Search Results: lca (57)

Vaporizers FTW

In an innovation sure to please patients who can’t afford to, well, cough up almost $700 for a Volcano vaporizer, one San Francisco medical marijuana delivery service is now offering the top-shelf vaporizers for rental.

Volcanoes, like other vaporizers, gently heat the herbal material without burning it, so you get pure flavor and aroma without smoke. Vaporization creates a fine mist, similar to steam, with the result being what many say is better flavor, increased purity, and greater effect.
Many patients who find cannabis smoke to be irritating report effective relief through inhaling vapor.
But with the latest digital model of the Volcano retailing for $669, many patients couldn’t afford to experience the healthy luxury of German vaporizer engineering (the Volcano is manufactured by the German firm of Storz & Bickel).

Kríttik’l Kápchər/Flickr


For over two hundred years, farmers in the state of Connecticut legally grew and harvested hemp for use in sails, ropes, and clothing. In fact, the value of hemp in colonial-era Connecticut was so high that it was actually illegal for farmers to not grow hemp. That sentiment continued all the way through World War II, when the U.S. government was distributing propaganda films urging farmers to plant hemp crops for the good of the nation.
In the 1950’s however, the hemp plant got caught up in the misguided reefer madness over marijuana, and has not been grown in Connecticut ever since.
But as cannabis acceptance grows in the state, so too does the demand for the right to grow the incredibly useful and perpetually renewable resource of hemp.


Yesterday on Israeli national television, a prominent Israeli political figure announced that he had recently taken a toke or two of cannabis. Of course, had he been caught doing it in his homeland, without the proper medical permit to be doing so, he would be breaking the law.
So seeing a conservative member of Israel’s Home Party just blurt out a confession to the world may have been surprising to some, but only if they haven’t been paying attention to Yinon Magal and his rise in national politics.

In a move that political pundits and cable news carnival barkers are calling a “bi-partisan victory” the U.S. Senate narrowly avoided another damaging government shutdown by passing a last-minute multilayered spending bill over the weekend to keep the gears turning in Washington D.C. until at least September of next year.
To see just how convoluted and counterproductive our political process has become, you need look no further than this spending bill, and buried deep within in it, one Republican’s response to the weed legalization movement that he sees surging through state politics, including the nation’s capital.


Update, July 11 at 2:49 p.m.: We spoke with representatives from the Bakersfield PD who tell us they did not make a mistake. Seriously. The Sergeant we spoke with said that they valued the haul based on a price per-gram. Yes, they value all 3,067,192 grams at roughly $24 a pop. He said they don’t go by the bulk price, only the street price, and according to their research, they think $24 a gram is reasonable.
But the reality is that by doing that, they’ve completely blown any credibility they had left. Nobody is selling 3 million grams of pot by the gram. Nobody. Try as you may to sell even an ounce at that rate, and you’d go crazy. That’s why people (the majority) buy in bulk. Also, nobody in California is paying $25 a gram on the street. Nobody. These cops are just plain clueless about the things they are supposed to know about. A more reasonable figure would be $7.6 million, or just over $1,000 a pound. Even if it was top shelf, it wouldn’t get more than $3,500 a pound — meaning it would be worth $23.67 million at most.

TokeoftheTown-Flickr.com/Zuggup


Generally speaking, we here at Toke think cats are evil animals that attempt to steal your soul while you sleep. One New Zealand kitty, though, is even more diabolical: it steals marijuana.
An unnamed woman from the Dunedin, New Zealand neighborhood of Halfway Bush called cops this week to report that her cat had dragged a baggie with about five grams of pot in it onto her back doorstep. While the cat was undoubtedly proud of his haul, his owner wasn’t very pleased and called the cops to deal with the ganja.

globalcannabismarch.com


What began in 1999 under the name Million Marijuana March, with events in 30 cities across America, is now, 15 years later, a global initiative for the advocacy of marijuana reform with marches, rallies, and events happening in 160 cities across 35 different countries this Saturday, May 3rd.
These days referred to as the Global Marijuana March (GMM), the multinational event is traditionally held on the first Saturday of each month. New York City, Atlanta, and Boston, along with cities like Toronto and Vancouver in Canada and Mexico City in Mexico, are just a handful of the cities that will be rallying for cannabis on behalf of North America on Saturday. Joining them will be nations from Central America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and more.

Florida state Reps. Katie Edwards and Matt Gaetz have taken the initial steps for a bill that would legalize limited-potency medical cannabis in Florida, namely strains high in cannabidiol (CBD) that can help with pain and seizures.
The pair say that their proposal stems from the now well-known, high-CBD, Colorado-bred strain dubbed “Charlotte’s Web” that has helped dozen of children suffering from severe seizures and shows promise for many other therapies as well.

When one thinks about Germany, rarely does cannabis freedom immediately come to mind. Volkswagens, maybe, but lax pot laws? Hardly ever.
But since April 28th, 1994, marijuana users in Deutschland have enjoyed the freedom to possess reasonably personal amounts of cannabis without fear of arrest or prosecution. Considered by the German government to be a “soft drug”, marijuana has not necessarily been legalized, so much as it is tolerated by authorities.

Don’t expect any major changes in marijuana policy from the White House any time soon (okay, if you were expecting major changes in the first place you were in for a disappointment).
At a press briefing yesterday, CNN’s Jessica Yellin asked White House Deputy Press Secretary Josh Earnest if marijuana rescheduling was on the president’s radar these days after what seems to be a rapid public opinion shift on all things marijuana over the last few years. The answer? Our president isn’t even considering it — at least, not now.

1 2 3 6