Search Results: tsa (103)

Westword

Dear Stoner: I’m about to get on a flight, and I hear that TSA has changed its rules about allowing you to carry on marijuana. What’s up with that?
Flying High

Dear Flying High: You heard wrong, sadly. In an April 5 article on MassRoots, Tom Angell reported this: “It’s official: The federal government doesn’t care if you bring medical marijuana on airplanes.” Angell had noticed that the “What can I bring?” page on TSA’s website had changed the red “No” next to checked and carry-on baggage for medical marijuana to a green “Yes.” He quickly took a screen shot of the page and wrote an article, and just as quickly, TSA’s Twitter replied with this: “@cannaadvisors: We’re sorry for any confusion. A mistake was made in the database of our new ‘What can I bring?’ tool.” TSA’s web page also changed the “Yes” back to “No” under medical marijuana. Tom Angell’s credit, he updated the article as TSA corrected itself. But confusion remains.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I just had knee surgery and will be on my butt for a while. What’s the best weed for a long staycation?
Jill

Dear Jill: Unless you have a creative outlet that requires periods of mental energy, I’d recommend staying away from stronger sativas, because smoking Diesel or Durban might make you restless while you’re stuck on the couch with little to do. However, a bowl of something lighter, like Stardawg or Flo, could help you enjoy a book in the back yard before it’s too cold outside. If you’re planning on a steady diet of Netflix, video games and iPhone dillydallying, though, you probably want something that will take you to space.

tsa-weed-bust-phoenix.jpg

A passenger on a flight out of Phoenix’s Sky Harbor airport tried to check luggage containing 92 pounds of marijuana, according to the TSA. A TSA spokesman says the Phoenix Police Department was contacted once agents made the discovery.
According to court documents obtained by New Times, 39-year-old Lauretta Blanton had actually spread the load among three checked bags, and two of the bags actually made it onto the plane.

TSA Waste
Created by: OnlineCriminalJusticeDegree.com


It’s a safe bet that most travelers personally despise the airport body scanners used by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (and their health risks, possibly including cancer), not to mention the groping that passengers must endure if they turn down the body scan.

Meanwhile, in Europe, with more public awareness, body scanners have been banned due to health and safety concerns. A lawsuit claiming “cancer clusters” in TSA employees has been filed, which could unearth even more damning evidence against the devices.

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Mike Schaef
Mike Schaef put his medicinal cannabis in the scanner bowl at SeaTac, and after a short delay, he was given back his medicine and allowed to go on his way.

​It’s usually not a good idea to whip out your medical marijuana while going through a Transportation Security Administration airport checkpoint, but sometimes, in some airports, in some medical marijuana states, it turns out OK.

Case in point: Mike Schaef of Tacoma, Washington, who operates North End Club 420, a medical marijuana patient collective garden. 
When going through security at SeaTac airport just south of Seattle Friday morning at about 10:15, Mike put about two grams of cannabis in the scanner bowl in the TSA line.
the_coffee_joint_ice_cream_collins20180705_017Jacqueline Collins

The Coffee Joint, the first establishment to hold a cannabis consumption license in Denver, is now the second pot lounge business to apply for a state social consumption license.

Colorado Springs social lounge Studio A64 successfully applied for a social consumption license at the state Marijuana Enforcement Division office three hours before Coffee Joint owners Rita Tsalyuk and Kirill Merkulov could beat them to it.

Studio A64 could not be reached for comment, but Tsalyuk and Merkulov say the opportunity to apply for a state license is a big step for all cannabis businesses. “This is bigger than us. It’s just a bigger step in the industry,” Tsalyuk explains. “It opens the door to do something different and plan ahead for the next year.”

Thinkstock file photo

As our Ask a Stoner columnist noted this week, flying with marijuana is still not okay despite a TSA glitch that briefly suggested otherwise. But a new survey suggests that it’s happening a lot anyway. The report from MissTravel.com, which calls itself “the world’s first travel dating website,” shows that more than half the respondents have taken cannabis with them on a domestic flight. But that number tumbles for people traveling internationally.

Flying with marijuana has long been a hot topic among Westword readers. But the subject flared up nationally earlier this month, when the Marijuana Majority’s Tom Angell, a frequent interviewee in this space, tweeted the following: “Trump TSA marks marijuana as less restrictive on planes than alcohol over 140 proof, bottled water, corkscrews & recreational oxygen.”

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