Search Results: oxycontin (53)

oxycontin_DEA.jpg

A looming trial in Los Angeles involves: five medical professional defendants, including a Huntington Beach resident; Medicare and Medi-Cal being stung for $2.7 million in Oxycontin reimbursements; billings for $4.6 million in medical procedures that were not needed or never performed; and 900,000 Oxy pills eventually being sold on the streets, according to federal prosecutors. Two other Orange Countians were convicted in the wide-ranging case.
OC Weekly has more.

heroin-intervention.jpeg
Intervention Services

New England Journal of Medicine: New OxyContin Abuse-Deterrent Formulation Drove Surge in Heroin Use 
New Research Indicates Former OxyContin Users Now Using Easier-to-Get Heroin
Drug prohibition does not work. Due to a steady, base-level demand for narcotics, when drug warriors try to stem the tide in one area, it only diverts demand to somewhere else — sometimes making the problem worse.
In a perfect illustration of this principle, the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday released research showing that the recent introduction of the reformulated, abuse-deterrent version of OxyContin is linked to increases in heroin use.
In a letter-to-the-editor appearing in the Journal, Theodore Cicero, Ph.D., Matthew Ellis, M.P.E., and Hilary Surratt, Ph.D., wrote, “Our data show that an abuse-deterrent formulation successfully reduced abuse of a specific drug but also generated an unanticipated outcome: replacement of the abuse-deterrent formulation with alternative opioid medications and heroin, a drug that may pose a much greater overall risk to public health than OxyContin.”
sessionsGage Skidmore

It’s part of a whole PR campaign.

Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.

Ahead of his confirmation hearing for Attorney General, a public relations campaign is trying to depict Sen. Jeff Sessions as  emphatically not a racist. He has long been dogged by such accusations, due in part to a statement that he was ok with the Ku Klux Klan, until he heard that they smoke pot.

Rolling Stone envisions the war on drugs under Attorney General Sessions.

Oregon is  revising its product testing rules again, following complaints from companies. Nevada companies call for  strict product testing.

The Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, N.Y.) reports on “ progress and hurdles” in the New York MED program. For more  see here.

Maine REC opponents  cancelled their recall effort. Gov. Paul LePage (R) said that with REC there’s no longer a need for a MED program. A prominent New Hampshire state senator  will propose a REC bill.

Canada.com looks at how legalization up north  could alter Canadian/American relations.

An Arizona judge ruled that local officials  can’t use federal law to block MED dispensaries.

The city of Copenhagen is pursuing a  longshot legalization push in an effort to reduce gang warfare.

Caribbean nation Dominica will  consider MED legalization next year.

Denver cannabis law firm Hoban Law Group  may sue the DEA over its recent CBD ruling.

Purdue Pharma, which makes Oxycontin, is  expanding overseas. In the U.S., the L.A. Times remarks, opioids are a “dying business.”

Hound Labs and Cannabix Technologies are  racing to perfect a cannabis breathalyzer.

Boston is another potential “ cannabis capital.” Canadian businesses are  preparing for legalization.

CBD pet treats are becoming big business.

Older adults are  using more cannabis, and binge drinking more too. Cannabis use  may not be a good idea for those seeking long-term abatement of depression and anxiety, Colorado researchers found.

Modern Farmer hangs out with  Bear Real, a Colorado hemp scientist.

canada-marijuana-1.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

Possibly the largest legal pot company in the world.

Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.

Canada’s Canopy Growth Corp. will acquire Mettrum Health Corp. for C$430M, creating a dominant Canadian player.

Vice examines 280E, the tax code provision used to tax marijuana businesses more than other businesses.

Warehouse rents are skyrocketing in legal states. But the New York Stock Exchange IPO of cannabis real estate trust Innovative Industrial Properties went nowhere, following the Sessions nomination.

The BBC calls Albania, a small, poor country in southeast Europe, the continent’s “ outdoor cannabis capital.

The industry could create an opportunity for clean energy technologies like “ renewable microgrids.

LAWeekly asks if small cannabis businesses can survive legalization.

Accounting Today says, “ The Cannabis Industry Needs Accountants.

Pot was a hot topic at the 2016 Wine Industry Expo. For more see here.

Financial firm Cowen said legalization is bad for beer sales. MarketWatch disagrees.

Dispensaries offered discounts for “ Green Friday.” (The shopping day after Thanksgiving.)

