Browsing: Follow that story

vaping weedJacqueline Collins

We’ve called hash vaporizers the brown paper bags of toking in the past, but a new study shows that hash pens aren’t fooling anyone: People just don’t care. According to a survey of over 1,000 adults, vaporizing cannabis in public isn’t that big of a deal to most.

Sober living website Detox.net asked over 1,000 adults ranging in age from eighteen to 78 for their opinions about vaping weed in public, and their responses should make you feel better next time you’re plugging away at that hash pen while waiting for an Uber.

nuvolution-foundersCourtesy of Anne Marie Doyle

Many young cannabis entrepreneurs and companies are nurtured by Colorado’s pot-industry incubators, but nonprofits that focus on the plant haven’t received anywhere near the same attention.

Filing for federal tax-exempt status for a cannabis-related nonprofit tends to scare a lot of people away, so nonprofits haven’t seen the same windfall as cannabis entities in other sectors. The regulatory worries don’t end there, either, thanks to laws banning cannabis samples and consumption at public events and other strict regulations unique to legal pot. Even in Denver, pot nonprofits struggle to find a safe space in which to operate and grow.

home growFlickr/Mark Eggrole

Government reports recently revealed that over 665,000 pounds of legal marijuana were sold in Colorado last year, but that number hardly accounted for every sale in the state. Although market research shows that Colorado’s marijuana black market has become significantly smaller than the rest of the country’s since retail dispensaries showed up in 2014, it hasn’t evaporated altogether.

Various law enforcement agencies collaborated on a network of raids on illegal marijuana grows in at least five towns and two counties on August 9, as first reported by the Denver Post — and the marijuana seized from the raids could be small potatoes compared to what’s happening on public land in Colorado.

loopr_pizza_and_pot_tour_collins20180722_021 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Not counting the budding behemoth in California, it’s tough to match Colorado’s pot-smoking prowess, which was put on full display in the state’s recent Marijuana Enforcement Division’s 2017 market-demand study.

According to the MED, Colorado’s legal marijuana market demanded 665,134 pounds of pot in 2017, accounting for over $150 billion in total revenue. That’s a 31 percent rise from 2016, the study shows, and a 130 percent rise since 2015, when the MED began tracking the data.

sovinemillerAnthony Camera

When Cindy Sovine submitted her application for a social cannabis consumption license to Denver in February, she was confident that her pot-infused spa would be approved. The health-care-turned-cannabis lobbyist had influential friends in the city and had even helped lobby for Initiative 300, the voter-approved measure that created Denver’s social-use licensing program in November 2016.

Her plans for Utopia All Natural Wellness Spa and Lounge in Capitol Hill called for educational seminars, cannabis-infused massages and medical treatments, support groups and a new ventilation system to make sure that neighborhood nostrils wouldn’t notice. Her business plan submitted to the city included letters of approval from five neighborhood organizations, four more than what Denver requires.

They weren’t enough.

joey.hopper.dara.wheatley.facebookFacebook

As of last July, the Colorado Attorney General’s Office Hoppz Cropz prosecution was likely the largest marijuana conspiracy case in the state: thirteen defendants charged with a combined 244 crimes, including racketeering under the Colorado Organized Crime Control Act, for illegally peddling nearly 200 pounds of cannabis.

Nearly a year later, a hefty 175 of those allegations have been dismissed and ten of the original thirteen people accused, including Dara Wheatley, the significant other of presumed ringleader Joseph “Joey Hops” Hopper, have pleaded guilty to comparatively minor crimes that haven’t resulted in any jail time whatsoever. A document detailing these twists and turns is accessible below.

weed-jar-mountains-collinsJacqueline Collins

Although Colorado’s legal cannabis industry has maintained a steady of pace of increasing revenues over the years, a new market report from one of pot’s leading economic-research teams says it could be time to prepare for a plateau.

In BDS Analytics and Arcview’s sixth annual State of Legal Marijuana Markets report, the two cannabis firms dive into each state with medical or recreational cannabis programs. Arcview, known for its investment and market research, notes that it’s never had so many states to cover in its report — and all that new competition will likely draw tourist buyers into new regions as they come online, including Nevada, California, Massachusetts, Canada and possibly Maine.

adam.lee.kids.facebook.croppedFacebook

In May, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a damning preliminary report about the late-2017 death of forty-year-old Loveland Ski Area employee Adam Lee, who suffered crushing chest injuries while working on the Magic Carpet, a motorized beltway used to teach kids how to ski.

The document essentially characterizes Adam as an innocent victim. But his widow, Erika Lee, says Pinnacol, the company that administers workers’ compensation payments in Colorado, is trying to withhold half of the money she should be receiving to support her three kids because Adam’s autopsy revealed high levels of THC in his blood.

1 2 3 31