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Two powerful federal agencies have given some optimism to Colorado hemp farmers and CBD companies.

Late last month, the United States Department of Agriculture announced a temporary suspension of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s involvement with industrial hemp testing, a factor of federal hemp regulations that worried Colorado farmers for a variety of reasons. Days later, the Food and Drug Administration announced a more collaborative approach toward future CBD regulations with stakeholders of the hemp-derived CBD industry.

On Thursday, February 27th, edible company Wana Brands hosted a launch party to introduce Wana Quick, its new line of of fast-acting gummies.

The company partnered with CBD brand Azuca and chef Ron Silver to create a fast-onset edible that aims to produce a high similar to the immediate effects resulting from smoking or vaping, instead of the typical slow-building body high most edibles give us.

According to Wana, the new technology from Azuca creates “individually encapsulated cannabinoids that work at the molecular level to enter the bloodstream immediately.”

Two of Colorado’s most popular party favors are teaming up to reduce carbon emissions. Denver Beer Co. and the Clinic, a marijuana dispensary chain with several growing operations, have partnered in a recycling program aimed at reducing carbon dioxide waste across both the craft-beer and cannabis industries.

Unveiled by Governor Jared Polis and the state departments of Energy and Public Health and Environment on January 29, the new pilot program allows brewers to capture the CO2 byproduct of their brewing processes and then ship it to marijuana growers, who will use the gas as a supplement to boost their plant yields.

Legal marijuana’s place in college education is still limited, but it’s starting to pay off for some University of Denver graduates.

The university’s Sturm College of Law and its media and journalism programs have offered classes centered on legal weed since 2015, with the Daniels School of Business following suit in 2017. And now, alumni are beginning to make their marks on the nation’s burgeoning industry.

Colorado’s cannabis history stretches much further back than November 2012, when voters approved legalizing recreational marijuana. The state’s skunky roots were planted decades earlier, when home growers and college students began creating a real Rocky Mountain High. Now, some of their sons and daughters are helping to shape the current commercial market.

Lama Brand Cannabis owner Tony Karas grew up in Evergreen, and, after graduating from Colorado State University nearly twenty years ago, slowly waded into the pot industry with his friends. Today, the avid fisherman and father runs his own cannabis supply company, Lama Brand, growing award-winning strains while still sharing laughs with the people he grew up with.

Colorado has banned the state’s marijuana industry from adding vitamin E acetate, the chemical additive linked to vaping illnesses by federal health officials, to products meant for inhalation.

On November 8, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced a potential culprit behind the recent vaping illnesses: vitamin E acetate. However, Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division had already prohibited the additive as an ingredient days earlier, and also banned two more ingredients with connections to short- and long-term health issues. In addition to vitamin E acetate, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and medium chain triglycerides (MCT oil) are now ruled out for marijuana products meant for inhalation.

As the winter holidays approach, retail companies routinely find themselves needing extra seasonal help for the extra business. But rather than working inside an Amazon warehouse, you could trim weed instead.

“They call it Crop-tober, and it primarily affects outdoor grows in southern Colorado and northern California, around mid-September through October,” explains Karson Humiston, founder of cannabis employment recruiter Vangst.

Did you know that pot brownies became popular by mistake? Or that one of the world’s earliest edible recipes was used by a band of assassins? The history of cooking with cannabis starts over a thousand years ago, comes to a screeching halt in the twentieth century, then moves at light speed after 2012.

Already riding high off the success of her first foray into cannabis literature, The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, author and journalist Robyn Griggs Lawrence — a self-described “digital nomad” who lived in Boulder for many years — now dives into humanity’s long relationship with eating cannabis in Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis. In this new book, Lawrence describes the ancient eating habits of Chinese and Persian cultures while teaching us about our own country’s past with the plant. We caught up with Lawrence to learn more about the history of eating cannabis and some of her favorite infused snacks.

The hoopla surrounding CBD has become so loud that even CBD companies are starting to get annoyed. One Colorado CBD brand recently went so far as to buy ads in New York’s Time Square to attack gimmicky products and marketing campaigns that push CBD into everything from candles to firewood.

CBDistillery, a company known for hemp-derived CBD edibles, oils, capsules, vaporizers and more, wants people to be more discerning about how they consume CBD. But where is that line drawn, and who should be leading the conversation? We chatted with CBDistillery chief marketing officer Chris Van Dusen to see what he thinks.

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