Search Results: hollywood (67)

That could end with legalization.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

California companies tell Inc. that a growing number of raids on businesses in California owe to asset forfeiture laws which allow authorities to seize cash and other valuables even if criminal charges aren’t filed.

An American citizen who was invasively searched at the Texas/Mexico border in 2012 will receive a $475,000 settlement but not an admission of guilt from the U.S. Border and Customs Protection agency. She previously received $1.1M from an El Paso, Texas, hospital that conducted secondary searches.

Devontre Thomas, the Oregon teen who faces a federal misdemeanor charge for possessing “about a gram” of marijuana, allegedly had it at his boarding school which is run by the federal Bureau of Indian Education. He faces up to a year in prison.

A judge in a trafficking case has ordered Yahoo to disclose how it handles deleted emails. The evidence includes emails that, according to Yahoo’s policy should not be accessible.

Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte defended war on drugs which includes offering money to those who kill drug dealers.

Masamitsu Yamamoto, a Japanese man with liver cancer died at 58 while on trial for MED possession.

A lot of cannabis is found on federal land. The mail is a popular way to send weed and other drugs.

An Alabama prison guard was charged with using a Bible to smuggle opioids into a prison.

TV personality Montel Williams was briefly detained in Germany for MED.

At 99.9 % THC, crystalline is the strongest hash in the world. It sells for $200 a gram in southern California dispensaries.

Humboldt County, Calif. will start stamping product originating in the famed growing region. John Malkovich will star as the head of a crime family in the Netflix series “ Humboldt,” inspired by Emily Brady’s book “ Humboldt: Life on America’s Marijuana Frontier.”

Hip hop star Lil’ Wayne stormed off stage 10 minutes into his set at a High Times event in southern California. High Times said it was “baffled” and “awaiting an explanation.”

Yahoo meets Jeremy Plumb, Portland’s “wizard of weed.” The Oregon State Fair will give out blue ribbons for top pot plants. A Portland director made the first professional cannabis drink commercial/video. It features a cute song.

Billionaire Richard Branson said he has smoked pot with his son and recommended that other parents do the same. Cannabis Now interviews impresario Dr. Dina, who’s not a real doctor.

Cannabis absinthe exists, but doesn’t contain THC.

The Cannabist says little gifts of weed are not a substitute for tipping.

In The Onion, Joe Biden said it breaks his heart that so many hard working Americans can only afford “shitty ditch weed.”

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter. Send recommendations for upcoming lists (opponents, executives, activists etc.) to [email protected]. Self-nominations welcome.

KIND Financial’s CEO, David Dinenberg, at the company’s headquarters in HollywoodWhen KIND Financial began in 2014, it was supposed to be the Wells Fargo for weed growers and dispensaries.

“I was initially going to be KIND Banking,” CEO David Dinenberg says. “I was going to be the marijuana bank.”

He says the idea struck when he was watching a 60 Minutes segment on marijuana businesses, which mentioned that the industry had no banking, credit cards or financial services. “If you had sneezed or coughed during the 15 seconds that this information was presented, you’d have missed it,” the impeccably dressed Dinenberg says, sitting in an airy conference room of his Hollywood office. Soon thereafter, he began learning about the cannabis industry. “The research evolved into a business plan,” he says. “I gravitate toward a problem and not the story.”

To learn more, read L.A. Weekly‘s full story about KIND Financial.

While the War on Drugs has become the largest political sideshow the United States has even produced, there is simply no denying the heaping helping of humor that has manifested from the nation’s lust for the dust and Uncle Sam’s madcap approach to keeping their nose clean, so to speak. Yet, that has not stopped thousands of people every year from pushing bags of brown, white and green dope into nearly every orifice of their bodies, in hopes of bamboozling drug-sniffing authorities all over the country.
Unfortunately, while squeezing a fat sack of crack between your butt cheeks can sometimes be an effective method for avoiding a shakedown, the moment some large meathead cop whispers something in your ear like, “What’s your sign, sailor,” there is a damn good chance you are about to fisted in the back room by a group of sexually confused law enforcement cronies.


