Search Results: plants (887)

jason-dunn-us-attorney-mitchell-2019 (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Colorado law enforcement officers, district attorneys and federal authorities collaborated on what they describe as the largest collective marijuana bust in the state’s history.

During a press conference on May 24, Jason Dunn, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado, discussed the two-year investigation that included nearly 250 location searches in eight counties across the state and led to 42 arrests after raids over the last three days.

home growFlickr/Mark Eggrole

Government reports recently revealed that over 665,000 pounds of legal marijuana were sold in Colorado last year, but that number hardly accounted for every sale in the state. Although market research shows that Colorado’s marijuana black market has become significantly smaller than the rest of the country’s since retail dispensaries showed up in 2014, it hasn’t evaporated altogether.

Various law enforcement agencies collaborated on a network of raids on illegal marijuana grows in at least five towns and two counties on August 9, as first reported by the Denver Post — and the marijuana seized from the raids could be small potatoes compared to what’s happening on public land in Colorado.

Laura Scudder

Often times, newer growers tend to believe that if you put up some lights and feed your plants good nutrients, you will get big yields. While these are factors in plant growth, the reality is that maximizing yields is about fostering photosynthesis and plant metabolism. That means maintaining temperatures, humidity, and adequate carbon dioxide levels. It is a delicate dance between balancing environmental factors, providing rich nutrients and listening to your plants that will ultimately lead to a bountiful harvest. Staying on top of CO2 levels while growing cannabis indoors, when combined with the right cultivation technique, can deliver you truly enviable yields.

Understanding the Basics of Photosynthesis

Anyone can throw together a rudimentary cannabis grow room, however, to get the most out of your garden, you have to understand the basic processes that lead to happy and healthy plants. Photosynthesis is the process by which all plants take in carbon dioxide, sunlight and water and convert them into energy. It is this energy that turns all of your hard work into the dense buds that you will come to harvest later. Increasing yields are all about maximizing the energy that your plant metabolizes from the nutrients you feed, and the environment that you create.

The Benefits of Increasing CO2

Optimal conditions for a cannabis grow are between 75 and 85 degrees, depending on strain, stage and a handful of other factors. Humidity levels should remain around 40-50% during flowering. There is an intimate relationship between temperature and humidity, however, the one thing that often gets left out of this equation is CO2. Carbon dioxide has a direct impact on the rate of metabolism in your cannabis plants. As temperatures rise, in order to keep up with the demand for increased metabolism, there has to be an injection of CO2. Increased CO2 facilitates the process of photosynthesis, and as a result can not only affect plant size, but the quality of cannabinoids contained within.

The Luxury of Indoor Cultivation

Indoors you have the luxury of being able to boost CO2 levels at will. This is one benefit to indoor cultivation. Increased CO2 levels, besides facilitating metabolic process, also aid the plant in fighting adverse environmental conditions. In a manner of speaking, CO2 helps to immunize the plant from things like air and soil contaminants, adverse reactions to physical damage, shifting temperature shock and a host of other potential problems. Carbon dioxide levels will often be the determining factor as to whether or not a plant pulls through in rough conditions.

Finding a Balance

Outdoors, the carbon dioxide levels are about 400 ppm, or parts per million. Plants themselves can handle a much higher concentration. To achieve optimal growth, indoor cannabis grow rooms should maintain a CO2 ppm of around 1200-1500. This means having sufficient light to bring temperatures up enough to balance the increased CO2. Finding the right balance between temperature, humidity and CO2 levels is the key to maximizing your plants’ metabolic processes and achieving the yields of which you once only dreamed.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I’m confused about the plant count for cannabis home grows in Denver. Are they different from the State of Colorado’s limits?
Pat S.

Dear Pat: Many towns and municipalities throughout Colorado, including Denver, have plant limits that differ from the state’s. For a definitive answer on Denver, I reached out to Dan Rowland, citywide communications advisor for Denver’s Office of Marijuana Policy, who says this: “The answer is yes, they are different and can vary from city to city. In Denver, adults may grow up to six plants, but it is illegal for there to be more than twelve plants in any residence, regardless of how many people live there and regardless of their medical patient/caregiver status and/or individual plant-count allowances. For growing in non-residential-zone lots (and not in licensed cultivation businesses), adults may grow up to six plants, but it’s illegal to have more than 36 plants per zone lot, regardless of how many people are growing there.”

