Search Results: humble (40)


Sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder can begin obtaining medical marijuana legally under Arizona law as soon as January.
Will Humble, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, announced the decision today in his blog. PTSD patients and medical-cannabis advocates have been expecting a decision since last month, when state Administrative Law Judge Thomas Shedden ruled that PTSD should be deemed a qualifying ailment.


Arizonans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder now qualify for medical cannabis recommendations in the state, according to a health department ruling Wednesday. This is the first time a condition has been added to the list since voters approved the program in 2010 and is a huge victory for Arizona’s large veteran population.
According Arizona Department of Health Services director Will Humble there is at least one study showing that cannabis can help with PTSD symptoms and that the study, combined with numerous of anecdotal accounts, was enough to sway his decision.


An administrative law judge this week ordered the state to allow PTSD sufferers to use medical marijuana, reversing a decision by the state health-services department.
Will Humble, director of the state DHS, wrote about Wednesday’s decision by state Administrative Law Judge Thomas Shedden in his blog last week.
“I have until July 9 to either accept, reject or modify the recommended decision,” Humble wrote. “I’ll be studying the report and will make a decision after analyzing the Decision and Order.”

The Arizona Department of Health Services again denied adding PTSD, depression, and migraines to the list of medical conditions that qualify people for a medical-marijuana card.
DHS Director Will Humble wrote on his blog that he “didn’t approve the petitions because of the lack of published data regarding the risks and benefits of using Cannabis to treat or provide relief for the petitioned conditions.” Phoenix New Times has the rest.

Scott Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists to take on a quasi-regular column we’d like to call: Glass Class.
This week, it’s the second half of our introduction from glass guru Scott “Trikky” Saed. He’s a humble guy with a lot of talent, but he’s always looking to learn and explore glassblowing more and spread knowledge and skill to the growing world of new-school American glassblowers and pipe makers. Enough of our flattery, we’ll let Saed introduce himself:

Scott Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists to take on a quasi-regular column we’d like to call: Glass Class.
This week, we’d like to introduce our glass guide and guru, Scott “Trikky” Saed. He’s a humble guy with a lot of talent, but he’s always looking to learn and explore glassblowing more and spread knowledge and skill to the growing world of new-school American glassblowers and pipe makers. Enough of our flattery, we’ll let Saed introduce himself:

All photos by Sharon Letts
Pure Life Wellness is located on La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles

By Sharon Letts
On the heels of continued raids by the DEA of four legally run dispensaries in Los Angeles, West L.A. dispensary owner Yamileth Bolanos is pretty much at the end of her Hemp rope, so to speak.
Bolanos, who is founder and owner of Pure Life Wellness, has been at the forefront of cannabis activism in the city of Los Angeles, where recently dispensaries were threatened with closure by city officials.
With the creation of GLACA, the “Greater Los Angeles Cannabis Alliance,” Bolanos, with other longtime dispensary owners, banded together to create their own entity in order to deal with the powers that be, driven by the philosophy that “strength in numbers” matter.
“We founded GLACA in 2006 to help create ordinances on how dispensaries should behave, because the city would not instate ordinances until 2010,” Bolanos said. “Those who were operating safely and were respectful of their neighbors needed a way to differentiate from profiteers who did not care about patient safety, or were otherwise problematic in their behavior.”

The first volume of S.T. Oner’s lush Cannabis Indica examined 100 strains from 100 leading marijuana breeders. Now it’s time for another trip through the dankest, fattest buds this side of the Hindu Kush, featuring information about the genetic history, growing traits, taste and effects of some of the very best cannabis grown across the globe.

The second book of the Cannabis Indica series (there’s also two volumes of Cannabis Sativa already out) continues the exploration of indica strains. From Afghan Mountain Black to Zindica, 100 more indica strains are showcased in all their glory with full color photos and encyclopedic information. (The planned series will eventually include six books, presumably three volumes of Indica and three of Sativa.)
Master cannabis grower and Cannabis Cultivation author Mel Thomas provides the introduction to Cannabis Indica, Volume 2. But Mel’s contribution is far more than a typical introduction; it’s title “What the Kush? A History of the Cannabis Indica Plant” lets you know the ambitions considerably exceed that humble appellation. Thomas’s quest to find pure indica at its source — as he had done for pure sativa in Thailand, a few years before — makes for some eye-opening and informative readcing.
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