A week ago we told you about controversial cop Frank Lyga with the Los Angeles Police Department, who has been accused of being a racist asshole. It seems Lyga’s bosses think so, too. Lyga was terminated by Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck, the detective’s attorney, Ira Salzman, told L.A. Weekly yesterday.
Lyga was sent home with pay in June after a recording of comments he made to an ongoing-training course for law enforcement was brought to the media’s attention by political consultant Jasmyne Cannick. The white detective, who justifiably* shot a black officer in 1997 while both were out of uniform, said, “I could have killed a whole truckload of them.”

YouTube
Failed reality TV show “Texas Takedown” lands cops in court


Apparently full to the brim with shows about everything from hoarders to housewives, reality TV producers in the state of Texas have found a new format to film – the home invasion.
The proposed show is called “Texas Takedown” and it follows a crew-cut band of Lone Star state lawmen as they kick down the doors of unsuspecting Texans from Austin to the Alamo, hoping that whatever waits on the other side is at least good for ratings.
On September 22nd of 2011, just after 10 o’clock pm, fame came crashing through the front door of the home belonging to then 59-year old Perla Carr.


While we think the Emmy’s are generally just a reach-around for Hollywood elite and don’t really represent the best acting, directing or writing on television, the awards ceremony occasionally provide some entertainment.
Like last night, when comedian Sara Silverman showed off her hash-oil filled vaporizer pen to a national audience while completely blowing off mindless questions about fashion and proved that at least one person in Hollywood thinks the awards are as big of a joke as us.

BPBNT courtesy of Cheryl Shuman.
Cheryl Shuman posing for photos in a garden she likely doesn’t actually tend.


Cheryl Shuman runs the Beverly Hills Cannabis Club out of L.A., which she says sells one of the first designer brands of pot (never mind that there apparently isn’t an actual dispensary). Her product runs $750 an ounce and comes wrapped in 14-carat gold (no word on if anyone is naive enough to actually pay that). New dupes customers often get star treatment: Chefs will come to their mansions to prepare cannabis-infused meals.
In fact, Shuman claims her entire clientele is star-studded. She says she’s sold to celebrities like Justin Timberlake, who told Playboy in 2011 that he “absolutely” smokes. Other clients have to be kept on the down-low, and the business lacks a brick-and-mortar location in the Hollywood Hills. (She claims a lot, actually, and some say she’s full of it). Now the self-professed “Martha Stewart of marijuana” wants to start a political Super PAC of pot-smoking mommies in Florida to help get medical marijuana passed this November. Read more at the Broward-Palm Beach New Times.


Denver is the Hollywood of cannabis, according to KC Stark. As for Colorado Springs, he sees it as Silicon Valley — which is why he decided it was the perfect place to serve as a base for his latest venture, MMJ Business Academy. The academy’s mission, Stark explains, is to break down and explain the new and complicated laws and licensing procedures for people looking to get into the pot industry.
“We saw the need for comprehensive understanding of that marijuana monopoly game. It’s three-dimensional; it moves and changes. It’s brutal,” Stark says.

A screen capture of a billboard from KHOU.


It appears as though a Mexican drug cartel has incorporated outdoor advertising in its arsenal of intimidation tactics in an attempt to further infiltrate the black market drug trade in the United States. Earlier last week, as motorists in El Paso, Texas began their morning commute, many got to see a series of billboards which had gone up up overnight displaying threatening messages accented with a couple of well-dressed mannequins swinging from a noose.

Compton Mayor Aja Brown.

Throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s, the city of Compton, CA gained an infamous reputation across mainstream America as a drug-addled wasteland, ruled by gangs and racked by unthinkable violence.
Fueled at the time by accounts from gangster rap titles and Hollywood portrayals of the hardened region of South Central Los Angeles, today Compton is much less violent, but just as vulnerable, running a $40-million deficit as it struggles to try to avoid all out bankruptcy. It’s not hard to see that a change of direction is needed.

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