Search Results: registration (129)

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Activist/attorney Rob Corry: “Serious questions are raised as to the allocation of the patients’ funds”

​Activist/attorney Rob Corry, one of the most visible marijuana advocates on the Colorado scene, has sent an open records request to the Colorado Department of Health. Corry wants to know where the money has gone.

Via email, Corry writes that Colorado has received “conservatively $1.7 million… from suffering patients paying for the privilege of waiting four months for a paper card that doesn’t fit in normal wallets and falls apart in one wash,” reports Michael Roberts at Westword.
In the letter, Corry documents 19,691 patients who received marijuana registry cards between June 2001 and September 2009. With the health department recently receiving a record 1,650 applications in a single day, that number is clearly out of date.

Arizona residents on probation or parole would no longer be able to consume cannabis to relieve their pain or other ailments under a newly proposed law.

Arizona Republican Vince Leach, R-Saddlebrookeintroduced several anti-medical-marijuana bills last year that went nowhere, including one that would have stopped the state from offering registration discounts to food-stamp recipients. This time, he’s targeting people on probation…

Dear Stoner: What is the number of plants one can cultivate with a medical marijuana card? I’ve heard you can have up to 75 if you’re a caregiver, but I’ve also heard Colorado will be setting a state maximum of twelve.
Pete

Dear Pete: Current medical marijuana caregivers can actually have up to 99 plants for a maximum of five patients, thanks to a bill passed in 2015 — but the clamps have been tightening ever since. Caregivers with extended plant counts of more than 36 plants in their homes must now register with the state, and Governor John Hickenlooper has been vocal about further cutting those counts in 2017 because of concerns about the black market.

The rumblings you’ve been hearing about a twelve-plant maximum are true: The state has been pushing to limit a patient’s plant count to twelve in private homes this year, as well as to adopt a more detailed patient registration system and ban recreational co-ops. If you don’t think twelve is enough, try to get an extended plant count while you still can; they’re not dead yet.

Grassroots Colorado was a marijuana club closed after a 4/20 weekend raid in 2015.

Update: The Denver Responsible Use Initiative, a Denver NORML-backed proposal intended to create venues for the social consumption of cannabis in the Mile High City, fell short of qualifying for the November ballot — and attorney Judd Golden, who was both the author of the initiative and one of its primary proponents, has a major takeaway from the experience.

“It highlights the need to increase voter registration in Denver,” he says. “We were just shocked by the number of people who said they were registered voters who weren’t.”


In 1999, the voters in Maine approved the state’s first medical marijuana bill with a lopsided 61% approval. A decade later, the law was improved upon to allow for storefront dispensaries and to broaden the list of acceptable medical conditions that marijuana could be recommended for. In 2011, the law was built upon once again, protecting patients’ rights by making many registration processes optional.
In November of 2013 Portland, Oregon became the first city on the east coast to legalize recreational marijuana use for adults over the age of 21. In November of this year, the city of South Portland became the second.
Statewide recreational marijuana legalization -similar to what we’ve seen in Colorado, Washington, Alaska, and D.C. – appears to be inevitable in Maine.


The story of Trucker the pit bull would be weird under any circumstances. After all, he disappeared in Arkansas in June only to turn up almost four months later in Central City, Colorado. But the tale becomes that much stranger given the circumstances of his rescue: A Good Samaritan bought him from a homeless man who’d reportedly tried to trade him for pot.

Keep your friends close. Keep your enemies closer. Keep your Friends List private.


You may remember a couple of weeks ago we reported here on a story about DEA agents in New York stealing a suspect’s online identity and creating a fake Facebook profile in her likeness in an attempt to lure her friends into guilt-ridden admissions of their own.
The suspect, Sondra Arquiett, sued the Drug Enforcement Agency and the federal government for $250,000 and was due to begin court proceedings on the matter this week, but the suit is now in mediation as the feds try to buy their way out of the embarrassing situation. The revelation that law enforcement was using the popular social media networking site to conduct undercover investigations was just another on a growing list of incidences that have left those still logging on wondering just how real, and how safe, Facebook actually is.

JackstonStormes.com
Jackson Stormes.


Jackson Stormes is one of the thousands of children in this country suffering from Dravet syndrome, a rare form of severe epilepsy that causes constant seizures and, generally, means a painful, poor quality of life for the children who have it. But for many, hope can be found in a low-THC, high-CBD cannabis extract that all but stops the seizures and allows kids to live a much more normal life. Sadly, Jackson hasn’t been able to access the high-CBD medicine where he lives in New Jersey, because that state’s program is being bogged down by inept program management and state leadership who would rather it all just go away says his mother, Jennie Stormes.
So with few other options, the Stormes family is uprooting and moving to Colorado where they know nobody, have no jobs but know that there is at least some hope for their son.

Brandon Marshall/Westword.


It was a surprisingly sparse crowd that gathered in the Broward College South campus’ Performing Arts Center on Tuesday to watch United For Care’s Ben Pollara and Drug Free Florida’s Javier Correoso debate Amendment 2 and the legalization of medical marijuana.
Yet, the passions that are being inflamed over this issue were ever present, particularly among the crowd of mostly pro-medical marijuana.


The results of this year’s State Fair poll were released Tuesday, showing that Minnesotans favor same-day voter registration and an increase in the gas tax for road and bridge construction.
But a slight majority also opposes the idea of legalizing cannabis for recreational use, thereby extending access beyond the medical program established last spring.

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