Search Results: mdma (17)

Israel’s Teva Pharmaceuticals will start to distribute a medical cannabis inhaler developed by Syqe, an Israeli start-up that raised money from tobacco giant Philip Morris. The inhaler may also be tested with opiates.

An editorial in The Scientist says its unacceptable that the World Health Organization has not developed positions on legalization.

Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children will begin a clinical trial of cannabis extracts containing CBD and THC for children with severe epilepsy.

A new study from Steep Hill Labs found that 83 percent of California weed wouldn’t pass Oregon’s testing standards. An industry report says Oregon’s strict regulations are crushing the state industry. Willamette Week reports that business conditions are pushing some entrepreneurs back to the underground market.

Rehab provider Spectrum Health Systems said a doctor was not to blame for revealing to a patient’s employer that she uses MED.

A survey of cannabis researchers finds out what they want from the government in order to pursue their work.

A Reason investigation finds that conservative authorities in Idaho “conspired to restrict a promising cannabis-derived seizure treatment.”

The National Fire Protection Association is developing fire safety standards for cannabis businesses.

The FDA will allow a late stage clinical trial for ecstasy as a treatment for PTSD.

Minnessota approved PTSD as a MED qualifying condition. New York approved chronic pain.

Canada’s legalization push is getting complicated. The much-anticipated task force report on legalizationhas been delayed. Meanwhile activists wonder why shops are getting raided if the government plans to legalize. For more see here.

Bill Blair a Canadian government official overseeing the issue appeared at a “ cash-for-access” fundraiser with cannabiz leaders that may have violated Liberal Party ethics guidelines. Blair defended recent raidssaying, “The only system for control is the existing legal regime. And we’re a society of laws,” he says.

The long awaited decision was a disappointment for cannabis activists.
The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will not reschedule marijuana. The 186-page decision was published Thursday in the Federal Register. The DEA also  put hemp growers on notice .

Following the decision, The Washington Post’s Christopher Ingraham wrote: “The FDA cannot determine it has a medical use in part because of the highly restrictive legal status of the drug. It’s a classic bureaucratic Catch-22.” Ingraham also collected responses from members of Congress.

For additional details and analysis on the DEA decision see Scientific American,  John Hudak atBrookings and  Wednesday’s  special edition  of WeedWeek. The industry weighs in here and here.

Federal law will continue to view cannabis as a Schedule I drug, meaning that it has high potential for abuse and no recognized medical value. Other Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD and ecstasy (MDMA).

Some in cannabis circles expected the agency to reclassify the plant as a Schedule II drug, the next most restrictive classification under the Controlled Substances Act. Schedule II drugs include cocaine, methamphetamine and several prescription opioids. (See a more complete list here.)

Cannabis activists and businesses generally want to see marijuana de-scheduled and regulated like alcohol. Rescheduling, which still could happen in the future, raises problematic questions for the pro-cannabis community about regulations governing businesses and access to MED. One lawyer called the prospect of rescheduling a “ nightmare” for the industry. My reporting suggested that the changes wouldn’t be as drastic.

NPR quotes DEA chief Chuck Rosenberg saying that he gave “enormous weight” to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  view that marijuana has “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States”

“This decision isn’t based on danger. This decision is based on whether marijuana, as determined by the FDA, is a safe and effective medicine,” Rosenberg said, “and it’s not.”

The DEA says it will, however, expand the number of facilities allowed to grow marijuana for research. For a long time, a facility at the University of Mississippi has grown all of the marijuana ordered by the federal government. Scientists who want to study MED will still need to obtain permission from the federal government.

