Browsing: Technology

coffee-joint-canna-coding-chester-2019Britt Chester

The Coffee Joint’s most recent CannaCoding session featured industry professionals from Cannopy, Vangst and Flowhub.

The first rule of cannabis coding: well, there are no rules…yet. Legal cannabis is still very much the digital Wild West for coders.

The Coffee Joint, Denver’s only licensed pot lounge, has been hosting a series of sessions called CannaCoding, bringing industry professionals and prospective cannabis coders together to talk about the developing trade. 

smoking.driving.file.photo.800Thinkstock file photo

A retired Oregon police officer believes he’s found a way to detect marijuana impairment among drivers, and it starts by looking deep into their eyes.

The struggles behind effectively identifying stoned drivers have only grown for law enforcement as marijuana legalization spreads across the country. Detecting pot impairment isn’t as simple as using a breathalyzer, blood test or urine sample, as THC can affect everyone differently at varied paces. But law enforcement consultant Chuck Hayes (not the 6’5″ power forward who couldn’t shoot free throws) believes eye movement can help police officers get a better grip on stoned drivers.

cannabis-business-awards-clover-leafCannabis Business Awards

Held annually since 2010 by Clover Leaf University, the Cannabis Business Awards celebrate some of the industry’s brightest companies and advocates. Although legalization continues expanding to new states every year, the national CBAs are still held in downtown Denver every December, with the latest edition taking place at the Hilton Denver City Center on Wednesday, December 5.

As they did at the 2017 CBAs, Colorado cannabis influencers owned the national competition this year, with nineteen individuals or organizations taking home twenty awards. Notable local winners include Governor-elect Jared Polis (Political Industry Representative of the Year), Wanda James (Most Influential) and activists Jason Cranford and Alexis Bortell (a teenager) for joining in former Denver Bronco Marvin Washington’s lawsuit against the Department of Justice over federal cannabis prohibition.

gofire-inhaler-01Courtesy of GoFire

Hash-oil vaporizers show both the potential and the challenges of the cannabis industry. Their convenience and discretion are undeniable, but so are the inconsistencies in dosage and potency. GoFire, a vaporizer startup in Denver, has slowly been working on a solution to those problems, however, and is almost ready to unveil it.

The company’s self-dosing vaporizer employs a microchip on hash-oil cartridges to read cannabis testing results, which consumers can use and then log in a journal on their phones. To learn how GoFire plans to use this new technology to change medical and recreational cannabis, we talked with CEO Peter Calfee.

terpenes-marijuana-smell-istock-2018 (1)iStock/yarygin

Possible windfalls from legalizing hemp and CBD may get all the headlines, but terpenes could have just as much commercial potential. Terpenes are responsible for the smells and flavors that help us distinguish different strains of pot; like elevator songs and character actors, you recognize them without knowing what they are.

Terpenes are found in many plants, which is why cannabis can taste like citrus fruit, lavender and so on. They’ve shown potential for aiding in pain relief and other medical ailments, and you can consume them much like cannabinoids, via vaping or ingestion. But the public still doesn’t know much about identifying terpenes, and scientists are nowhere near understanding their full potential. To learn more about them, we chatted with Dr.Tristan Watkins, chief science officer for Lucid Mood, a cannabis vaping company that manipulates terpenes for desired effects.

the_green_solution_marijuana-grow-collins2017Jacqueline Collins

Legal cannabis is growing fast. Since November 2012, when voters in Colorado and Washington approved legalizing the plant, seven more states followed suit, and two more have legalization measures on the ballot next month. And don’t forget Canada, where marijuana became officially legal in mid-October.

All that growth brings a growing demand for energy and other resources, however. Cannabis business analytics firm New Frontier Data recently released a report showing that electricity consumption by America’s pot industry will increase by 162 percent by 2020, with the industry currently consuming 1.1 million megawatt hours of electricity annually, or enough to power 92,500 homes for a year.

the_green_solution_collins20171215_003 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s cannabis industry is still changing at a rapid pace. The industry’s watchdog, the state Marijuana Enforcement Division, updates its rules and regulations every year in hopes of catching up with the expanding field, which is growing like a weed in more ways than one.

The MED’s annual meetings aren’t unique to cannabis; plenty of regulatory agencies update their rules each year. But governing a federally illegal industry that is continually developing new methods for ingestion, packaging and product extraction takes a lot of work. That’s why the MED held six stakeholder meetings over the summer and into the fall, with public health and regulatory officials, industry members, law enforcement representatives and other individuals that make up Colorado’s legal cannabis picture.

1_-_parma-italy-cheese-tourCourtesy of Matthew Kind

Matthew Kind can’t do many interviews past noon. Next month, he might have to shut off even earlier, depending on which time zone he’s in. Such restrictions are usually avoided by talk-show hosts, who stick closely to standard production deadlines in order to consistently churn out content. Yet Kind’s ever-evolving itinerary is exactly why he chose this line of work.

The host of the CannaInsider Podcast and his family of four have lived in nearly a dozen countries throughout Europe and North America since 2016, thanks largely to a substance that would get him arrested at most international borders: His weekly podcast, which he hosts remotely with the help of his wife, Bethany, focuses on business and industry trends in cannabis.

stoned.driving.anthony.cameraAnthony Camera

Recent Colorado Department of Transportation figures show that stoned-driving fatalities went down from 2016 to 2017 for those over the legal intoxication limit but up in fatal crashes involving drivers who tested positive for any marijuana in their system, whether above the line or under it. Such mixed results are typical according to a new report, which acknowledges that getting firm answers about the risks involved with driving high remains an enormous challenge.

And there are plenty of reasons why.

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