Browsing: Media

sklar brothersTroy Conrad

Unless you’re a knowledgable comedy fan or watched a lot of Cheap Seatson ESPN Classic during the early 2000s, you may not recognize the Sklar brothers by name. But their faces and voices are a different story. The hilarious twins have made audiences around the country laugh with their unique, harmonious act while appearing in shows like Entourage, Better Call Saul and Curb Your Enthusiasm. Now, they’re showing off their stuff in an audio documentary.

In their new special on Audible, Sklars and Stripes, Randy and Jason Sklar visit ten different cities on tour with the help of HQ Trivia’s Scott Rogowsky, recording standup bits and traveling experiences along the way. The six-hour special includes more than forty minutes in Denver and Boulder, where the Sklars visited local landmarks like Casa Bonita, Comedy Works and Ballpark Holistic Dispensary.

marijuana fake newsWestword file photo

Last August, when veteran reporter Peter Marcus announced that he was leaving the ambitious ColoradoPolitics.com project he’d helped launch the previous year in favor of a communications-director position with the rapidly growing marijuana dispensary chain Terrapin Care Station, he stressed that he wasn’t leaving journalism behind, and that he planned to start a website that would mix original stories with posts intended to counter misinformation being spewed by pot enemies.

That site, TheNewsStation.com, is now live, and included among offerings that Marcus says “promote the positive business and economic impact of the cannabis industry” is a section in which he tears apart what he sees as marijuana “fake news.”

iStock/monkeybusinessimages

After years of sitting on the sidelines, Colorado’s state lawmakers and local regulators are finally starting to address the issue of social cannabis consumption. Denver’s first licensed cannabis consumption lounge opened its doors earlier this month, while a bill in the Colorado General Assembly that would allow dispensary tasting rooms passed its first committee hearing March 19.

But what if it’s all for naught? According to a new study that surveyed more than 600 current cannabis users regarding their spending and consumption habits, most would prefer consuming in private. 

YouTube

America’s history of being wrong-headed about cannabis is well-documented on a variety of platforms, but the funniest way to examine it today is on YouTube. Host to a wide range of entertaining lunacy, YouTube’s rabbit holes can lead down some weird paths, including flat-earth theories, ’80s hair metal or videos that end in some asshole yelling “WORLD STAR!”

One of my favorite dens of nostalgic stupidity is anti-marijuana commercials and public service announcements from yesteryear. While a few carry messages that make some sense, such as the dangers of youth use or smoking and driving, many of them carry the same Reefer Madness rhetoric we make fun of today. Don’t believe it? Check out these ten commercials and PSAs from past decades and see for yourself.

women in cannabisiStock/cyano66

When Windy Borman started making her documentary on women in the cannabis industry in 2015, women held 36 percent of its senior leadership roles, compared to 22 percent across all industries in the United States. But by the time her film, Mary Janes: The Women of Weed premiered at the Alamo Drafthouse in Littleton March 3 to a sold-out crowd, the latest news showed that that statistic had dipped nine points, to 27 percent.

The new number “gives the film’s call to action a new meaning,” Borman said in a panel discussion after the viewing. “Geena Davis says, ‘If you can see it, you can be it.’”

Jacqueline Collins

Windy Borman grew up during the height of the DARE era in the ’80s and ‘90s. She never smoked cannabis, which she knew as a gateway drug, because addiction ran in her family.

women of weedJacqueline Collins

But Borman, 37, moved to Colorado for a job in 2014, the same year recreational pot was legalized. She had produced and directed films on topics such as elephants that stepped on landmines and learning disabilities, but she found a new subject in her new home: women in the cannabis industry.

After completing a fall film festival circuit, Bormann will travel to four more festivals this spring. She’s also doing a grassroots tour in seven cities across the country, including Denver, to stir up conversations around cannabis in local communities. In an interview with Westword, Borman talks about “puffragettes,” today’s social challenges surrounding cannabis and the first reactions to her film.

YouTube file photo

The Colorado Springs Gazette, owned by conservative billionaire Phil Anschutz, has earned a reputation as the most overtly anti-marijuana major newspaper in the state. And while the first entry in a new series presented beneath the banner “Is Colorado better off five years after legalizing marijuana?” is an improvement over an anti-pot screed from nearly three years ago that was partially penned by a prominent and devoted cannabis hater, it still focuses almost entirely on bad news.

Courtesy of Cannabrand

At this writing, thirty states and the District of Columbia have legalized some form of marijuana, be it recreational, medical or both, with Colorado having been in the latter category for more than four years. Nonetheless, Facebook and Instagram continue to make it difficult for cannabis businesses to advertise and promote themselves on the platforms. The scenario causes frustration within the industry even as it forces marketers to come up with clever ways to get around restrictions.

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