Browsing: Hemp

socialimpactKicco Koffie

Kicco Koffie officially launched at the end of 2019, but the new CBD coffee company already wants to add something to its brand: global entrepreneurship.

“Our goal was to create a product that could service a need,” says Kicco co-founder Vincent Sarlos. “And that service would be a healthy coffee that tasted really good and can teach entrepreneurship all over the world.”

cbddog (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

About six months ago, a Reddit user posted a photo of a sign pretending to peddle fake CBD-infused firewood. The Internet reacted as you’d expect, shaking a collective fist and rabble-rousing over something that was clearly intended as funny commentary concerning exactly what the Reddit readers thought they were mad about: CBD is being used and abused.

Even if the Internet’s anger was misplaced (big surprise) and we haven’t reached the point of CBD-infused firewood yet — that we know of — there’s no dearth of dumb cash grabs by companies slapping some CBD on it. Earlier this year, we spotted a hot dog stand (at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, of all places) advertising franks infused with 5 milligrams of the stuff. Carl’s Jr. did something similar as a 4/20 stunt in Denver, adding a whopping 4.2 milligrams into a special sauce for a special burger.

opener_hempJay Vollmar

Eric Jensen feels trapped. By now, the 43-year-old thought he’d be able to travel from his home in southeastern Colorado to see his son play college ball in the Midwest. But instead, he can’t cross the border into Kansas. He’s stuck hanging around his home town, where most of the residents have turned their backs on him, believing that he’s a hardened drug dealer. Instead, he’s facing criminal charges for something that’s completely legal in Colorado: hemp.

Eric and his brother, 39-year-old Ryan Jensen, grew up in the town of Holly, ten miles from the Kansas border. Early on, they started working on the family farm, the fourth generation to do so, and by 2007, they’d taken over for their father, Robert. They grew wheat and corn and onions and cabbage, which was harvested and shipped to grocery stores across the country. But their biggest crop was cantaloupe.

stoner (8)Westword

As America’s knowledge about the plant grows, the range of subjects our Stoner handles have expanded. While most of the questions we received in previous years asked such things as how to roll a joint or if it’s possible to boof marijuana (it is, but be careful), 2019 queries ventured into slightly more intellectual subjects, such as the recent vaping health crisis, or what the point of useless “indica” and “sativa” designations really is.

As we enter a new year full of unknown and new mysteries, here are five of our most interesting and popular Ask a Stoner questions in 2019.

den_011217_veritas_grow_slentz006 (1)Scott Lentz

Remember 2012? Peyton Manning had started his first season with the Broncos, and none of us knew jack about CBD. Seven years later, most of us still know jack about CBD, but at least we recognize how ignorant we are about that and other cannabis compounds.

The letters CBC, CBG and CBN probably look like acronyms for Canadian broadcasting entities to anyone outside of scientists and pot nerds, but they’re actually lesser-known molecular fruits of the cannabis plant. And with hemp’s recent legalization, we’re hearing a lot more about these “new” cannabinoids and their medical and wellness potential. We recently caught up with scientist and former hemp grower Devin Alvarez, CEO of CBD company Straight Hemp, to learn more about this alphabet soup of cannabis.

nfl_kickoff_8sept_2016_36_of_78_Brandon Marshall

Songwriter and OneRepublic frontman Ryan Tedder has joined the throngs of musicians – from Willie Nelson to Nathaniel Rateliff – who are getting into the cannabis, CBD and hemp fields.

But instead of launching a strain named after himself, Tedder is putting out an “all-new hemp extract sparkling water” called Mad Tasty that promises to bring “wellness to the masses in the tastiest way yet.”

veritas_farm_collins20190807_011Jacqueline Collins

Many American farmers were handed seeds of opportunity in October, when the United States Department of Agriculture released its much-anticipated regulations for farming hemp. The new federal rules came nearly a year after Congress legalized hemp farming, and almost half a decade after the Colorado Department of Agriculture established its own program for farming hemp. And this state’s rules don’t exactly line up with the ones just announced by the feds.

Two years after voters approved Amendment 64, legalizing recreational marijuana, Colorado decided to opt into the 2014 Farm Bill, a federal law that allowed states to create pilot programs for hemp licensing. As a result, Colorado is now one of the largest producers of hemp in the country. While every Colorado farmer growing hemp will probably have to change a few things once the federal regulations take hold, those same regulations also bring credibility to an industry essentially stuck in a federal gray area, according to Corey Cox, an attorney with Vicente Sederberg who represents clients in Colorado’s hemp industry.

cbd-sign-aurora-petrovic-2019Nina Petrovic

Driving around the residential streets of Colorado, you might see signs that look like they’re about to announce a garage sale but instead are advertising hemp or CBD oil. Like the homemade one pictured here, on Iliff Avenue in Aurora, hawking 1,444 milligrams of CBD oil for $60.

“There’s a lot of concern, or growing concern, as we see a lot of the CBD market grow and grow,” says Hollis Glenn, director of the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s inspection and consumer services. “You see CBD being sold in places like gas stations, and the industry is so new that there’s no directive on how it should be manufactured.”

tissueculture_shelf_frb8372web_croppedCourtesy of Front Range Biosciences

A Colorado research laboratory is teaming up with a space-tech firm and University of Colorado Boulder research institute to send hemp and coffee into outer space, in order to learn more about the power plants.

Front Range Biosciences, an agriculture technology company that researches hemp and other cultivation aspects, just announced a plan that will transport hemp and coffee tissue cultures to the International Space Station, where they will be cultivated and studied for potential genetic mutations that the plant cells undergo at different stages of gravity, which could have commercial and medical applications.

cbdJacqueline Collins

According to a recent survey published by the Grocery Manufacturers Association, over 75 percent of Americans assume that commercial CBD products are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration — which is not true.

Out of the 2,056 Americans who participated in the survey, 76 percent of respondents assumed that CBD products were already regulated by the FDA, while 16 percent of respondents were unsure of whether CBD products were regulated by the FDA or not — adding up to a 92 percent rate of confusion over CBD production and regulation.

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