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seed-smith-grow-collins-2019 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s fluctuating marijuana prices may have found some stability, according to the latest data from the state Department of Revenue. The DOR’s official estimate for the average price per pound of marijuana flower in Colorado has risen slightly for the fourth straight time, up to $850 as of July 1.

Brendan McCormick, sales director for wholesale marijuana provider Bonsai Cultivation, believes wholesale marijuana prices are actually higher than the DOR’s estimates now that outdoor grows are done harvesting, reaching anywhere from $1,000 to $1,300 per pound.

natures_gift_shop_collins20170812_016 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s billion-dollar marijuana industry is about to welcome some deeper pockets into the game, but first it needs to create rules to play by.

With just over five months to go until a new law expands marijuana business investment opportunities to publicly traded companies, venture capitalists and private equity firms, the Marijuana Enforcement Division has called upon dozens of marijuana industry regulators, attorneys, business owners and other stakeholders to help figure out how these new investors and owners will be able to operate in this state.

_erb_art_and_drink_collins20190127_019Jacqueline Collins

Marijuana consumers are a little too high on themselves behind the wheel, according to government and road safety organizations — but the affects of the plant on drivers aren’t as clear as those of alcohol.

Recent studies from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Colorado Department of Transportation and American Automobile Association highlight growing concerns among law enforcement, chiefly that a large portion of marijuana consumers think they’re better at driving after using pot, and the majority of Americans don’t think stoned drivers will be caught by police.

lighting-blunt-420-fest-collinsJacqueline Collins

The United States House of Representatives has pushed for more marijuana reform in 2019 than in any prior year, and just approved a bipartisan measure that protects all state pot programs from federal interference.

On June 20, House members voted in favor of prohibiting the Department of Justice from using funds to prevent any American state, territory and Washington, D.C., from approving and implementing laws authorizing marijuana use, distribution, possession and cultivation; they did so through an amendment to the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill.

06152019ragerocks012Michael Emery Hecker

Anyone who’s been to a Lettuce show has likely seen people in the crowd enjoying weed (among other things), but the band serenading pot plants in person takes cannabis cultivation to a whole new level.

Days after Lettuce’s show at Red Rocks Amphitheatre on June 15, members of the funk band showed up at one of Terrapin Care Station’s cultivations with their instruments and gave the plants and employees a live show. They played some tracks from their new album, Elevate, and didn’t shortchange those in attendance, bringing along enough instruments and equipment for a legitimate set.

tetra_lounge_glitter_bong_collins2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

The conversations around social equity in the Colorado cannabis industry may have started late, but a new category of business licenses could help expand diversity in this state’s pot industry.

When Governor Jared Polis signed Senate Bill 224 last month, he approved a long list of updated cannabis-industry regulations. Among SB 224’s many changes to the commercial pot industry was its creation of accelerator business licenses, reserved for people from low-income areas of Colorado who want to start their own cannabis business but don’t have industry connections or access to funding. Known as micro licenses around the industry, they would allow startup businesses to use the facilities of established pot companies as they research and create their own cannabis products, which they would completely own.

04202018_bruce_polis_420_0040 (1)Kenzie Bruce

With a few strokes of his pen, Governor Jared Polis ushered in the most change to Colorado’s marijuana landscape in a single day since voters approved recreational pot in 2012.

Inside a sweaty, packed governor’s office at the Capitol on Wednesday, May 29, Polis approved bills that legalized social marijuana consumption, commercial delivery and opened the state’s pot industry up to public investors, as well as measures that significantly overhauled and expanded both the medical and recreational marijuana sectors.

jenny-gold-and-julie-christine-facebook-Courtesy of Jenny Gold

High heels can get uncomfortable, but Jenny Gold misses the pain of walking around in them all day. The soreness was minuscule compared to her current agony, likely brought on by a tick while Gold was visiting Mexico over twenty years ago with college friends.

“You have to have a positive attitude with Lyme disease, because the people that don’t will not make it very long. There’s a lot of suicides because of the pain,” she explains. “Some people with heart problems don’t make it. So many different things can happen to your body with it.”

img_3863Jacqueline Collins

Coloradans voted for major change in November 2012, when they approved Amendment 64 and legalized recreational cannabis. Now Colorado lawmakers have approved changes that will prove almost as momentous.

Measures opening the state to social pot use and commercial cannabis delivery, as well as approving new medical conditions for medical marijuana, all passed the Colorado General Assembly this session. But even more changes could come through less sexy bills that address sunsetting laws in the state’s medical marijuana program and pot industry. These bills would create new business licenses, along with new opportunities for medical marijuana access; regulations would be eased for cannabis business owners and employees alike.

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