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: What is the number of plants one can cultivate with a medical marijuana card? I’ve heard you can have up to 75 if you’re a caregiver, but I’ve also heard Colorado will be setting a state maximum of twelve.
Pete

Dear Pete: Current medical marijuana caregivers can actually have up to 99 plants for a maximum of five patients, thanks to a bill passed in 2015 — but the clamps have been tightening ever since. Caregivers with extended plant counts of more than 36 plants in their homes must now register with the state, and Governor John Hickenlooper has been vocal about further cutting those counts in 2017 because of concerns about the black market.

The rumblings you’ve been hearing about a twelve-plant maximum are true: The state has been pushing to limit a patient’s plant count to twelve in private homes this year, as well as to adopt a more detailed patient registration system and ban recreational co-ops. If you don’t think twelve is enough, try to get an extended plant count while you still can; they’re not dead yet.

pdw_stripKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

A specialized spectrum of invisible light that will kill all the pathogens in your grow: That’s what SpectrumGro promises the Pathogen Death Wand will be.

The Colorado-based SpectrumGro markets and distributes rods about an inch and a half thick and 48 inches long. They’re installed two feet from the crop — above it, under it or to the side — and once they’re turned on, they get to work eliminating pathogens in the plants and in the soil. The light attacks mold, bacteria, fungi, powdery mildew and most kinds of yeast.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: Someone recently told me that I have too many plants in my basement grow. I live with two other adults in Five Points and have twelve plants locked up downstairs. I’m good, right?
The Cheese

Dear Cheese: Colorado law allows adults 21 and over to grow up to six plants in their homes, and if you have two or more adults in the house, then you can grow twelve if the plants are for more than one of the residents. Denver still abides by that rule, but not all towns do. Your friend might live in a nearby town, like Centennial or Aurora, that has different rules and limits on residential growing. Although cultivating cannabis in your own home is allowed in the state constitution, the amendment that legalized it also gave municipalities the right to change those rules, just as they have the right to ban dispensaries. Your friend might also be under the impression that all twelve are for you, which is technically illegal. But as long as one of your roommates will lay claim to half of the crop, then you’re in the clear. Just make sure that any inquiring police officer is aware of that, too.

mayflowerKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Aurora’s Mayflower Farms is one of the largest grow operations in the state, and it’s getting even bigger. In November, Mayflower will add an extraction lab for concentrates as well as a kitchen at its facility; in the new year, it will open its own retail store.

In February 2015, the new cannabis company took over an old Mayflower Moving warehouse (hence the name) and started overhauling the place; it had plants in the ground eleven months later, says CEO Bruce Douglass. It currently has five rooms totaling about 3,000 square feet devoted to growing flower, and has gone through eight harvests since January. Each harvest garners about 100 pounds of product. Today Mayflower has 3,600 plants in its facility, but come November it will up that to 6,000.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I see these scam ads on Craigslist that rip off folks just looking for a little relief. It used to be just regular face-to-face local delivery, but now it’s a constant scam pretending that they’ll ship products out of state. Does any police department ever track down these scammers?
Got the T-Shirt

Dear T-Shirt: There are simply too many scams on Craigslist for local law enforcement to go after everyone, especially if those scammers aren’t on a computer anywhere near Colorado. People get duped by deals on fake used cars, rental-home deposits, entertainment tickets and damn near every other product that can be bought, sold or traded secondhand — and marijuana is no different.

Cannabis_Garden.jpg

This past Friday, IRIS Fire Investigations held a “Hash Oil Hazards Training for the Insurance Industry” seminar. The seminar focused primarily on the ways that making hash oil at home (typically using butane) can go terribly wrong, and what investigators at a suspicious fire should look for. But there was also an interesting discussion involving personal property, standard homeowner insurance coverage and cannabis plants.

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