Search Results: death/ (5)

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In a highly unusual move, the Denver coroner’s says that marijuana intoxication was the major contributing factor in Levy Thamba’s death by jumping from a hotel balcony last month because the college student had eaten a marijuana edible before the incident.
The coroner’s office says the facts of the case explain why the decision to include information about marijuana was made, though the facts leave a lot of unanswered questions.

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These synthetic smokables do not resemble marijuana.

Stephane Colbert says her 19-year-old son died in 2011, allegedly after he smoked a synthetic, lab-made c compound called “Mr. Smiley” that many news outlets are calling “synthetic marijuana”..
Synthetic weed was banned federally in May of 2011 but Nicholas Colbert still was able to purchase some of the stuff in September of that year from a neighborhood Kwik Stop in the Springs.

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Photo: CNN
Jose Guerena was shot up to 60 times by five police officers. There was nothing illegal in the house.

​A United States Marine who died in a flurry of bullets in a botched drug raid near Tucson, Arizona, never fired on the SWAT team that stormed his house, according to a new report from the Pima County Sheriff’s Department.

The revelation added to national outrage over the death of Jose Guerena, who died May 5 after a SWAT team descended on his home with a search warrant, reports Chuck Conder at CNN. Guerena’s home was 0one of four that police claimed were “associated with a drug smuggling operation” in the area.

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Photo: Stephen Keable/Book of Odds

​A group of sociologists and geneticists trying to unravel the roots of human behavior heard from colleagues Saturday about research which indicates teenage boys who have two copies of a particular gene variant engage in fewer “risky behaviors” — including marijuana use — than their peers who carry at least one copy of another version of the same gene.

Interestingly, the “no-risk” gene appears to be greatly influenced by laws. Genetic protection against risky behaviors appeared only at ages when such acts were illegal, such as prior to age 21 for drinking alcohol, according to researcher Dr. Guang Guo of the University of North Carolina.