Search Results: seeds (168)

The Colorado Department of Agriculture has not only created the first hemp-seed certification program in the country, but it just certified its first three seed varieties. Passing state-regulated THC and observation trials, these industrial hemp seeds are now eligible to be grown by the Colorado Seed Growers Association for production as a “CDA Approved Certified Seed.”

“This moves hemp toward mainstream agriculture and the same practices of other crops,” says Duane Sinning, assistant director of the CDA’s division of plant industry.


Kentucky’s hemp farmers will receive 250 pounds of hemp seeds held up by federal officials at Louisville International Airport for the last week after much legal wrangling by the state.
According to Holly VonLuehrte, an attorney for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, says she’ll have the shipment at the Ag Department office sometime later today. However, the delay could mean that hemp harvests may not have time to fully develop before harvest season.

VH HAMMER/FlickrCommons


Earlier this year, on February 7th, President Barack Obama signed a new farm bill, backed by a rare display of bipartisan politicking. Originally introduced by cannabis-friendly Congressmen Jared Polis (D – CO), Earl Blumenauer (D – OR), and Thomas Massie (R – KY), the bill contained a very special amendment. For the first time in decades, the federal government had made an allowance for the cultivation of hemp. The hemp caveat only applies to states that have passed their own form of hemp legalization, and Massie’s Kentucky is one of those states.
Also from the Commonwealth of Kentucky is Republican Senator Rand Paul, who has made clear his support for hemp cultivation in the state. The senior Senator from Kentucky and possible-Sleestack Mitch McConnell was reported to be instrumental in making sure that the bill that the president signed retained the hemp growing amendment.
Kentucky was poised to re-establish its roots in a hemp trade that flourished in the state until it was banned by the federal government in 1937. Today, however, the state finds itself embroiled in a lawsuit against the federal government, and their first hemp harvest hangs in the balance.

https://www.facebook.com/nodalmolinvicenza
An Italian anti-war protester, and his ammunition


Besides being home to countless fine restaurants, museums, and theatres, Vicenza, Italy is also the location for U.S. Army Base Del Din and Camp Ederle, home to the U.S. Army Africa, the regional U.S. Army Garrison, and the 173d Airborne Brigade.
In 2004, the U.S. military announced its intention to expand the base to take over a nearby abandoned airport by the name of Dal Molin. Besides some minimal resistance during a change in leadership, the Italian government was on board with the base expansion. It was not until two years later however, in 2006, that the general public was made aware of the Americans’ plans, and a resistance was born.

Graphic: Geocurrents.info

​By Jack Rikess

Toke of the Town

Northern California Correspondent
“It’s just not worth it for me,” Argos said as he ground the pungent coffee beans.
“I put in around about a grand or so, per plant, not counting labor and love. Breaks my heart to have to let it go for anything less than $1,500 individually. Especially because I know the kids across the valley are picking up my medicine and bringing it to L.A., getting two grand and half for an elbow. Calling it whatever those Hollywood types are smoking these days.”
 
I sat at his table listening the rain hammering his mountain cabin while Argos hand-cranked the beans into one of those old-fashioned meat grinders.
“It’s getting bad and crazy at the same time,” he told me. “Folks I’ve known who’ve grown for years, through the droughts and the DEAs, are pulling up stakes and leaving.”


Photo: Reality Catcher
No, this isn’t the guy. And these aren’t the chips. But it seemed somehow appropriate.

​Police officers in Rome, Georgia arrested a man on a misdemeanor marijuana charge after finding what they claimed appeared to be pot seeds in a bag of potato chips, according to official reports.

Police and deputies went to an apartment in Rome to serve a warrant, but they could not get anyone to answer the door, reports Kim Sloan at the Rome News-Tribune.
Officers said since they heard the television on, “they went inside to make sure everyone was OK.”
Isn’t it great just knowing that from now on, whenever you leave the TV on to make it appear as if someone is at home, you’re inviting police officers to come busting in?

Many American farmers were handed seeds of opportunity in October, when the United States Department of Agriculture released its much-anticipated regulations for farming hemp. The new federal rules came nearly a year after Congress legalized hemp farming, and almost half a decade after the Colorado Department of Agriculture established its own program for farming hemp. And this state’s rules don’t exactly line up with the ones just announced by the feds.

Two years after voters approved Amendment 64, legalizing recreational marijuana, Colorado decided to opt into the 2014 Farm Bill, a federal law that allowed states to create pilot programs for hemp licensing. As a result, Colorado is now one of the largest producers of hemp in the country. While every Colorado farmer growing hemp will probably have to change a few things once the federal regulations take hold, those same regulations also bring credibility to an industry essentially stuck in a federal gray area, according to Corey Cox, an attorney with Vicente Sederberg who represents clients in Colorado’s hemp industry.

No disrespect to strains from previous decades, but there’s no comparison between the potency of early chronic and today’s sugar-dipped space nuggets. I’m not saying that’s always a good thing — nowadays strains can be too strong for a simple afternoon toke — but we’d be fools not to recognize the evolution of cannabis. That’s like saying LeBron James wouldn’t dominate the NBA in the ’90s. Save those stale takes for the Moose Lodge.

During our recent conversation with hash-maker extraordinaire Kennn Wall, he talked about the need for stronger, sturdier strains for worthwhile cannabis extraction. According to Wall, only 5 to 10 percent of strains on the market today have the quality and quantity of trichomes to make those stiff, terpy rosins and live concentrates that connoisseurs love. Some of his favorite strains that do? Papaya cuts, specifically from Oni Seed Co. So what did I buy during my next trip to the dispensary? Papaya Cake, a mix of Papaya and Wedding Cake, bred from Oni Seeds.

1 2 3 17