Search Results: marks (120)

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Frank Lyga.


Controversial Los Angeles Police Department Det. Frank Lyga, whose racially charged comments to a police training class prompted his bosses to send him home with pay, was recommended for termination by the LAPD’s Board of Rights this week, a police official said. The ball is now in the court of Chief Charlie Beck who could, if he so desires, fire Lyga any day now, said the official, who did not want his name published.
What did Lyga, a decorated and hard-hitting narcotics investigator known for his undercover work, do to anger department brass? Find out more over at the LA Weekly.

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Every parking spot and nearly every seat was taken at the St. Louis Ethical Society Wednesday night as Show-Me Cannabis executive director John Payne took on Jason Grellner, the vice president of the Missouri Narcotics Officers Association to debate the pros and cons of marijuana legalization.The buzz started with a Riverfront Times post in October about retired Missouri drug cop Kevin Glaser’s Facebook comments about what he saw as “stupid, lazy potheads” filling up a town hall meeting in Cape Girardeau on marijuana legalization. Payne, none too happy with the comments, challenged Glaser to a debate, but the ex-drug cop declined. However, when RFT reached out to the MNOA’s Grellner for comment (Glaser is a board member of the MNOA) and told him about Payne’s challenge, he accepted.
Read the entire account of the debate as well as audience reaction over at the Riverfront Times.

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Congress.org
Irv Rosenfeld smokes 10 to 12 federal medical marijuana cigarettes a day — and he has for 30 years

On Tuesday, November 20, Florida stockbroker Irvin Rosenfeld will celebrate 30 years of receiving 10-12 marijuana cigarettes a day from the United States federal government. Irv, 60, has now received and smoked more than 120,000 joints from the feds.
Rosenfeld — the longest surviving of the final four federal medical cannabis patients from a program that was started in 1978 and stopped under President H. W. Bush — and 13 others were “grandfathered” in what is called a “Compassionate Care Investigational New Drug” [IND] protocol.
“Even though I have a severe bone tumor disorder, I am in great health because of my cannabis use,” Rosenfeld said. “The sad part is that the federal government either doesn’t care or does not want to know how well I am.”

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Graphic: Seattle Hempfest

There has to be a Number One in every category. When it comes to pot rallies, Seattle Hempfest is the biggest and arguably the best on the planet.

The monster marijuana rally — or “protestival,” as organizer Vivian McPeak puts it — is marking 20 years of existence with this year’s event, held at Myrtle Edwards Park on the beautiful Seattle waterfront — and for the first time ever, Hempfest is slated for three days.
The party begins at high noon on Friday, August 19 and continues until 8 p.m., then things start up again at 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, lasting until 8 each night.

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Photo: Cannabis Culture
President Nixon sniffs a wrapped brick of marijuana at the outset of his War On Drugs in 1970

​June 17 will mark 40 years since President Richard Nixon, citing drug abuse as “Public Enemy No. 1,” officially declared a “War On Drugs.” A trillion dollars and millions of ruined lives later, a political consensus is emerging that the War On Drugs is a counterproductive failure.

The Drug Policy Alliance is leading advocates all across the country in marking this auspicious date with a day of action to raise awareness about the catastrophic failure of drug prohibition and to call for an exit strategy from the failed War On Drugs.
“Some anniversaries provide an occasion for celebration, others a time for reflection, still others a time for action,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Forty years after President Nixon declared his war on drugs, we’re seizing upon this anniversary to prompt both reflection and action. And we’re asking everyone who harbors reservations about the war on drugs to joint us in this enterprise.

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Graphic: Scannain

Mr. Nice, a riveting British film which will be released in the United States on Friday, June 3, tells the story of the legendary Howard Marks, a Welsh-born Oxford University student whose initial dabbling in marijuana dealing led to a career as an international cannabis smuggler. His chosen vocation resulted in supposed connections to the Irish Republican Army, MI-6 and the Mafia — all amid side jobs and cover gigs as travel agent, teacher and spy.

