Search Results: recreational (848)

Kate McKee Simmons

Back in February, Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet were among the eighteen senators who urged the Senate Committee on Appropriations to “respect states’ laws regarding the regulation of marijuana.” But this week, those laws didn’t get any respect.

In the wake of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ rescinding the Cole Memorandum and other Obama-era protections, the senators’ goal was to make sure that states that have legalized recreational marijuana, such as Colorado, would be protected from punitive action by the Department of Justice. “It is our hope that the fiscal year 2018 appropriations will alleviate the turbulence the attorney general’s abrupt decision has caused and that the appropriations will help preserve the strong regulatory frameworks the states have created,” they wrote.

img_8015Kate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Thornton is finally getting a recreational dispensary. On March 23, the Thornton City Council approved a license for its first retail pot store, but not without some hesitation from councilmembers.

The Marijuana Local Licensing Authority had convened a meeting with Mayor Heidi K. Williams and the council to hear testimony from each of the four dispensaries requesting a license from the city, which had previously had a moratorium on recreational marijuana. That ban was lifted last August, and the applicants all came armed with community-engagement plans to explain what each business would bring to the town.

The evening began with a PowerPoint presentation by Rocky Road Remedies, outlining a $12,000 restorative-justice program the company would like to introduce in schools. After that, Stephanie Hull, director of operations for Rocky Road, was questioned for over an hour by councilmembers.

15000009_1604946479810387_8509006308196225342_oPhoto courtesy of Olio on Facebook

The two founders of one of the most highly regarded concentrate labs in the state have gone their separate ways. A fan favorite, 710 Labs won the High Times People’s Choice for Best Hash in 2014; it became known for its golden-tinged, crystal-clear products that include wax, sugar wax, ice wax, live resin, shatter and more varieties. Now the creators of this wax company have split up, and in Colorado, co-founder Wade Sanders has created a new company: Olio. 710 Labs still exists, run by co-founder Brad Melshenker, but is currently not operating in Colorado.

Until recently, the company had produced medical concentrates — but last month Olio began selling its product recreationally, with the same high-quality standards. A pioneer in the field of concentrates, Olio continues to play with innovation. It’s now creating two new types of wax — Sauce and Distillate— with the aim of perfecting terpene flavor and achieving high THC percentages. Sauce, which has a texture similar to sugar wax with a liquid film on top, hit shelves just last year and is currently for sale both recreationally and medically. Distillate is still in its final stages before sales begin.

Westword sat down with Olio GM Renee Sanders to talk about the new company, these new products, the future of concentrates in the cannabis world, and the importance of emphasizing quality over quantity.

reschedulingLindsey Bartlett

In November, Massachusetts voters approved recreational marijuana; that state was supposed to start legal sales in January 2018 — but now that date has been pushed back at least six months.

Personal possession, use and cultivation of cannabis became legal in Massachusetts on December 15, but last week state lawmakers voted to push back the licensing of any recreational stores until July 1, 2018.

This means that while possession in Massachusetts is legal, the sale of marijuana won’t be for at least eighteen months.

img_9559Kate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Andrew Freedman spends his days neck-deep in cannabis. As the director of the Governor’s Office of Marijuana Coordination for Colorado, he knows the ins and outs of just about everything about the drug and how it relates to the state. We just sat down with him to discuss, among other things, Denver’s social-use initiative and how the state will be involved in implementation, how states that legalized marijuana in November are building on Colorado’s model, and where he thinks Colorado businesses might expand next.

Today you’ll have a chance to ask Freedman your own questions during our Facebook Live interview with him at 2 p.m. But first, our own Q&A:

herbal-outfitters-alaska-marijuana-shopHerbal Outfitters

“High noon” is what the operators of Herbal Outfitters called their grand opening at midday October 29 in Valdez, Alaska. The historic event made Herbal Outfitters the first retail marijuana store to open in Alaska since residents voted to legalize recreational use two years ago.

When you hear the name Valdez, you might picture Juan Valdez and his horse showing up uninvited first thing in the morning with a steaming cup of Colombian coffee. Or you might remember the name from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, caused by an alcohol-saturated captain sleeping one off as his third mate ran the Exxon Valdez oil tanker into a reef. But if you’ve ever been to Valdez, Alaska, you know that it’s a small port town located in south central Alaska, surrounded by snowcapped mountains, with a population of a little over 4,000 people and now the state’s first marijuana store.

mericaKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Which states will be the next to legalize recreational marijuana? Five states have ballot measures that, if passed, would allow the use of recreational pot. Here’s a rundown of the latest polling:

Arizona: Too close to call
44 percent for, 45 percent against

Arizona State University’s Morrison Institute of Public Policy and ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication teamed up with theArizona Republic to sponsor a poll on Proposition 205 that was published the first week of September. The poll indicated that 50 percent of voters favor Prop 205 and only 39.9 percent oppose it. Ten percent were undecided at the time.

mericaKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Which states will be the next to legalize recreational marijuana? Five states have ballot measures that, if passed, would allow the use of recreational pot. Here’s a rundown of the latest polling:

Arizona: Too close to call
44 percent for, 45 percent against

Arizona State University’s Morrison Institute of Public Policy and ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication teamed up with theArizona Republic to sponsor a poll on Proposition 205 that was published the first week of September. The poll indicated that 50 percent of voters favor Prop 205 and only 39.9 percent oppose it. Ten percent were undecided at the time.

proposition-d-ballot-revision-measure-marijuana-englander-ucba-angelesGustavo Turner/L.A. Weekly

In November California voters will have a chance to legalize recreational marijuana — and speculators are licking their lips at the prospect of a green rush in the Golden State. One analysis says California’s legal pot revenues could more than double — from $2.7 billion in 2015 to $6.6 billion in 2020 — if we fully legalize cannabis.

But in the biggest marijuana market in the United States (the city of Los Angeles has more dispensaries than the entire state of Colorado), the industry’s growth could lag, even if recreational weed is passed by voters.

An organization that represents the majority of legit (medical) marijuana shops in L.A. is pushing to cap the city’s number of dispensaries — medical or not — at 135. The organization, the United Cannabis Business Alliance (UCBA), has just filed its initiative language with the L.A. City Attorney’s Office …

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