The BBC profiles John Stewart, an executive who was CEO of Purdue Pharma, which sells the opioid Oxycontin and now leads a MED company in Canada.

There’s an incubator that aims to turn formerly-incarcerated drug dealers into legal entrepreneurs.

Century Bank in Massachusetts openly works with pot businesses.

A new site called The Cannifornian will cover legalization in the state.  Parent company Digital First Media also owns The Denver Post and its site The Cannabist.

RAND Corporation scholar Beau Kilmer editorializes in favor of the state legalization experiments.

Denver’s social use measure may face legal challenges. Juneau, Ak.’s first dispensary opened and sold out in three hours.

Maryland’s pot regulator has hired a diversity consultant, after it failed to award any of its initial 30 licenses to African-Americans. It has also given preliminary approval for 102 MED dispensary licenses. The names will be made public this week.

Florida’s MED community has few friends in Tallahassee. The new law will also undermine the state’s largely disregarded bong ban.

The Cannabist meets Rilie Ray Morgan, the 66-year old man who championed MED in North Dakota.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) is launching a new effort to use pot taxes to build apartments for the chronically homeless.

Massachusetts may delay implementing aspects of its REC law. Maine will recount its REC vote. MED legalization is on the table in Ireland and South Africa.

British politician Nick Clegg called for legalization. Vice sketches out what a legal U.K. market for recreational drugs could look like.

canada-flag.image-large.gif

The Canandian health department has issued a warning to the country’s medical cannabis growers and sellers, saying that advertising the benefits of medical cannabis online and in print has gone too far.
Health Canada sent letters to 20 licensed pot growers that outline how and when they can advertise their products – including banning photos of actual buds or linking to any third-party websites that the government deems to be “promoting” weed. Producers can’t even talk about which strains help certain conditions.

pills-commonsSageRoss.jpg
Photo by Sage Ross, CC by-sa


It’s an almost cliched stoner adage that Big Pharma is actively working to keep marijuana illegal so they can keep you on their pills. We’ve all had the at least one encounter with a pro-pot zealot who will delve deep into this subject at the drop of a hat.
But the thing is: it’s all true. Take Dr. Herbert Kleber, a leading anti-pot academic from Columbia University who has fought hard against marijuana legalization for years – all while on the payroll of Purdue Pharma, which makes OxyContin, as well as several other high-profile painkiller manufacturers. He’s not alone, either.

Toke2014-PTSD.jpg


More than 20 percent of all vets coming home from the Middle East report at least some symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. For some, it shows in depression and anxiety or an inability to function normally in day-to-day civilian life. For others, it’s more grave.
After two tours in Afghanistan, Matt Kahl says the only way out he saw after returning home was through suicide. He tried and failed, and likely would have tried again if it wasn’t for one thing: cannabis.

samiam.png
http://seuss.wikia.com/


You might think that drunkenly plowing his car into the Capitol building at 3am, then going on to evade prosecution and finish out his term as a U.S. Congressman, only to become a leading voice opposing marijuana legalization would make Patrick Kennedy the biggest delta-bravo in Project SAM.
Ok, he might still be, but boy does he have some competition from his partner, and co-founder of “Smart Approaches to Marijuana”, Kevin Sabet.
The PhD associate professor has a mind-numbing piece up over at Huffington Post right now, instructing the rest of us on how to talk about pot. It’s a 5-step plan … 7 steps short of the one Patrick Kennedy is somehow above, but would have no problem imposing on you.

Last month, the Connecticut state Department of Consumer Protection granted the first four licenses for marijuana producers, and they plan to award up to five additional licenses for marijuana sellers by the end of next month. With cannabis already decriminalized in the state, and a heavy liberal bias in the region politically, one may wonder what is taking medical marijuana so long.

MMJsignsmall.jpg
Neeta Lind/Flickr


The grow facilities will be considered “pharmaceutical manufacturers” by the state, with all medication produced being put through a mandatory testing process before it gets to the dispensaries. Once on the shelves, sellers will be subject to incredibly strict regulations aimed directly at preventing diversion of medical marijuana to the black market in the state.
Still, with some of the nation’s most strict regulations in place, the usual suspects are screaming from the rooftops that allowing any medical marijuana in Connecticut is going to pose a huge risk for…wait for it…”the kids”.

1 2 3 6