Search Results: vaporizer (68)


The rapid rise in the popularity of 3D printers in recent years, paired with how affordable they have become, has led to a long list of crazy, deadly, useful, and sometimes downright delicious creations being spit out by these incredible machines. Anything from firearms, to body parts, to pizzas, and in a move straight out of a Terminator movie, we even have 3D printers printing out more 3D printers.
So, of course, it took no time flat for folks to start pumping out 3D-printed plastic accessories for the cannabis crowd – everything from cheap grinders to entire bongs shaped like popular video game characters.
But a research and development firm out of Israel has taken the technology to a whole new level with a 3D-printed vaporizer that they believe will change the way the world looks at medical marijuana.


While we think the Emmy’s are generally just a reach-around for Hollywood elite and don’t really represent the best acting, directing or writing on television, the awards ceremony occasionally provide some entertainment.
Like last night, when comedian Sara Silverman showed off her hash-oil filled vaporizer pen to a national audience while completely blowing off mindless questions about fashion and proved that at least one person in Hollywood thinks the awards are as big of a joke as us.

Back in January, as part of a post about a marijuana tour hosted by O.penVAPE, a Denver-based firm whose vape pens and other products have been acclaimed by cannasseurs across the planet, we published the photo above, in which company chief revenue officer Todd Mitchem can be seen enjoying some herb just after recreational use became legal.
The image doesn’t suggest that Mitchem would be in favor of drug-testing his employees — but in April, the firm announced that it would be doing exactly that. The result was a month of controversy, with a well-known pot advocate jousting with Mitchem on social media over the approach. Now, however, O.penVAPE has amended its policy and the critic is praising Mitchem for doing the right thing.

Vaporizers FTW

In an innovation sure to please patients who can’t afford to, well, cough up almost $700 for a Volcano vaporizer, one San Francisco medical marijuana delivery service is now offering the top-shelf vaporizers for rental.

Volcanoes, like other vaporizers, gently heat the herbal material without burning it, so you get pure flavor and aroma without smoke. Vaporization creates a fine mist, similar to steam, with the result being what many say is better flavor, increased purity, and greater effect.
Many patients who find cannabis smoke to be irritating report effective relief through inhaling vapor.
But with the latest digital model of the Volcano retailing for $669, many patients couldn’t afford to experience the healthy luxury of German vaporizer engineering (the Volcano is manufactured by the German firm of Storz & Bickel).

Recreational marijuana users are starting to look past smoking joints and bongs, and moving on to more advanced methods of consumption, according to an annual report from the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division.

The MED’s yearly checkup of the state’s pot industry, just released this week for 2018, shows that sales of edibles, pre-filled vaporizers, dabbing concentrates and other infused products are increasing at a much faster rate than the sale of cannabis flower and trim.

The hoopla surrounding CBD has become so loud that even CBD companies are starting to get annoyed. One Colorado CBD brand recently went so far as to buy ads in New York’s Time Square to attack gimmicky products and marketing campaigns that push CBD into everything from candles to firewood.

CBDistillery, a company known for hemp-derived CBD edibles, oils, capsules, vaporizers and more, wants people to be more discerning about how they consume CBD. But where is that line drawn, and who should be leading the conversation? We chatted with CBDistillery chief marketing officer Chris Van Dusen to see what he thinks.

Hash-oil vaporizers show both the potential and the challenges of the cannabis industry. Their convenience and discretion are undeniable, but so are the inconsistencies in dosage and potency. GoFire, a vaporizer startup in Denver, has slowly been working on a solution to those problems, however, and is almost ready to unveil it.

The company’s self-dosing vaporizer employs a microchip on hash-oil cartridges to read cannabis testing results, which consumers can use and then log in a journal on their phones. To learn how GoFire plans to use this new technology to change medical and recreational cannabis, we talked with CEO Peter Calfee.

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