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Four weeks from now, voters in Michigan, Missouri, North Dakota and Utah will all be deciding measures that would lift legal restrictions on marijuana — but all in different ways. And Colorado, too, has another marijuana-related issue on the ballot.

A Michigan ballot proposal would set up a licensed retail system similar to Colorado’s, while North Dakota voters will decide whether to allow marijuana possession and distribution (but without a comprehensive business licensing system), as well as expunging certain marijuana-related crimes.

A margin of 7,600 votes determined whether the retail marijuana market in Pueblo County would survive this election.

Question 200 appeared on the county ballot after opposition groups campaigned against the legal marijuana industry. If passed, 200 would have eliminated the cultivation of recreational marijuana, ended retail sales, closed existing cannabis businesses and left the 1,300 people working in the industry unemployed.

Cities and counties across Colorado have ballot measures related to marijuana regulation. Many of them involve adding additional sales taxes or excise taxes, which are paid when unprocessed marijuana is sold or transferred from a cultivation facility or site to a retail store, manufacturing facility or another facility. But there are also measures that would allow — or ban — the sale of marijuana altogether.

The towns of Palisade, Dinosaur and Englewood are considering allowing retail stores within town limits, while Pueblo voters will decide whether to ban all retail marijuana sales and production in Pueblo County. The only marijuana-related measure on Denver’s ballot concerns public marijuana use in designated areas. Here are the details, county by county: 

He’s not the only one.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

Dennis Peron, the celebrated cannabis activist and backer of 1996’s Proposition 215, which legalized MED in California, opposes the state’s coming REC vote. “In 1996, it was like a dark room had been left for so long without any light. I let a little light in. A light of compassion, hope and empowerment. We empowered the patients and the voters and the people that don’t believe marijuana is a crime,” Peron said. “But Prop. 64 will destroy that power that we’ve had for the last 20 years.”

Grassroots Colorado was a marijuana club closed after a 4/20 weekend raid in 2015.

Update: The Denver Responsible Use Initiative, a Denver NORML-backed proposal intended to create venues for the social consumption of cannabis in the Mile High City, fell short of qualifying for the November ballot — and attorney Judd Golden, who was both the author of the initiative and one of its primary proponents, has a major takeaway from the experience.

“It highlights the need to increase voter registration in Denver,” he says. “We were just shocked by the number of people who said they were registered voters who weren’t.”

 

Governor Ducey imagines Arizona students lounging around, stoned out of their minds on marijuana-laced lollipops.

A Scottsdale mom worries about pot stores on every corner.

The Arizona Public Health Association sees benefits as well as risks.

Arizona voters will find these opinions and more among the pro and con arguments for Arizona’s marijuana-legalization initiative that the state published last week. It’s an entertaining, albeit lopsided, glimpse into various views on the issue. Advocates for making weed as legal in Arizona as firearms or alcohol will find plenty of reefer madness within the arguments, which are dominated by the “con” side.

Governor Ducey imagines Arizona students lounging around, stoned out of their minds on marijuana-laced lollipops.

A Scottsdale mom worries about pot stores on every corner.

The Arizona Public Health Association sees benefits as well as risks.

Arizona voters will find these opinions and more among the pro and con arguments for Arizona’s marijuana-legalization initiative that the state published last week. It’s an entertaining, albeit lopsided, glimpse into various views on the issue.

We told you earlier this week about marijuana decriminalization measures in Berkley, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge and several other towns in Michigan and suburbs of Detroit. In total, there were 11 measures scattered around the state.
Well, voters did the right thing in six of those communities last night and passed bills lowering or eliminating marijuana penalties for small amounts of cannabis.

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