Search Results: los-angeles (37)

ile photo by Susan Slade Sanchez/L.A. Weekly

In a proposal that was widely panned by pot shops and legalization advocates, the city in June revealed possible regulations for Los Angeles cannabis businesses that would have continued the problematic policy of treating even the most legit enterprises with “limited legal immunity.”

Many cannabis folks were up in arms. Voters in March approved Proposition M, which was pitched as an initiative that would finally grant licenses to weed sellers and producers. But the measure ultimately left the fine print up to City Hall. The groups representing collectives in town opposed the limited-immunity approach in proposed regulations forwarded as a way to implement M. This week, City Council president Herb Wesson submitted additions to those regulations that would endorse full licenses for pot businesses.

Gustavo Turner/L.A. Weekly

Strict laws in the city and county of Los Angeles have, over the years, led to the closure of hundreds of illicit marijuana dispensaries, action hailed by some as a way to combat drug-related crime such as robberies and loitering.

But a new study contradicts the argument, sometimes made by law enforcement itself, that weed stores are crime magnets. The research, published in the July issue of the Journal of Urban Economics, took a close look at the city’s closure of hundreds of illicit dispensaries in 2010.

It concluded that crime around pot shops forced to shut down actually increased afterward. “When marijuana dispensaries were shut down, we found the opposite of what we were expecting,” says the paper’s co-author, USC business economics professor Tom Y. Chang. “Crime actually increased in the areas that closed relative to the ones allowed to stay open.”

Brian Feinizimer

In March, L.A. voters overwhelmingly approved Measure M, giving City Council permission to regulate the marijuana industry in the world’s biggest market. But industry leaders worry that the council’s proposed rules, released earlier this month, could force cannabis companies to relocate to more amenable cities, taking their jobs and tax dollars with them.

The proposed rules are up for a 60-day public comment period.

Marijuana industry insiders’ main complaint is that while Measure M empowered city council to regulate the industry, the proposed rules would not give cannabis businesses full legal standing. Instead of licenses or permits, the draft regulations offer “certificates of compliance.”

You could get marijuana delivered to your home in L.A. since at least the days of Cheech & Chong. But, despite California’s legalization of medical cannabis in 1996, the essential activity of having someone bring it to you has been pretty much illegal in the city of Los Angeles.

The app-based delivery service Speed Weed learned that the hard way last year when the City Attorney’s Office announced the firm would cease to exist within our borders. Of course, that hasn’t stopped other tech-based companies from keeping delivery alive in L.A. And now, ironically, state and city officials have revealed proposed regulations for medical pot that would legalize delivery, particularly the kind allegedly practiced by Speed Weed.

Loose-ends legislation from Gov. Jerry Brown’s office proposes that delivery be allowed so long as the driver is connected with a licensed brick-and-mortar dispensary. That dispensary wouldn’t have to be a storefront; it could exist simply to serve delivery customers.

marijuana-computer.jpgadmin | Toke of the Town

The company applied to trade on NASDAQ earlier this year but was rejected.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

Social network MassRoots, defaulted on almost $1 million in debt payments and laid off about 40% of its staff, according to SEC filings. This week Chairman and CEO Isaac Dietrich, wrote an upbeat letter to shareholders that did not reference either setback. The company has raised more than $5 million.

homeless_stoner-thumb-400x374.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town
 Use patterns are changing.
The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

A study found that daily marijuana use is growing rapidly, especially among users who are “poor and lack a high school diploma.” “What’s going on here is that over the last 20 years marijuana went from being used like alcohol to being used more like tobacco, in the sense of lots of people using it every day,” according to one of the researchers. (See the study here.)

The number of U.S. cannabis users is set to exceed tobacco users within a few years.

There wasn’t much talk of marijuana inside the arena at this year’s Democratic National Convention.

The industry was all over Philly.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Marijuana wasn’t often mentioned in the Democratic National Convention’s official program.

Unofficially, it was the “star.” A trade association had a party. MPP had a fundraiser. Marchers carried a 51-foot joint.

At Marijuana.com, Tom Angell (@TomAngell) unearthed the Tim Kaine quote, “I actually kind of like this option of the states as labs and they can experiment [with legalizing]and we can see what happens.” NORML revised its rating on the vice presidential candidate from F to C. (Last week, I referred to MPP ratings for presidential candidates as NORML ratings. I regret the error.)

Marijuana Business Daily interviews former U.S. deputy attorney general James Cole, whose eight-point 2013 memo gave the industry confidence that it could grow without federal prosecution. “It wasn’t really intended to be a huge policy shift as much as reacting to the situation and trying to use some common sense,” he said.

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) wants more lawmakers to support legalization.

Former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank (D) said heroin and crystal meth should be legalized. “We should outlaw a drug if it is likely to make you mistreat others. People don’t hit other people in the head because they’re on heroin; they hit other people in the head because they need to get money to buy heroin.”

The New Yorker profiles Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party’s presidential candidate and a legalization supporter. He said he would not use cannabis as president.

Quartz introduces us to Tick Segerblom (D), a dogged cannabis supporter in the Nevada State Senate.

The U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeals Board said cannabis sellers can’t receive federal trademark protection.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) decriminalized possession, making the state the third largest after New York and California to do so.

About half of the 100 Oregon communities that don’t allow REC businesses will vote on whether to lift their bans in November.

Ohio legislators knew that the provision in the state’s MED law to guarantee 15% of business licenses might be unconstitutional but they kept it in to win votes, the AP reports.

Florida billionaire Carol Jenkins Barnett, a Publix supermarket heir, donated $800,000 to oppose the state’s MED initiative.

A Los Angeles county ballot initiative that proposed a pot tax to benefit the homeless has been shelved. Canna Law Blog dives into the business climate in L.A, one of the world’s largest cannabis markets.

The DEA compared home grows to “meth houses.”

Italian lawmakers are beginning to debate legalization. Opponents include Pope Francis. The Italian military grows MED for the country.

los-angeles-marijuana-delivery-legalizationTimothy Norris/L.A. Weekly

Unless you’re a legit home nurse or other “primary caregiver” bringing medicine home to your patient, pot delivery is illegal in the city of Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles Cannabis Task Force is hoping to change that.

The group, which represents marijuana industry interests in L.A., is challenging another advocacy organization, the United Cannabis Business Alliance, to expand on some of the proposals included in its initiative to allow the city’s legal dispensaries to be granted permits once statewide medical marijuana regulations — known as the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act (MMRSA) — kick in in 2018.

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U.S. Attorney’s Office.


Federal raids on downtown Los Angeles Fashion District businesses and related bank accounts turned up a whopping $65 million, much of it in cash, that authorities say was drug money headed to the Sinaloa drug cartel in Mexico, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in L.A. announced today.
The whopping seizure of bank funds and currency, the latter of which was put on display for the press, was part of three cases against various fashion businesses, including lingerie and maternity concerns, that investigators say took drug money and exchanged it for imported goods so that the money would seem legit as it traveled south to the narco lords of Sinaloa. More over at the LA Weekly.

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Denver police officers have gotten into trouble lately — and a number of the incidents, including a brawl apparently spurred by wife swapping, featured alcohol. And that’s not to mention assorted busts involving law enforcers and drunk driving.
Could some of these episodes have been prevented if Denver cops were allowed to smoke pot while off-duty as an alternative to liquor? One marijuana advocate thinks it’s worth giving a try. More over at the Denver Westword.

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