Search Results: university (614)

Legal marijuana’s place in college education is still limited, but it’s starting to pay off for some University of Denver graduates.

The university’s Sturm College of Law and its media and journalism programs have offered classes centered on legal weed since 2015, with the Daniels School of Business following suit in 2017. And now, alumni are beginning to make their marks on the nation’s burgeoning industry.

Cannabis continues to gain influence, not only in new business ventures, but in college education, too. Just take a peak inside professor Paul Seaborn’s Business of Marijuana course, where students at the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver took part in a potrepreneur pitch competition June 4.

Five teams of undergraduate and graduate DU students proposed new business ideas to a panel of cannabis industry judges comprised of Julie Berliner, founder and CEO of edible company Sweet Grass Kitchen, Mark Grindeland, CEO and co-founder of Coda Signature edibles and Carter Davidson, an executive at Vangst recruiting and staffing.

Botanical art, botanical illustration and flower painting are not the same thing. The emphasis on scientific accuracy and aesthetic value varies among the three, but they all showcase a plant’s composition and beauty. And now, in a show that very well might be the first of its kind, the University of Colorado Boulder is giving cannabis the beauty treatment.

“We have a rich, rich history of botanical illustration in the state of Colorado,” explains Susan Fisher, botany artist and curator of Cannabis: A Visual Perspective. “But there were huge conversations around this subject, because it was, you know, cannabis.”

Most users consider marijuana addiction a myth, but Colorado State University’s psychology department takes it seriously…so much so that it’s focusing on marijuana in  its new master’s program on addiction counseling.

“Historically speaking, people thought you couldn’t get addicted to marijuana. We know that’s not true in the scientific community, but that hasn’t penetrated public opinion yet,” says Bradley Conner, associate professor and director of addiction counseling at CSU.

According to Conner, a shortage of certified addiction specialists and a rise in drug addiction have created a gap in accessible treatment. With his team’s undergraduate and master’s programs at CSU, he hopes to fill that void while teaching students counseling methods tailored for marijuana abusers. That’s something that hasn’t been covered enough since Colorado’s legalized marijuana industry started in 2014, Conner adds.

The medicinal uses of marijuana span a wide variety of diseases and disorders, but a recent study conducted by Colorado State University indicates that cannabis may not be as useful for treating depression and anxiety.

In December 8, researchers in the Department of Psychology at Colorado State University published a study regarding the relationship between marijuana use and depression and anxiety in study participants. Led by professor Lucy Troup, a cognitive neuroscientist at CSU, the study focused on the residual effects of marijuana over time on three groups of students — casual users, chronic users and non-users — and observed how individuals assessed their levels of depression and anxiety.

Phoenix New Times 2014.


Dr. Sue Sisley was about to conduct some of the most important cannabis research in the United States when she was abruptly fired from her job at the University of Arizona this past June for what she says (and what clearly appears to be) purely political reasons.
Our cohorts at the Phoenix New Times have done an amazing job looking into what happened and, more importantly, what is in store for Sisley’s study that looks at how military veterans can use cannabis to help treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.


Dennis Carter, a standout wide receiver for MSU-Mankato, faces an attempted murder charge for allegedly shooting a longtime acquaintance in the head over a marijuana debt.
The incident occurred shortly before midnight on August 20 along a dirt road near the Renaissance Festival campgrounds in Scott County. The victim, later identified as 28-year-old Diaa Ahmed Abdelhakim, says Carter shot him execution-style and only failed to kill him because his gun jammed. Carter, on the other hand, told investigators he accidentally shot Abdelhakim after wrestling his gun away from him during a struggle.


Established in 1910, the University of Mississippi boasts an enrollment of well over 16,000 students. The Rebels from “Ole Miss”, as it is commonly referred to, have not brought back a national championship since their football team did it back in 1962.
What the campus is more famous for, in counter-culture circles anyway, is the fact that the government has been growing weed there for “research purposes” for decades.
But with more and more private and foreign labs returning study after study outlining the vast medicinal benefits to the cannabis plant, the feds are looking to crank up their own production in hopes of giving their own researchers a chance at being relevant in the discussion of cannabis use.


As we’ve reported, the University of Arizona fired the lead researcher of a study that looked at the therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating people with post-traumatic stress disorder. While no reasons were given, Dr. Sue Sisley says that she was fired for political reasons and not because of her performance.
And now she has filed an official appeal with the university, demanding that continue as assistant professor and assistant director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program. She has support, too. As we wrote earlier this week, an Iraq veteran posted an online petition at Change.org that has gathered more than 31,300 online signatures.

Dr. Sue Sisley.

Back in June, the University of Arizona without warning fired Dr. Sue Sisley, the lead researcher in a program that would have studied the use of medical cannabis for post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms – though many suspect it was for Sisley’s marijuana advocacy.
The move struck a blow to people hoping for clinical proof of the efficacy of cannabis that could increase access to medical cannabis in Arizona and beyond, including Iraq veteran Ricardo Pereyda who created a petition that has more than 29,000 signatures so far (and could use one from you, too). See the petition and links to sign it below.

1 2 3 62