Search Results: wilkinson (7)

Graphic: Witchgrass

​There is so much damage and devastation inflicted on American communities by our government’s senseless war on cannabis that the sheer magnitude of the tragedy can sometimes overwhelm us. Bust statistics and prison terms blur into a cacophony of numbers, a calculus of pain as they inexorably pile and snowball.

But one thing that can really take us right back to the reality of the situation — that the war on marijuana destroys lives — is to take a look at a close-knit community and the individuals in it, and how they are impacted when the heavy hand of pot prohibition enters the picture.
That’s exactly what author Dave Wilkinson does with his novel Witchgrass: A Pipe Dream, originally released in 1994 and reprinted this year. The book portrays shattered lives and conflicted families as a New England town splits apart.
Trouble comes to rural Maine as a middle school student is recruited in a DARE class to inform on her parents for marijuana (talk about a storyline ripped from the headlines). As we see the toll the Drug War takes on a small New England town, we are left to ask why.

Nebraska cops lining their pockets doing a roadside check.


Nebraska cops still pissed about Colorado legalizing marijuana are pushing for increased monetary penalties for cannabis possession as well as increased funding to pay for the overtime they are all milking. Police Chief B.J. Wilkinson of Sidney, Nebraska (population 7,000) says he’s written more marijuana tickets in five months than he did in all of last year. “Five out of every ten” stops results in a marijuana arrests, he says. They’ve already run through their yearly allotment of overtime pay to pay for cops to go to court for the marijuana cases. It’s “deteriorating a quality of life here” in his town, he says.
We bet. Your cops are too busy shooting fish in barrels to deal with any actual crime in their town.

SCIENCE VS. STIGMA-TRAILER from Dave Wilkinson on Vimeo.


The new documentary film Science vs. Stigma does a wonderful thing: It puts a human face on some of the collateral damage from the War On Drugs. The film does this by allowing medical marijuana patients to share their struggles to safely access an unjustly demonized medicinal herb that helps them.

True stories and scientific research reveal the difficult lives of patients who require the ancient medicinal plant, cannabis, which is now legal in some states, but still so demonized that it cannot even be named in an advertisement.
The medicinal components of cannabis have been shown to be effective in treating dozens of conditions, but patients who are ill and disabled are still senseless persecuted and socially stigmatized.

World Economic Forum
President Felipe Calderon scolded “political forces” that don’t have the “vision” to support his Drug War

​President Felipe Calderon of Mexico admitted on Sunday that despite five years of all-out war against the drug cartels in his country, the organizations continue to pose “an open threat” to democracy in Mexico. He must have lost the part of his speech that would have detailed how his own Drug War has done exactly the same thing.

In a frankly worded speech marking the start of his sixth and last year in office, Calderon said interference in elections by drug gangs “is a new fact, a worrisome fact,” reports Tracy Wilkinson at the Los Angeles Times. “It is a threat to everyone,” Calderon said.
President Calderon was probably thinking about last month’s local elections in Michoacan, his home state, where drug traffickers intimidated voters and told people how to vote.

Photo: Cafe Press

​Cannabinated canines, anyone? A Seattle company is developing a medical marijuana patch for pets, calling it a “question of quality of life.”

Jim Alekson’s Medical Marijuana Delivery Systems LLC has patented the patch, called Tetracan, and says it could be used on dogs, cats, and even horses, reports Eric Wilkinson at KING 5 News.
Of course, to buy the patches you’d need to be a medical marijuana patient yourself, since Rover can’t get an authorization from the veterinarian — at least, not yet.
The company intends to press for changes in state law that would allow vets to prescribe medical cannabis for pets, something that currently isn’t allowed, reports Jonathan Walczak at Seattle Weekly.
“It is our intention, once the patch delivery system is perfected, to approach states for approval to use the patch for veterinary use,” Alekson said.

Photo: KING 5
Kent Police raid Suzie Q’s, one of the four medical marijuana dispensaries in town, on Wednesday. All four dispensaries in Kent were raided and shut down.

​The repercussions of Washington Governor Christine Gregoire’s failure of leadership — when she vetoed most of a bill that would have legalized medical marijuana dispensaries in the state — continue to reverberate. Police in Kent, Washington served search warrants at all four  dispensaries in town on Wednesday afternoon.

The businesses, all located in the Kent valley, have been the subjects of an “ongoing investigation” for selling medical marijuana to authorized patients, supposedly “in violation of state law,” a city spokesman said, reports KIRO TV.

Photo: FOX6Now

​It’s the feel-good story of the day. About 750 marijuana plants were stolen from a Farmington, Maine law enforcement storage building overnight last week. The storage facility is only half a mile from the police station.

Farmington police officers discovered the break-in Wednesday at 9:30 a.m., according to Police Chief Jack Peck, reports David Robinson of the Central Maine Morning Sentinel.
An overhead garage door had been “pried open” and about three-quarters of the 1,000 marijuana plants seized earlier on Tuesday in a northern Franklin County drug raid and stored in facility that night, were gone gone gone, according to Peck.