They command Garcia to go back inside, which she does, immediately informing Mike and Scott that police officers are outside. By the time she starts talking, one of the vehicles is already parked on the dispensary’s doorstep, almost blocking the front door.

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Dr. Sue Sisley.

Back in June, the University of Arizona without warning fired Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead researcher in a program that would have studied the use of medical cannabis for post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms – though many suspect it was for Sisley’s marijuana advocacy.
The move struck a blow to people hoping for clinical proof of the efficacy of cannabis that could increase access to medical cannabis in Arizona and beyond, including Iraq veteran Ricardo Pereyda who created a petition that has more than 29,000 signatures so far (and could use one from you, too). See the petition and links to sign it below.

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Arizonans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder now qualify for medical cannabis recommendations in the state, according to a health department ruling Wednesday. This is the first time a condition has been added to the list since voters approved the program in 2010 and is a huge victory for Arizona’s large veteran population.
According Arizona Department of Health Services director Will Humble there is at least one study showing that cannabis can help with PTSD symptoms and that the study, combined with numerous of anecdotal accounts, was enough to sway his decision.

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The University of Arizona isn’t saying much about the firing of medical-marijuana researcher Sue Sisley, but officials deny any political motivations. In an email sent to our sister blog, the Phoenix New Times, in response to our questions this morning, a U of A representative also notes that the university has “championed” medical-marijuana.
Sisley, an outspoken MD who’s been pushing to study how marijuana affects post-traumatic stress disorder patients, was told last month her contract with the U of A’s Telemedicine Program wouldn’t be renewed. She claims that Joe “Skip” Garcia, the University of Arizona’s senior vice president for health sciences, told her that Senate President Andy Biggs had questioned Sisley’s activism, and soon after she received the letter announcing her contract would not be renewed.
The Phoenix New Times has more on this story, including the U of A response.

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Sue Sisley.

The lead researcher for a study looking at medical marijuana for post-traumatic stress disorder at the University of Arizona has been fired, and she is now claiming it is because of her cannabis lobbying.
Sue Sisley, formerly the assistant director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program at UA, was informed this week that her contract will not be renewed next year but was not given any reason in a letter from the interim dean of the College of Medicine.
But Sisley says the reasons are pretty clear. She says it is because of her advocacy at the state capitol for medical cannabis research – particularly in PTSD treatments for returning military veterans.
That included speaking at the state capitol to provide some sense to the argument when people like State Sen. Kimbery Yee blocked research funding based on her own political agenda. Keep in mind, the $6 million she blocked from being used was all excess from medical marijuana patient and dispensary fees. But Yee didn’t want it to go back to the benefit of medical marijuana patients.

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