Search Results: ryan (143)

Songwriter and OneRepublic frontman Ryan Tedder has joined the throngs of musicians – from Willie Nelson to Nathaniel Rateliff – who are getting into the cannabis, CBD and hemp fields.

But instead of launching a strain named after himself, Tedder is putting out an “all-new hemp extract sparkling water” called Mad Tasty that promises to bring “wellness to the masses in the tastiest way yet.”

Denver Ordinance 300, which is on the ballot this November, would allow businesses to opt into allowing marijuana on their premises. After proponents put up a billboard pointing out that allowing restaurants to have private consumption areas would keep tokers off the sidewalk, Westword sat down with Rachel O’Bryan, the campaign manager for Protect Denver’s Atmosphere, the group opposing the initiative. An attorney by trade, O’Bryan was part of a task force that addressed possible criminal-law issues after Amendment 64 passed, allowing recreational marijuana in Colorado. O’Bryan makes it clear that her group is not opposed to recreational marijuana or legalization per se, but opposes 300 specifically as a matter of public safety.

D.W. Kee/Flickr.


A Los Angeles Police Department officer who resides in Huntington Beach has been arrested for exposing himself near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, according to cops in Surf City. Police received several calls about a man exposing himself in the wetlands at the dead end of Bolsa Chica Street, which led detectives to stake out the area, observe a fellow exposing himself on an open path and place him under arrest last Thursday morning, Oct. 23, according to Huntington Beach Police Lt. Mitch O’Brien.
The suspect was later identified as 33-year-old Ryan Eric Galiher, who works out of the Van Nuys station but was, obviously, off duty at the time he was allegedly getting his jollies.

NORML
Bryan Epis has been silenced by the federal government as a condition of his sentencing agreement

Editor’s note: Recently, a remarkable resolution was reached on a federal medical marijuana case involving Bryan Epis, a California cannabis club operator, under which Epis had to agree not to be involved in marijuana activism. Epis’s attorney, John Balazs, has contributed his thoughts about the case below in a guest post which is reprinted here with his permission.

By John Balazs
Attorney
Bryan James Epis is a well-known medical marijuana activist who is believed to be the first person to be tried in federal court for cultivating marijuana for medical purposes after the 1996 ballot initiative that legalized medical marijuana in California. Although only 458 plants were found at his residence, the government extrapolated from a disputed spreadsheet to project that his “conspiracy” to grow marijuana was for at least 1,000 plants, the threshold to trigger a mandatory minimum 10-year sentence. 

Declaration Brewing smells a certain way during happy hour, after the employees of several nearby cannabis businesses get off work. Three of them, old friends from high school, leave their pot posts early one afternoon to share stories before the crowds arrive.

It’s not always easy to split your job before 4 p.m., but since Anthony Karas, Corey Buffkin and Ryan Buffkin all own their respective weed businesses, approval from the boss isn’t required. Karas and the Buffkin brothers have each created award-winning growing operations, expanding their businesses in similar lanes without stepping on each other’s toes.

Not that they’re scared to mix it up.

Eric Jensen feels trapped. By now, the 43-year-old thought he’d be able to travel from his home in southeastern Colorado to see his son play college ball in the Midwest. But instead, he can’t cross the border into Kansas. He’s stuck hanging around his home town, where most of the residents have turned their backs on him, believing that he’s a hardened drug dealer. Instead, he’s facing criminal charges for something that’s completely legal in Colorado: hemp.

Eric and his brother, 39-year-old Ryan Jensen, grew up in the town of Holly, ten miles from the Kansas border. Early on, they started working on the family farm, the fourth generation to do so, and by 2007, they’d taken over for their father, Robert. They grew wheat and corn and onions and cabbage, which was harvested and shipped to grocery stores across the country. But their biggest crop was cantaloupe.

Are stoners lazy? Not according to a recent University of Colorado Boulder study that questions the “lazy stoner” stereotype. Overseen by Angela Bryan, a professor in CU Boulder’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, as well as the Institute for Cognitive Science, the study looked at a possible link between cannabis use and exercise behaviors.

“If we think about the typical ways you think of cannabis, it’s making you more relaxed and maybe not as motivated to get out of the house, and as an exercise researcher, that’s concerning,” says Bryan. “On the other hand, there’s some really good longitudinal data that shows that long-term cannabis users have lower weight, lower risk of diabetes, better waist-to-hip ratio, and better insulin function. It’s kind of a scientific quandary, so we thought we should do investigations to see whether there really is a problem that might be happening, or if cannabis could even be a benefit to physical activity.”

A recent report from a Colorado organization devoted to keeping children away from marijuana advocates for potency limits on cannabis products, which continue to get stronger and stronger.

“This is very different from marijuana in the 1980s,” says Rachel O’Bryan, co-founder of Smart Colorado, whose mission statement notes that the outfit “engages and informs Coloradans on the risks that marijuana poses to youth.” As a result, she maintains, “it’s a fundamentally different game.”

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