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Colorado’s cannabis industry has been holding its collective breath ever since President Donald Trump nominated Jeff Sessions for attorney general. And since he was sworn in, Sessions, a proponent of the war on drugs, hasn’t been shy about saying that marijuana should remain illegal federally.

In a proactive move, on April 3 the governors of four states with recreational cannabis businesses up and running at the time — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — sent a letter to Sessions and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, urging that federal officials “engage with us before embarking on any changes to regulatory and enforcement systems.”

With all due respect to Stranahan’s and Leopold Bros., Colorado isn’t really known for its hard liquor. Craft beer, mountains and marijuana rule this land. Even our moonshine is a product of basements and warehouses, not backyard distilleries. In the Rockies, nothing says you’re not in Appalachia like a joint of Moonshine Haze.

Moonshine Haze blew up in 2011, winning best sativa in the High Times Cannabis Cup and bringing Colorado breeder Rare Dankness to national prominence. After acquiring an Afghani-heavy cut of Amnesia Haze, Rare Dankness crossed it with sativa Nevil’s Wreck for a confident, cloudy high. This Moonshine is stiffer than most, easily reaching THC levels of 22 to 27 percent. It doesn’t have the herbal spice most Hazes are known for, instead pushing out sour, intense aromas and tastes of berries and pine with hints of bubblegum.

The new occupants of an old church at 400 South Logan Street have been raising eyebrows since Google Maps starting listing the address as the “International Church of Cannabis.

The occupants’ response? “Yup, that’s us.”

Steve Berke and Lee Molloy, founders of the International Church of Cannabis, had been living, working and practicing their religion of Elevationism at the building for months, but it wasn’t until the International Church of Cannabis showed up on Google that its neighbors in West Washington Park started taking notice.

“First and foremost, this is a community church,” Berke says. “There are rumors that this is a rasta smoking lounge or a nightclub. It’s not. It’s a safe place to congregate and consume.”

The world hasn’t come to an end. U.S. Representative Ed Perlmutter was told it would when Colorado voters legalized recreational marijuana use in November 2012 and he started introducing legislation in Congress that would aid the industry as businesses began to struggle with banking problems, among other issues.

Now, as President Donald Trump takes the oath of office, Perlmutter says he’s not finished fighting for marijuana legalization at the federal level. Perlmutter’s Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act was struck down last summer. Had it passed, it would have banned federal regulators from penalizing financial institutions for providing banking services to legal marijuana businesses; Perlmutter is planning to try again this session.

The who’s who of Colorado’s marijuana industry gathered Saturday night for the unveiling of Willie’s Reserve, Willie Nelson’s cannabis company.

To launch his new product, Nelson hosted two kick-off concerts, one last week in Washington state and another on Saturday, July 30, at Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre in Greenwood Village, Colorado.

“This event’s been a collection of the people that support the ideals of Willie Nelson. It’s a collection of people that understand that music and cannabis and culture and society all blend together really well,” says pioneering ganjapreneur Kayvan Khalatbari, who’s been working with Willie’s Reserve.

Marijuana fared a lot better than Democrats did at the polls yesterday. Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C. passed recreational marijuana measures closely modeled on Colorado’s, and while a medical marijuana amendment failed in Florida, it still managed to collect 58 percent support. (Under Florida law, 60 percent was required for approval). But even as marijuana reformers across the country celebrate, could Colorado be facing a pot crackdown? That’s a very real possibility.


Think marijuana use, cultivation and possession of limited amounts of pot should be legal for adults 21 and up? Think you should be able to purchase some pot at a local, neighborhood store possibly right in the shadow of the nation’s capitol? You’re not alone.
The D.C. marijuana initiative has received the support of the local chapters of the NAACP and the National Organization for Women.

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