Search Results: wilson (61)

Photo: Double Dribble
Wilson Chandler of the New York Knicks wishes the NYPD didn’t waste so much time busting people for pot.

‚ÄčNew York Knicks forward Wilson Chandler was busted on a marijuana possession charge after police pulled his vehicle over Tuesday night in Queens, police said.

Chandler, who turned 23 last week, was carrying what was described as a “small amount” of marijuana when cops pulled over the 2010 Mercedes-Benz in which was was riding at 11:30 p.m., according to police, reports Larry Celona at the New York Post.
The fuzz said decided to search Chandler after they claimed to smell pot coming from the vehicle.
Chandler was issued a desk appearance ticket for the misdemeanor offense, meaning he must appear in county court for arraignment at a later date.
Chandler, who missed the final month of the season because of a strained groin, was drafted by the Knicks in 2007. He is scheduled to undergo a sports hernia surgery and will need six to eight weeks to recover.

Sklyer Reid/Voice Media.

The call to release testimony heard by the Staten Island grand jury that cleared Daniel Pantaleo got a big boost last week, when Public Advocate Letitia James and two legal advocacy groups applied to have a wide range of materials from the proceedings disclosed.
The court in Staten Island has so far released only the most basic information about the grand jury that examined Eric Garner’s death.

No sooner had the NYPD received praise for respecting peaceful protests than the force doubled back and reminded everyone that while officers might have let people on a couple bridges this week, they’re still very adept with a bottle of pepper spray.
More than 200 protesters were arrested through the night of December 4, the highest number since protests began. On Wednesday, December 3, a total of 83 people were arrested. On November 24, during the first anti-police-brutality protests after Ferguson, Missouri, Police Officer Darren Wilson was not charged for shooting Michael Brown to death, only two people were arrested — one for pouring fake blood all over NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton and his security detail and the other for throwing an aluminum can at an officer. Village Voice has more.

Dallasboy/WikiCommons.

Until the very end, last Tuesday night’s demonstration in Dallas against the grand jury’s decision in the Ferguson case was uneventful. Marchers congregated at Dallas Police Department headquarters in the Cedars then walked through downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson for killing unarmed teenager Mike Brown.
“Tonight I’m somewhat numb, but I’m also saddened,” Michael Bowie Jr., new senior pastor of St. Luke Community United Methodist Church in Dallas told The Dallas Morning News at the protest. “First it was Trayvon [Martin], now it’s Michael Brown. And it’s sad that killing of black males is justified and legal.”

Another night of violence, looting and property damage plagued Ferguson last night with the grand jury’s announcement that Darren Wilson would not be charged with the killing of Michael Brown. Although the initial reaction on South Florissant Road in front of the Ferguson Police Department seemed peaceful at first, the violence many were expecting ultimately prevailed.
Here is the arrest data provided this morning by the St. Louis County Police Department: 61 total arrests last night in Ferguson. There were seven for unlawful assembly, one for assault, one for arson, 29 for burglary second, six for misdemeanor possession of stolen property, ten for misdemeanor receiving stolen property, one for felony receiving stolen property, seven for trespassing, one for unlawful possession of a firearm, one for marijuana possession. Yes, the cops actually arrested someone for marijuana possession in the middle of all of this. Riverfront Times has more.

St. Louis County prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch dismissed five pending felony court cases Wednesday because they depend on testimony from Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.Wilson is a key witness in the five cases — including one marijuana case — which cannot continue without his testimony.
Wilson, who fatally shot unarmed teen Michael Brown on August 9 and set off weeks of protests and backlash against police, has been in hiding since the shooting. Wilson, who is on paid administrative leave, emerged briefly to testify in Clayton to the grand jury investigating Brown’s death, but he was not seen in public. Riverfront Times has more.

Danny Wicentowski.


The investigation into the death of Michael Brown has sprung a leak. Three leaks, in fact. First, the New York Times published details from the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot Brown, Darren Wilson. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch then got its hands on the official autopsy. And finally the Washington Post announced that several black witnesses have given testimony that matches Wilson’s version of events.
After months of keeping a tight lid on the grand jury and civil rights investigations into Brown’s death, the leaks feel like a little more than coincidence, especially as the city braces for the potential violence if Wilson is not indicted with a charge in Brown’s death.

YouTube
Failed reality TV show “Texas Takedown” lands cops in court


Apparently full to the brim with shows about everything from hoarders to housewives, reality TV producers in the state of Texas have found a new format to film – the home invasion.
The proposed show is called “Texas Takedown” and it follows a crew-cut band of Lone Star state lawmen as they kick down the doors of unsuspecting Texans from Austin to the Alamo, hoping that whatever waits on the other side is at least good for ratings.
On September 22nd of 2011, just after 10 o’clock pm, fame came crashing through the front door of the home belonging to then 59-year old Perla Carr.

JackstonStormes.com
Jackson Stormes.


Jackson Stormes is one of the thousands of children in this country suffering from Dravet syndrome, a rare form of severe epilepsy that causes constant seizures and, generally, means a painful, poor quality of life for the children who have it. But for many, hope can be found in a low-THC, high-CBD cannabis extract that all but stops the seizures and allows kids to live a much more normal life. Sadly, Jackson hasn’t been able to access the high-CBD medicine where he lives in New Jersey, because that state’s program is being bogged down by inept program management and state leadership who would rather it all just go away says his mother, Jennie Stormes.
So with few other options, the Stormes family is uprooting and moving to Colorado where they know nobody, have no jobs but know that there is at least some hope for their son.

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