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I spoke to Hilary Bricken, a cannabis business attorney at Seattle firm Harris Moure, about the decision. The transcript has been lightly edited for clarity:WW: This is what you predicted. What do you think were ultimately the main factors in the decision?
HB:My honest conclusion is it’s politics. It’s totally political. It’s so strange that there’s not been more transparency regarding the dialog between the DEA and the FDA. All of a sudden the DEA is saying the decision is not being based on danger to consumers. Now they’re saying quote,
“It’s based on whether marijuana as determined by the FDA is a safe and effective medicine, and
it’s not.” And that allegedly this is based on science, which is interesting because there’s a
significant lack thereof. Only recently have scientific research barriers been removed by the feds.
What’s your interpretation of the ruling to increase the number of growing facilities?
Basically, Ole Miss has had this monopoly for years. Even though the [request for proposals], to be able to cultivate cannabis for the federal government gets issued publicly, they’ve always chosen Ole Miss on a contract basis.
[The potential is] to start expanding those cultivation licenses to other researchers that may not have such, I don’t know if the word is bias, but certain types of opinions that they haven’t changed for two decades. I think it’s a positive PR piece, but I’ll believe it when I see it, if they actually do [grant more licenses].
What’s going to be the next big thing to look out for?
It’s a hurry up and wait situation with the federal government, like it always is.
Even if Hillary Clinton won the presidency, even though we have the Democratic platform calling for a reasonable pathway to legalization, I think she’s going to follow through on what she’s maintained regularly, which is: We need more research before we can unleash this product on the American public, even in the medical capacity.
To me what that also means, is that states are going to continue to lead the way on marijuana law reform and policy. I think [cannabis]just turned more into alcohol then let’s say pharmaceuticals because states are going to continue to legalize, despite what the federal government may do. It could take years now for legalization or even some type of pathway for medical marijuana. I think the states are actually going to be the ones that force [the federal government’s]hand eventually. I think it’s going to be a hurry up and wait situation, even with a Clinton administration.
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Additional reactions:

Rep. Earl Blumenauer, (D-Ore.):

“This decision doesn’t go far enough and is further evidence that the DEA doesn’t get it. Keeping marijuana at Schedule I continues an outdated, failed approach—leaving patients and marijuana businesses trapped between state and federal laws. …It’s not enough to remove some barriers to medical research. Marijuana shouldn’t be listed as Schedule I; it shouldn’t be listed at all.”

Tom Angell, Chairman, Marijuana Majority:

“President Obama always said he would let science — and not ideology — dictate policy, but in this case his administration is upholding a failed drug war approach instead of looking at real, existing evidence that marijuana has medical value…A clear and growing majority of American voters support legalizing marijuana outright and the very least our representatives should do is let states implement their own policies, unencumbered by an outdated ‘Reefer Madness’ mentality that some in law enforcement still choose to cling to.”

Kevin Sabet, CEO of Smart Approaches to Marijuana, an anti-legalization group:

This is not on surprising at all to scientists and people who follow this issue. What we’ve seen in the last couple of years is actually the science pointing in the direction of marijuana being more harmful, not less harmful…It’s also a huge blow to medical marijuana companies who were ready to press send on marketing emails touting a decision to reschedule and pushing their goods on to people who might now think that the feds totally gave up on the issue.

FlickrCommons
Virginia Ervin gave up college and motherhood to protect her criminal boyfriend after he set her and her baby on fire


“She then realized that both her and her child’s hair were on fire”
Not the sort of words you’ll ever hear leading up to a ‘Mother of the Year’ acceptance speech, but those just so happen to be the exact words written in the affidavit prepared by officers from the Missoula Police Department after investigating the aftermath of a hash oil related explosion earlier this month.
18-year old Virginia Ervin, a student at the University of Montana, initially avoided being arrested in connection to the apartment explosion that we reported on two weeks ago. As the smoke was still clearing on the scene, she readily admitted that she made a conscious decision to “just chill” with her infant child in the same apartment where the highly explosive hash oil extraction was being performed. Still, she walked away free…until last Friday.


A teenager who died after she attended the Hard Summer festival in August succumbed to an ecstasy overdose, the L.A. County Department of Coroner ruled this month.
Despite a common misperception in the rave scene that MDMA deaths are caused mostly by adulterated pills, toxicology tests turned up no other drugs in the system of 19-year-old Emily Tran, Capt. John Kades told L.A. Weekly today. More at the Informer.

