Search Results: government (1482)

Flickr/Wolfgang Staudt.

Last Thursday, the Department of Justice released a three-page memo announcing that the federal government will not prosecute Native Americans growing and selling marijuana on tribal lands, even in states where the drug is illegal. So will dispensaries become the new casinos?
Probably not. Many tribal leaders, including Executive Director of the Los Angeles City/County Native American Indian Commission Ron Andrade, found the announcement surprising and suspicious.

Florida remains one of the last few states where growing and selling marijuana in any capacity is still illegal. But that might change, at least in one aspect, according to a report by the L.A. Times that says the U.S. government will not stop Native American tribes from growing or selling pot on sovereign land.
The report says the Justice Department will not try to enforce federal marijuana laws on Native American reservations, even if it’s otherwise illegal in a respective tribe’s state. Which essentially means tribes can grow and sell weed on their land without government interference. Broward-Palm Beach New Times has more.

Commons/Protoplasmakid

Last night, President Barack Obama announced he will take executive action to shield five million undocumented immigrants from deportation. The prime-time speech was big news in the U.S., kicking up a political skirmish ahead of the 2016 elections. But it was far from the continent’s top story. Instead, that title goes to the disappearance and presumed assassination of 43 students in Mexico.
The American media has largely ignored the unrest down south. Bizarrely, the Book Fair has brought the news to Miami anyway. Earlier this week, prize-winning Mexican writer Elena Poniatowska compared the massacre to the horrors of the “concentration camps.” And in an interview to promote his own appearance this weekend, fellow writer Francisco Goldman tells New Times that this is a “terrifying and exhilarating” moment for Mexico.

INCB.org
Wayne Hall.


Professor Wayne Hall dislikes drugs. So much so, he advises the World Health Organization on drug issues and teaches “addiction policy” at the King’s College in London. According to Hall, he’s gone through 20 years of research and can show that marijuana leads to mental illness, sick babies and car crashes.
His findings are based on government-funded (anti-cannabis) reports from the last 20 years that he hand-selected. Basically, he’s parroting other, old reports and passing it off as something new.


A study out of Australia and New Zealand this week claims that daily pot use by teens leads to more than half dropping out of school, and greatly increases the likelihood that they’ll drop out of college, try to kill themselves and if they’ll end up on welfare.
But they aren’t really saying that. They actually say they found no “causal” relationship between pot and depression, only increased odds of a link. They also say didn’t find enough evidence to support their claim that adolescent teen users were seven times more likely to kill themselves. But that doesn’t stop them from spreading the fear around just the same.


As we reported earlier this week, Asian movie star Jaycee Chan, son of legendary Kung Fu film icon Jackie Chan, was arrested in his home in Beijing last week with about 3.5 ounces of herb.
While you might expect the star of the legendary Drunken Master to offer his sympathies in public for his son Jaycee, Jackie Chan – who is now the official Chinese Police Narcotics Control Ambassador – says he is saddened and ashamed.

Flickr.com/AlexK100

Take it with a grain of sale (we do), but researchers at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine funded by the National Institutes of Health, say that the offspring of rats exposed to cannabis were less motivated than offspring of non-THC dosed rats.
Their proof? Researchers had two groups of rat: one given THC injections and the other given saline. The researchers then bred the rats and say that they showed a lowered desire to seek “highly tasty food”.

1 2 3 149