Search Results: montgomery (52)

Gene Walsh/Times Herald
State Senator Daylin Leach: “It is time for Pennsylvania to be a leader in jettisoning this modern-day prohibition” 

A state senator in Pennsylvania on Wednesday announced plans to introduce legislation that would legalize marijuana in Pennsylvania. State Senator Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery/Delaware) is currently looking for cosponsors for the bill.

“This past November, the people of Washington state and Colorado voted to fully legalize marijuana,” Sen. Leach said, reports The Sentinel. “Other places, including California, have had de facto legalization for some time.”
“This week, I will introduce legislation which would have Pennsylvania join these other states in ending this modern-day prohibition,” Leach said. “My bill will legalize the consumption of marijuana for adults over the age of 21, without regard to the purpose of that consumption.”

Jane Phillips/The New Mexican
Steve Jenison, who worked as medical director for New Mexico’s medical marijuana program until his retirement, will voice his support for the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act, Issue 5

Arkansas Doctors Show Support for Issue 5
A press conference featuring Arkansas doctors voicing their support of Issue 5, the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act, will be held Thursday, November 1. Dr. Steve Jenison, chair of the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Advisory Board, will be the featured speaker. Dr. Jenison will speak about the success of the New Mexico program — its regulations, oversight and impact on the State of New Mexico, and about the similarity of the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act to New Mexico’s own program.
Dr. Jenison worked at New Mexico’s Department of Health as the medical director for the medicinal cannabis program before he retired.

AP

Survivors of the Drug War, community leaders from United States and Mexico to walk across historic Edmund Pettus Bridge to call for an end to Drug War that has devastated black & latino communities and killed more than 60,000 in Mexico
In act of solidarity, U.S.-Mexico Caravan for Peace joins local leaders to condemn rampant violence and mass incarceration caused by failed War on Drugs.
The Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity — made up of Mexican survivors of the Drug War and activists from both Mexico and the United States — on Wednesday will join local civil rights leaders to travel over the historic Edmund Pettus Bridge in order to draw attention to the more than 60,000 people killed in drug-war-related violence in Mexico since 2006, as well as the devastating and systemic racism caused by the failed war on drugs in the U.S.

James King/Phoenix New Times
Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne is busily trying to block the medical marijuana law approved by state voters two years ago

None of the shops has yet opened its doors; not a single patient has yet been sold a single joint of marijuana. But Arizona’s top cop on Thursday asked a judge to void a key provision in the state’s two-year-old medical marijuana law, arguing that judges are legally powerless to authorize anyone to sell cannabis as long as it remains illegal under federal law.

Attorney General Tom Horne’s real goal is to get a ruling declaring the state and federal laws are in conflict, reports Howard Fischer at Capitol Media Services. Horne said that would allow him to direct the Arizona Department of Health Services to stop the process already underway of licensing up to 126 marijuana dispensaries.

Caravan For Peace
The Caravan for Peace with Justice Arrives in Los Angeles today, calling for an end to the Drug War which has killed 60,000 in Mexico and incarcerated millions of Americans

Caravan for Peace with Justice Arrives in Los Angeles Monday Calling for End to Drug War that Has Killed 60,000 in Mexico and Incarcerated Millions of Americans
Hollywood Film Directors and Actors including Kate Del Castilo, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Diego Luna, Alfonso Cuarón, among Celebrities Who Will join the Caravan at Various events in Los Angeles Monday and Tuesday 
Javier Sicilia and other Victims from Mexico and United States to Make 6,000-mile Journey Through 20 Cities to Honor Lives Lost to Drug War, Culminating in International Day of Action in Washington D.C.
A broad bi-national coalition of more than 100 U.S. civil society organizations, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), Global Exchange and the Drug Policy Alliance, on Sunday joined the Mexican Movement for Peace with Justice & Dignity (MPJD) to embark on the “Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity” across the United States.

Caravan for Peace

“Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity” to Embark from San Diego August 12 Calling for End to Drug War that Has Killed 60,000 in Mexico
Javier Sicilia and other Victims from Mexico and United States to Make 6,000-mile Journey Through 20 Cities to Honor Lives Lost to Drug War, Culminating in International Day of Action in Washington D.C.
Caravan Proposes Comprehensive Solutions to Violence: Explore Drug Regulation, End Weapons Trafficking, Prevent Money Laundering, Eliminate U.S. Military Aid, and Ensure the Safety of Migrants
On Sunday, August 12, a broad bi-national coalition of more than 100 U.S. civil society organizations, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), Global Exchange and the Drug Policy Alliance will join the Mexican Movement for Peace with Justice & Dignity (MPJD) to embark on the “Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity” across the United States. 
The Caravan will be led by renowned Mexican poet Javier Sicilia, who emerged as a leader of the MPJD after his son Juan Francisco was killed in senseless prohibition-related violence last year, together with  family members of Mexican victims of the drug war. They will unite with victims and supporters from the United States for a month-long voyage across the continental United States.

Aeon Byte Gnostic Radio

Jack’s Timeline of the History of Cannabis


By Jack Rikess
Toke of the Town

Northern California Correspondent


Your Higher Power provides Cannabis to the Earth.
2737 BCE:  Shen Nung’s Pen Ts’ao, in China, refers to Cannabis as a “superior” herb in the world’s first medical text, or pharmacopoeia.
For the next several thousand years, Cannabis and Hemp are utilized in almost every major civilization in the Old World including everything from paper to sails.
1632 AD, America gets a new cash crop when the Pilgrims bring Cannabis to the New World in their carry-on luggage.
1776 AD: Declaration of Independence drafted on hemp paper.

THC Finder

​San Francisco has started back issuing medical marijuana dispensary permits again, after a recent California Supreme Court decision allowing the shops to stay open — for now.

The city’s permitting process had been on hold for a few months after the state appeals court ruling in Pack v. Long Beach, reports Chris Roberts at the SF Weekly. That ruling — which held that cities and counties can’t regulate marijuana, since it’s against federal law — led local governments throughout the state to suspend, repeal, or reconsider their dispensary regulations.
Since the state Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal, the lower court’s ruling has become invalidated, according to a spokesman for San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera’s office. So the S.F. Department of Health’s medical marijuana dispensary permitting process can start back as normal, and several proposed shops which had been put on hold can finally receive the go-ahead to open their doors.

Michael Montgomery/California Watch
A federal drug agent stands in a marijuana field near Redding. The 2010 raid led to federal charges against 27 people.

​The pattern of the American government using domestic spying on its own citizens — begun after the 9/11 attacks and the PATRIOT Act — may soon be going to a new level. Congress may empower federal intelligence agencies to participate in the struggle against marijuana cultivation in national forests and on other federal land.

One provision in the 2012 intelligence authorization bill calls on James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, to report on how federal spy agencies can help park rangers, fish and wildlife wardens, and other federal agents eradicate cannabis gardens, report Andrew Becker and Michael Montgomery at California Watch.
The bill also directs the top spy to work with federal public land managers to identify intelligence and information-sharing gaps related to drug trafficking. The House passed its version of the bill, HR 1892, in September; it is now before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.