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jenny-gold-and-julie-christine-facebook-Courtesy of Jenny Gold

High heels can get uncomfortable, but Jenny Gold misses the pain of walking around in them all day. The soreness was minuscule compared to her current agony, likely brought on by a tick while Gold was visiting Mexico over twenty years ago with college friends.

“You have to have a positive attitude with Lyme disease, because the people that don’t will not make it very long. There’s a lot of suicides because of the pain,” she explains. “Some people with heart problems don’t make it. So many different things can happen to your body with it.”

img_3863Jacqueline Collins

Coloradans voted for major change in November 2012, when they approved Amendment 64 and legalized recreational cannabis. Now Colorado lawmakers have approved changes that will prove almost as momentous.

Measures opening the state to social pot use and commercial cannabis delivery, as well as approving new medical conditions for medical marijuana, all passed the Colorado General Assembly this session. But even more changes could come through less sexy bills that address sunsetting laws in the state’s medical marijuana program and pot industry. These bills would create new business licenses, along with new opportunities for medical marijuana access; regulations would be eased for cannabis business owners and employees alike.

international-church-of-cannabis-foundersWestword

The fight between the International Church of Cannabis and the City of Denver may finally be over, but which side really won? Over two months after one of the church’s co-founders, Steve Berke, was found guilty of public pot consumption violations for his role in a 2017 4/20 party, another church co-founder was found not guilty of the same charges.

Lee Molloy — who, along with co-founders Berke and Briley Hale, was charged with allowing public pot consumption and violating the Colorado Clean Indoor Air Act during the church’s inaugural 4/20 party in 2017 — was found not guilty by Denver County Judge Johnny Barajas on Friday, April 19.

carl_s_jr._rocky_mountain_high_cbd_cheeseburger_delightCourtesy of Carl's Jr.

You don’t need to smoke a joint or play hooky to celebrate 4/20 anymore. Just hit up a certain Carl’s Jr. in Denver that is testing CBD-infused burgers all day on Saturday, April 20.

Available only on 4/20 at the Carl’s Jr. located at 4050 Colorado Boulevard, the Rocky Mountain High CheeseBurger Delight will come topped with a mayonnaise-based Santa Fe Sauce infused with 5 milligrams of CBD. The CBD oil, derived from hemp, is provided by Colorado company BlueBird Botanicals.

joe-neguse-cory-gardner-neguseCourtesy of the office of Congressman Joe Neguse

Senators Cory Gardner and Elizabeth Warren just reintroduced their States Act today, April 4, in hopes of guaranteeing states the right to choose their own marijuana policy. The two may seem an odd pairing, but Democrat Warren represents Massachusetts, where recreational cannabis is now legal, and Republican Gardner has pushed the feds before to observe Colorado’s laws regarding marijuana.

Representatives Earl Blumenauer and David Joyce have introduced the bill concurrently in the House, and the measure is expected to be heard by a House committee within weeks, according to House Rules Committee chairman Jim McGovern, who’s bullish on its chances.

tetra_lounge_glitter_blunt_collins2018Jacqueline Collins

A bill that would allow social cannabis consumption in Colorado dispensaries, hotels, cafes and other businesses passed its first test on Wednesday, March 27, when it moved out of a House committee on a 7-4 vote.

Recreational cannabis use has been legal in Colorado since late 2012, but it’s only allowed in private dwellings and establishments, with “open and public” pot consumption banned by the state constitution, despite Amendment 64 being billed as a measure to “treat marijuana like alcohol.” Past legislative efforts to create a licensing system for social consumption businesses have failed, but sponsors of House Bill 1230 are confident of their chances this year.

dadanddudeDads & Dudes Breweria

For the past three years, Mason Hembree has been working on a difficult balancing act. He’s a craft beer brewer who feels more at home in the cannabis industry, a Libertarian iconoclast who is nevertheless trying to work within the system, and the owner of a tiny company who wants to play ball with the big boys.

Now, Hembree, who co-founded Dad & Dudes Breweria in Aurora in 2010, may have finally found the perfect nexus of those things. In late February, Hembree and his father, Thomas, sold their brewery to San Diego-based Cannabiniers, a company with big plans for growth.

incredibles_marijuana-bud-plant-collins2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s marijuana industry could open its doors much wider to corporations and underrepresented demographics in ownership if two legislative measures pass this year.

A bill that would allow publicly traded companies to own Colorado marijuana business licenses and lessen investment restrictions passed its first committee hearing in the state legislature Monday, March 4, while State Representative Leslie Herod is expected to push another bill later this year addressing social equity in the pot industry.

hemp-farm-drozBen Droz

When House Bill 1286 passed last year, advocates thought it would mark the beginning of a new era for children who use medical marijuana. So far, though, they’re still waiting.

The bill expanded on a 2016 law that allowed child patients to take their MMJ medication at school. That law required that the medication be administered by a child’s MMJ caregiver, usually the parents. The newer measure — known as Quintin’s amendment, in honor of nine-year-old epilepsy patient Quintin Lovato in Eagle County — allows school personnel to also administer medication, to help patients faster and ease the burden on parents. The proposal passed through the state legislature by relatively wide margins.

However, of the 178 school districts in Colorado, we found just one district that has implemented the policy so far, and it allows school personnel to administer only CBD medication. That district is Eagle County Schools, the district Lovato attends.

incredibles_marijuana-bud-plant-collins2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Denver no longer has the distinction of being the only major city with retail marijuana dispensaries, but that hasn’t stopped weed from flying off the shelves here. This city has seen almost $2.4 billion in marijuana sales since the first retail dispensary opened on January 1, 2014, according to our calculations based on Colorado Department of Revenue data.

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