The most popular ball sport on any college campus these days.


According to a University of Michigan study of about 1,100 college students nationwide as part of the ongoing, government-funded Monitoring the Future study, 51 percent of all full-time students admitting that they’ve expanded their minds at least once with a little toke. Researchers say pot use on campus is up to the highest it’s been since the study started in 2006, when 34 percent said they had smoked pot at least once.
And that’s the part of the study that will get the most amount of press, of course (especially since the researchers put out a press release with that exact angle). But the real story here is that, while alcohol by students dipped some, 63 percent of all students still say they’ve drank in the last 30 days with a majority of them drinking to excess.


News reports this week indicate that one of the Cowboys’ few defensive bright spots from last season, cornerback Orlando Scandrick, has been suspended for the first four games of the 2014 regular season for violating the NFL’s performance-enhancing substance abuse policy. Scandrick has already lost his appeal in the matter, so it looks like the Cowboys will be stuck with whatever the mercurial Mo Claiborne can give the on the outside for the first quarter of the season.
The details of Scandrick’s indiscretion — if his agent and ESPN’s Ed Werder are to be believed — are pretty mundane. While on vacation in Mexico with an ex-girlfriend, Scandrick, or someone in his party, mixed a drug — reported by Werder to be MDMA — purchased from a street vendor into a cocktail he was drinking. More at the Dallas Observer.

For over four decades now, advocates for the responsible use of marijuana have been fighting an uphill battle against the Drug Enforcement Agency and the U.S. government in an attempt to get weed moved off of the Schedule I list of drugs. The goal for groups like Americans for Safe Access (ASA) is to get pot moved down to at least Schedule II, where it can be studied and prescribed more effectively.
Founded in 2002, ASA has been helping to lead the way in cannabis law reform, lending their influence and expertise to local City Council decisions, all the way up to Supreme Court cases. It is there, with the U.S. Supreme Court, that Americans for Safe Access currently finds themselves fighting for the rightful rescheduling of marijuana.

Opposing Views

More Than 200,000 Veterans Behind Bars; One in Five Current Conflict Veterans in VA Care Diagnosed With Substance Abuse Disorder
Report Calls for Alternatives to Incarceration; Increased Access to Overdose Prevention Programs and Medication-Assisted Therapy; and Medical Marijuana and MDMA for PTSD
The Drug Policy Alliance, an organization advocating alternatives to the Drug War, has released an updated and revised edition of their seminal 2009 report, “Healing a Broken System.” The report examines the plight of returning veterans who struggle with incarceration and psychological wounds of war such as addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder – and suggests reforms that could improve the health and preserve the freedom of American soldiers returning from war zones and transitioning back to civilian life.

Mashable

Includes Largest Gift Ever to the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS)
This year, five leading nonprofits at the forefront of health and drug policy reform will benefit from a generous bequest of approximately $10 million from the estate of software pioneer Ashawna (Shawn) Hailey. The gift will dramatically increase these organizations’ ability to reform government policies and public attitudes about health and drug policy.
 
Half of the total bequest — approximately $5 million — will benefit the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a non-profit research and educational organization working with the FDA and international regulatory agencies to develop psychedelics and marijuana into prescription treatments for patients with unmet medical needs.

Casey Prather/The Towerlight

​Medical marijuana advocates continue to push for the legalization of cannabis for licensed patients in Maryland through a proposed bill, The Medical Marijuana Act, HB 15.

The bill could allow the medicinal use of cannabis in Maryland as early as September, reports Gabrielle LePore at the Towson University student newspaper, The Towerlight. State licensed growers would cultivate the marijuana if the bill is passed.
HB 15 is a step toward increasing the quality of life for those who could benefit from medical marijuana, according to Donna Cox, a professor in Towson U.’s department of health science.
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