Search Results: indonesia (9)

Photo: LGN
Our brothers and sisters in Indonesia are already in the street. Why stand we here idle?

Indonesia has some tough marijuana laws. In fact, having just a joint can get you up to four years in prison in this Southeast Asian island nation. But one brave and committed group of cannabis activists is leading the way towards legalization and regulation of the herb in Indonesia.

The group, Lingkar Ganja Nusantara (LGN), which means “Circle of Ganja Archipelago” in English, is raising consciousness on the cannabis issue in Indonesia, distributing information on the many uses and benefits of the plant.

Photo: The Malay Mail
Alam Setiawan, 39, being led out of court Friday after being sentenced to death.

​Marijuana can’t kill you, but marijuana laws can. A 39-year-old Indonesian laborer on Friday was sentenced to death for the trafficking of cannabis.

Alam Setiawan from Tanjung Asahan Balai was arrested on April 25 after he was caught with 1,732 grams (just under four pounds) of marijuana at a fertilizer warehouse in Port Klang, reports Darshini Kandasamy in The Malay Mail.
Shah Alam High Court Judge Mohd Yazid said the defense failed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt Alam’s claim that the culprit was another Indonesian man named Udin.
Alam said it was Udin, not him, who had thrown a plastic bag containing two bricks of cannabis into the ocean during the raid.
The judge said Alam’s claim was not believable, and that Udin was a fictitious character.

They may have been the first weed dealers.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Evidence suggests that Bronze Age Yamnaya tribespeople established a cannabis trade between Europe and Asia 5,000 years ago. Native to the Caucasus Mountains (roughly), the Yamnaya were horse-riding, cattle-herding nomads who traveled along what later became the Silk Road.

While neighbors Indonesia and the Philippines escalate their wars on drugs, Thailand may reform its famously harsh laws.

Can you find weed growing in the wild? Green Rush Daily investigates.

The Cannabist interviews joint rolling artist Tony Greenhand.

Eugene Monroe, who got cut from the Baltimore Ravens this year after he became the first active NFL player to call for MED use, has retired from the league. He’s one of jocks included on the Men’s Journal list of 18 cannabis activists in sports. The only woman is mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey. Earlier this year The New Yorker discussed “ The athlete’s case for cannabis.”

Tabloid stories about the dangers of drugs appear to fuel greater drug use. Gatherings where everyone stays sober are becoming trendy.

Agneya Singh, director of “ M Cream,” a movie billed as Bollywood’s first stoner flick, says India should decriminalize.

This weekend’s Enchanted Forest Gathering, a rave in northern California, was among the first U.S. festivals to have a MED dispensary on site. Alcohol was not sold.

Clothing company Patagonia, has made a short film ”Harvesting Liberty” to support industrial hemp legalization.

Michael “Dooma” Wendschuh, the central figure in my story “ Ebbu and the rise and fall of a modern weed dealer” has a new cannabis company. According to its LinkedIn page, Toronto-based Province Brands is a “global luxury brand” creating products “which do not feel like marijuana products.”

Some schoolchildren in the U.K. are gardening with cannabis compost.


As Indonesia’s most popular vacation destination, the island of Bali expects to welcome as many as 10 million tourists this year. Being surrounded by crystal clear waters, white sand beaches, and cheap Nepalese hash may sound like paradise…oh, ok, it is paradise.
But if you plan to be among those planning a trip to Bali in 2014, you should beware that the National Narcotics Agency Bali (BNN) – sort of Indonesia’s version of the DEA – has vowed to crack down on narcotics tourism in what they say has already been a busy year of drug busts.

globalcannabismarch.com


What began in 1999 under the name Million Marijuana March, with events in 30 cities across America, is now, 15 years later, a global initiative for the advocacy of marijuana reform with marches, rallies, and events happening in 160 cities across 35 different countries this Saturday, May 3rd.
These days referred to as the Global Marijuana March (GMM), the multinational event is traditionally held on the first Saturday of each month. New York City, Atlanta, and Boston, along with cities like Toronto and Vancouver in Canada and Mexico City in Mexico, are just a handful of the cities that will be rallying for cannabis on behalf of North America on Saturday. Joining them will be nations from Central America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and more.

Cracked
Hemp kills in Malaysia — because hemp rope is what they use to hang you.

​A 39-year-old laundry operator in Malaysia was sentenced to death by the High Court there for “trafficking more than 1kg of cannabis last year.”

The prosecution had proven its case against Nazli Sahid Said “beyond reasonable doubt,” ruled Judicial Commissioner Datuk Zakiah Kassim, reports New Straits Times.
Malaysia, along with Vietnam, Indonesia, China and a handful of other Asian countries, has some of the harshest drug laws on Earth.
Mere possession of more than 200 grams of cannabis carries a mandatory death penalty by hanging in Malaysia.
Nazli, from Penang, Malaysia, was convicted of trafficking 1.06 kilograms of marijuana at Mergong, Alor Star at 10 p.m. on December 24, 2010.

AFP/Sonny Tumbelaka
Australia’s ambassador to Indonesia, Greg Moriarty, has been working to secure the release of the 14-year-old boy who was arrested for marijuana, among huge media interest

​The arrest of a 14-year-old Australian boy in Bali for marijuana possession has created a media firestorm. The boy will likely be held in “drug rehabilitation” for up to another month while he waits to learn how and when he will go to trial.

The Australian ambassador to Indonesia said the case is his “top priority,” reports The Conversation, and even Australia’s Prime Minister Julia Gillard telephoned the teen in prison on Sunday, assuring him “everything is being done” to secure his release.

Photo: kabooom.net

​Paris Hilton has canceled her tour of Asia and returned home after she was denied entry at Tokyo’s airport Wednesday following a drug violation in the United States, running afoul of strict Japanese laws that have previously tripped up celebrities as huge as Paul McCartney.

“I’m going back home, and I look forward to coming back to Japan in the future,” said a smiling Hilton before departing on her private jet, reports Associated Press writer Shino Yuasa.
The 29-year-old socialite had arrived at Narita International Airport, outside the Japanese capital, two days after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor cocaine charge in Las Vegas. Japan has strict immigration laws barring entry to those convicted of drug offenses, but exceptions are occasionally granted.
Hilton had been scheduled to appear Wednesday at a news conference in Tokyo to promote her fashion and fragrance lines. She arrived Tuesday evening, but was stopped at the airport and spent the night at an airport hotel after being questioned by Japanese officials.

Photo: Samsul Said, The Malay Mail
Shahrul Izani is escorted out of the courtroom by police this morning, on his way to Death Row

​A 25-year-old man wept openly in Malaysian High Court court this morning when the judge sentenced him to death for marijuana.

Shahrul Izani Suparman was convicted of possessing 622 grams of cannabis with intent to deliver, reports Azreen Hani of The Malay Mail. Shahrul was 19 years old when he was arrested on Sept. 25, 2003.
According to police, Shahrul tried to get away from them on foot when he was ordered to stop while riding his motorcycle in Klang, Malaysia. Authorities said Shahrul had made a U-turn, and was riding without his lights on.
The marijuana, packed in two separate newspaper wrappings, was found in the motorcycle’s basket. Shahrul was charged under Malaysia’s Dangerous Drugs Act of 1952, which upon conviction carries a death sentence by hanging.