Search Results: montgomery (52)


In his heyday, Montgomery Chitty was a prominent Aspen resident and pal of area celebrities such as the late Hunter S. Thompson and Ed Bradley.
Lately, however, he’s been hanging out with inmates, owing to his conviction in relation to a cocaine operation that ran between Aspen and L.A. for years — and his attempt to get his twenty-year sentence tossed or reduced was rejected after he failed to convince a judge the punishment was influenced by “mean spirited retaliation.” The Latest Word has more.

Among other things, they are preparing safety guides for “trimmigrants”

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek

Reveal follows up on its investigation of sex abuse of trimmigrants in California’s Emerald Triangle, with an update on how communities in the region have responded.

Massachusetts became the first state on the east coast to legalize REC, despite opposition from the state’s most prominent politicians, both Democrats and Republicans. Dispensaries could open as soon as January 2018.

All four states voting on MED approved it. In Florida, voters legalized MED with 71% in favor. In Arkansas, a MED initiative has a comfortable lead with most precincts reporting. North Dakota’s MED initiative passed with about 64% of the vote and Montana’s Initiative to expand MED access also passed comfortably.

Each of the MED states also voted for Donald Trump, who is now president-elect.

It looks like the proposed REC business bans in Pueblo, the Colorado industry’s secondary hub, failed. I wrote about the situation for the L.A. Times.

There were numerous local votes in Oregon on the industry’s status in communities. See the results here.

The Eureka Times-Standard explains your rights in California post Proposition 64. Public consumption will not be allowed except in licensed businesses, which will open in 2018 at the earliest.

Stocks in private prison companies jumped following Donald Trump’s victory. Racial disparities in criminal enforcement remain a concern.

The Nation profiles Bill Montgomery (R), the anti-pot Phoenix prosecutor who won re-election.

An odor problem has earned a Boulder grow $14,000 in fines.

The NFL Player’s Association said it would explore MED as a pain management tool. The league isn’t budging, for now.

Playboy calls legalization one of the election’s “ silver linings.

Colorado Harvest Company and O.pen vape were among the major donors to Levitt Pavilion amphitheater, a new venue for free concerts in Denver.

Ray Stern | Toke of the Town

Activists who oppose a measure to legalize marijuana in Arizona were excited to let the world know about a news article shared on social media that blasts the notion that passage would guarantee a tax windfall.

The Twitter site for Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy, a well-funded group headed up by Yavapai County Attorney Sheila Polk and radio talk-show host Seth Leibsohn, shared the July 14 article entitled “The Vicious Truth About Pot Revenue” three times.

Politicians have not caught up with public opinion. 

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

A new poll found that for the first time, Republicans narrowly favor legalizing marijuana, 45% to 42%. Last week, however, Republicans voted against including support for MED in their party platform. As far as I saw, the plant went unmentioned at the convention.

Hillary Clinton named Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine (D) as her running mate. Speaking at a high school in April, Kaine said he favors “drastic changes in sentencing laws…[but] wouldn’t vote for a law at the federal or state level that would decriminalize marijuana.” Kaine has a NORML rating of F.

Donald Trump has a NORML rating of C+Hillary Clinton gets a B+Libertarian Gary Johnson scores an A+.

Leafly meets Ann Lee, founder of Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition (RAMP). Lee, 86, attended the GOP convention as an alternate in the Texas delegation. Her son Richard Lee founded the trade school Oaksterdam University in Oakland.

Decriminalization appears to have support from the Texas Association of Business and  bipartisan support in the Texas legislature. Gov. Greg Abbott (R) opposes legalization.

Marijuana.com digs up that the DEA has reduced the size of its 2017 cannabis order from last year. This hints, the piece suggests, that the agency will not reschedule. The DEA gets its weed from a facility at the University of Mississippi, the only federally legal grow in the country.

Fifty-one percent of voters oppose Massachusetts’ REC initiative and 41% percent support. The numbers are similar in Arizona.

An Arizona judge will hear cannabis-opponents in a case that could block the upcoming REC vote. They argue that the 100-word petition voters signed didn’t adequately explain the effects of legalization. Plaintiffs include Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery (R), Phoenix’s lead prosecutor.

Last year, before a weed convention in Phoenix, Montgomery offered “An aside, just a polite warning to folks traveling here…I can’t confirm or deny whether or not local or federal law enforcement may be on hand in an undercover capacity. So welcome to Phoenix, enjoy your stay, but be careful.”

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) opposes the state’s MED initiative. In Wisconsin, a poll found that REC legalization has 59% support. Activists are collecting signatures for a MED initiative in Oklahoma.

Florida’s first CBD dispensary opens this week. The state is expected to vote on MED in November.

Andre Maestas, from Facebook.


The Maricopa County Attorney’s Office (yes, that Maricopa County) is prosecuting a college student with a medical-marijuana card for felony possession of less than a gram of weed.
Andre Lee Juwaun Maestas, a 19-year-old Arizona State University student, could end up with a felony on his record, probation and stiff fines because of the March discovery of about .6 grams of marijuana and some smoking paraphernalia in his dorm room.

YouTube
Failed reality TV show “Texas Takedown” lands cops in court


Apparently full to the brim with shows about everything from hoarders to housewives, reality TV producers in the state of Texas have found a new format to film – the home invasion.
The proposed show is called “Texas Takedown” and it follows a crew-cut band of Lone Star state lawmen as they kick down the doors of unsuspecting Texans from Austin to the Alamo, hoping that whatever waits on the other side is at least good for ratings.
On September 22nd of 2011, just after 10 o’clock pm, fame came crashing through the front door of the home belonging to then 59-year old Perla Carr.


A 50-acre pot farm with nearly 3,450 plants and a street value of $1.75 million was raided by municipal, county and state authorities in Brenham, Texas Monday.
No suspects were located in the seizure, which is the sixth “marijuana growing operation shut down in Washington County since January 2013,” according to the Montgomery County Police Reporter. More over at the Houston Press.


In what must be the biggest shocker in the history of the War on Drugs, a bunch of cops and county attorneys in Arizona don’t want pot legalized in Arizona. We’re kidding, of course. It’s not shocking at all.
The Arizona County Attorney and Sheriff’s Association yesterday took a “voice vote” on a resolution that officially opposes marijuana legalization in Arizona. The do-nothing resolution comes as a push for the legalization of limited amounts of cannabis for adults 21 and up in 2016 is starting to build.

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