Search Results: kansas (118)

Eric Jensen feels trapped. By now, the 43-year-old thought he’d be able to travel from his home in southeastern Colorado to see his son play college ball in the Midwest. But instead, he can’t cross the border into Kansas. He’s stuck hanging around his home town, where most of the residents have turned their backs on him, believing that he’s a hardened drug dealer. Instead, he’s facing criminal charges for something that’s completely legal in Colorado: hemp.

Eric and his brother, 39-year-old Ryan Jensen, grew up in the town of Holly, ten miles from the Kansas border. Early on, they started working on the family farm, the fourth generation to do so, and by 2007, they’d taken over for their father, Robert. They grew wheat and corn and onions and cabbage, which was harvested and shipped to grocery stores across the country. But their biggest crop was cantaloupe.

It took long enough, but the country is finally starting to come around to hemp. Kansas is just taking a little longer than the rest of us.

The non-psycoactive cannabis plant and the oils, fibers and cannabinoids derived from it have seen a huge boom in consumer interest over the past few years and grew 16 percent in sales from 2016 to 2017, according to a recent analysis from Hemp Industry Daily. Hemp has even become an ingredient in beer, with Fort Collins-based New Belgium Brewing Company (the fourth-largest craft brewery in the country) releasing a pale ale in March that is brewed with hemp seeds to extract cannabis-like flavor and aromas.

Since shortly after the 2012 passage of Amendment 64, which permitted limited recreational marijuana sales in Colorado, we’ve reported about alleged pot profiling. Over the years, multiple drivers have said they were pulled over for little or no reason while driving a car with Colorado license plates by state troopers in bordering states on the lookout for cannabis, with Kansas among the most frequently mentioned problem jurisdictions.

Now, just over a year since a federal court ordered that pot profiling in Kansas end, a Denver-area resident tells us she’s recently been stopped three times in the state by law enforcers who apparently became interested in her the second they saw that her plate represented a legal-pot state.

Update: In January, we reported about surveys being sent to prosecutors and law enforcement officials in Kansas by attorney general Derek Schmidt in an effort to determine how Colorado cannabis was negatively impacting the good people of that state; our previous coverage has been incorporated into this post.

Nine months later, Schmidt has delivered the fruit of this labor — “‘Legalization’ of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact on Kansas,” a report on view below. And a summary of the results suggests that the quality of cannabis available in the state has improved significantly thanks to Kansas’s proximity to Colorado.

A photo from the Kansas State Patrol Facebook page.

For years, we’ve written about reports of marijuana profiling.

The claims consistently maintain that law enforcers in jurisdictions beyond this state are more apt to stop vehicles for marijuana-related searches if they’re outfitted with Colorado license plates.

Such tactics were always controversial. Now, a federal court says they’re totally unjustified.

Azel Praer/Flickr
The seeds of change are sprouting in Kansas


The way that the laws are currently written, you really do not want to get busted with weed in Wichita, Kansas…or any part of Kansas for that matter.
A first-time offense for simple pot possession in Kansas will earn you a misdemeanor charge on your record, up to a $2,500 fine, and even a year in jail. Get popped a second time and you could be looking at a felony.
But if the pro-cannabis advocacy group Kansas for Change has their way, that may be about to change for the better.


Late last week Oklahoma and Nebraska filed suit in the U.S. Supreme Court to halt Colorado’s implementation of Amendment 64. Basically, both states say they are tired of dealing with marijuana that crosses the border. In the suit, they claim that Colorado cannabis ties up law enforcement agencies and is wreaking havoc on police and state trooper budgets. And now it seems another neighbor to the east is mulling jumping on the bandwagon.
Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has been debating whether to sue Colorado for months, according to his staff. Jennifer Rapp, spokeswoman for Schmidt, told KMBC News that Schmidt is still “weighing his options.”
Our own William Breathes has the full story over at the Latest Word.

Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe.

Getting arrested for marijuana can ruin your life in Arkansas. Unless you are the governor’s son, that is.
Outgoing Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe announced yesterday that he plans to pardon his son’s 2003 felony marijuana charges. Kyle Beebe was convicted of marijuana possession with intent to deliver. Mike Beebe has pardoned nearly 700 nonviolent offenders in during his tenure in office and says his son deserves the same second chance as all the other people he’s let off.


The story of Trucker the pit bull would be weird under any circumstances. After all, he disappeared in Arkansas in June only to turn up almost four months later in Central City, Colorado. But the tale becomes that much stranger given the circumstances of his rescue: A Good Samaritan bought him from a homeless man who’d reportedly tried to trade him for pot.

Senator Pat Roberts and opponent Greg Orman at a debate this weekend.


For years, marijuana advocates have warned folks from Colorado to think twice before taking cannabis over the state line to Kansas, which has some of the toughest weed-related penalties in the country and has been repeatedly accused of pot profiling. So it’s something of a surprise to discover that the two candidates in a suddenly competitive Kansas senatorial race — incumbent Pat Roberts and independent upstart Greg Orman — both have problems with federal marijuana policies.

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