Watching an advance screening copy of the movie last night, Viki and I were glued to our seats by this compelling tale of a rural young Welshman’s transformation into one of the biggest cannabis dealers on the planet. Howard Marks, with his sharp, analytical business mind and fearless, calm demeanor, would have done well at anything, but thank goodness he chose the noble calling of weed smuggler.
From its evocative early scenes of the 1960s where the innocent young Marks is introduced to the world of hashish, to his meetings with IRA operatives in Ireland, members of the Brotherhood of Eternal Love in California, and hash smugglers in Pakistan, Mr. Nice almost always hits the sweet spot, with star Rhys Ifans doing an incredible job of capturing Marks’ character.

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Photo: The Weed Street Journal
Interestingly, the 1911 Massachusetts law specifically permitted medicinal use of cannabis with a prescription

​Friday marks an unhappy anniversary in hemp history. On April 29, 1911, Massachusetts enacted the first state law making it illegal to sell or possess cannabis without a prescription, becoming the first U.S. state to institute marijuana prohibition.

Violators of the new law were subject to a $100 fine and up to six months in jail, and just being present in the same room with marijuana could get you three months, according to cannabis historian Dale Gieringer of California NORML.
Ironically, marijuana was merely collateral damage of the Massachusetts law, which was aimed primarily at other “hypnotic” drugs such as opium, morphine and heroin. Abuse of opiate painkillers had become a concern among reformers and temperance advocates in the early 20th century, and cannabis was added to the list “for the sake of completeness,” since it was also a hypnotic palliative commonly found in pharmacies.
“This incidental decision would turn out to have far-reaching consequences, aptly illustrating the dangers of governmental misjudgment in matters of drug regulation,” Gieringer said.
Interestingly, the Massachusetts law specifically permitted medicinal use of cannabis with a prescription; the medical value of “Indian hemp” was widely acknowledged at the time.
“Only in 1937 was medical cannabis suppressed at the insistence of federal narcotics boss Harry Anslinger, whose last-century ‘Reefer Madness’ policy sadly remains with us today,” Gieringer said.

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Photo: Sports News
The Minnesota Timbewolves’ team president was fined $50,000 for talking about how much marijuana Michael Beasley smokes.

​The National Basketball Association on Friday fined Minnesota Timberwolves president of basketball operations David Kahn $50,000 for his recent remarks about the marijuana habit of forward Michael Beasley, for whom the team recently traded, reports the Los Angeles Times.

The big-mouthed Kahn spoke in a radio interview Thursday about Beasley’s marijuana use in Miami, claiming that it hampered his play with the Heat, reports Hardcourt Mayhem at the Bleacher Report.
He added that he spoke to Beasley about discontinuing his marijuana use with the Timberwolves, which would supposedly help him become a better player.
Kahn called Beasley “a very young and immature kid who smoked too much marijuana” during his disappointing tenure with the Miami Heat NBA team.
denver-university-du-petrovic-2020Nina Petrovic

Legal marijuana’s place in college education is still limited, but it’s starting to pay off for some University of Denver graduates.

The university’s Sturm College of Law and its media and journalism programs have offered classes centered on legal weed since 2015, with the Daniels School of Business following suit in 2017. And now, alumni are beginning to make their marks on the nation’s burgeoning industry.

purple urkleHerbert Fuego

I can’t be the only person who instantly thinks of Family Matters the minute Purple Urkle makes an appearance on a dispensary shelf. In fact, I’m pretty sure I’m in the majority.

The history behind the fruity, tranquilizing indica’s name is cloudy. The prevailing theory is that Purple Urkle was named for the strain’s potent high, which often leads to bumping into walls, irritating behavior and falling and not being able to get up — all hallmarks of everyone’s favorite nerdy annoyance in the ’90s, Steve Urkel.

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