Search Results: mcculloch (7)

St. Louis County prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch dismissed five pending felony court cases Wednesday because they depend on testimony from Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.Wilson is a key witness in the five cases — including one marijuana case — which cannot continue without his testimony.
Wilson, who fatally shot unarmed teen Michael Brown on August 9 and set off weeks of protests and backlash against police, has been in hiding since the shooting. Wilson, who is on paid administrative leave, emerged briefly to testify in Clayton to the grand jury investigating Brown’s death, but he was not seen in public. Riverfront Times has more.


The United States government has added a new tool to their anti-marijuana toolbox, announcing yesterday that they are barring state-legal cannabis growers from using federally controlled irrigation water to grow their ganja. The announcement actually doesn’t change much – it’s been illegal to use federal water to grow marijuana for decades now. But the policy announcement also likely signifies a new era of enforcement from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which controls water in 17 western states including Washington and Colorado.

Clark French
U.K. multiple sclerosis patient/cannabis activist Clark French: “Police time is wasted on cannabis”

Multiple sclerosis patient Clark French is one of thousands of patients in Britain and the world over who use cannabis to help with their medical conditions. These conditions include multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, HIV/AIDS, and Crohn’s disease. Trials are currently being conducted to determine if cannabis can stop the growth of cancers.
French, one of the founding members of NORML UK (National Organisation for the Reform of Marijuana Laws), will be appearing on Channel’s 4 4Thought program, to discuss his medical use of cannabis. 
Cannabis has become increasingly prominent in the United Kingdom in last few years, as more people and politicians have realized its therapeutic benefits and the harms produced by the black market. A July 2012 YouGov poll for The Sun showed that 45 percent supported at least decriminalization of cannabis, and that 25 percent of the population do not believe that cannabis is harmful at all.

Peter Reynolds Watch

By Kevin John Braid
Special to Toke of the Town
The murky world of far-Right politics has never been associated with marijuana legalization.  That is, until recently, in the UK, where a small political party, CLEAR, campaigning for cannabis law reform in Britain, has been marred with controversy by its leader, Peter Reynolds. Reynolds is a self-confessed Tory (that’s like a US Republican) and former member of the UK Freedom Party, a breakaway party from the far right British National Party (BNP).
It all started back in early 2011 when the members of the Legalise Cannabis Alliance (LCA), a longstanding pressure group in the UK campaigning to end prohibition of marijuana in Britain, voted to register as an official political party, who then subsequently elected Peter Reynolds as the party leader. Boasting a seemingly impressive C.V., Reynolds came into the UK cannabis scene promising to clean up the image and make great progress with politicians to get a change of law brought about in Britain.

The World Through My Specs
Peter Reynolds of CLEAR is engaged in a tug-of-war with ex-members of the organization’s Executive Committee

By Denzil White
Special to Toke of the Town
In suit and tie, Peter Reynolds looks more like an extra from the set of Mad Men than like the hairy-headed hippie stereotype of a cannabis activist. He’s definitely not hairy-headed, but when he promised to clean up the image of cannabis campaigning in the UK, few people expected the makeover to result in a beauty only skin deep.
Claiming a background in advertising and public relations, Peter Reynolds won leadership of the Legalise Cannabis Alliance, a small, single-issue political party, then set about changing the name of the party to CLEAR (Cannabis Law Reform) and brought on help to spruce up the party’s website and logo.
Reynolds wrote at the time, “We will build a new and effective brand and campaign. We are reasonable, responsible, respectable members of society from all walks of life and professions.” 
Things were looking good; MPs hit Reynolds’ “Friend” button on Facebook and the CLEAR “Comment Warriors” plagued the popular press with pro-cannabis comments on any article reporting a factory raid or medicinal marijuana critique.

Health Freedom Alliance

Crushed Beneath the Medicine Wheel
By Kassy Fatooh
In a scheme they think capable of making billions, a US corporation not only plans to market a delivery system for medicinal cannabis, but also hopes to cut out small time farmers and private growers by introducing prohibitive protocols through state health departments.
In the course of following the medical story of myalgic encephalomyelitis, I’ve learned things I wish I didn’t know about the big business of medicine, about government agencies charged with public health, and about Big Pharma’s vendetta against alternative healing practices.
Our pain is their payday. Today’s story is one of cold avarice.
The corporation is called MMDS: Medical Marijuana Delivery Systems LLC, marketing its medical cannabis delivery system through its “Medicine Wheel” subsidiary.  They hold this patent for the Tetracan transdermal patch: like Nicoderm, but it delivers cannabinoids instead of nicotine.
They advertise it as providing all the benefits of medical marijuana, without the “health-destroying smoke.”

Graphic: THC Finder

​Montana medical marijuana advocates are getting ready to start a signature-gathering effort to suspend a soon-to-be-enacted law restricting the industry — and they won’t need to collect as many names as they initially believed.

The Secretary of State’s office has determined that advocates need at least 31,238 signatures to block the Legislature’s medical marijuana overhaul bill from becoming law, reports Charles S. Johnson at the Billings Gazette. It could take up to 43,247 signatures, depending on which state House districts they use, but they won’t need to gather 73,010 signatures as some originally believed.