Browsing: Cannabis Time Capsule

mcgettigan_photo (1)Courtesy of Tim McGettigan

Colorado State University-Pueblo professor Tim McGettigan recently published The Politics of Marijuana, a book about the past, present and future of cannabis in the political and social sphere. Specifically, he focused on the anti-cannabis crusade of the 1930s and how it influenced the way cannabis is still taboo for many today, despite more nationwide support for the plant than ever before.

We caught up with McGettigan to learn more about his book and where he thinks cannabis legalization will take the country in the future.

WeedBrownieMix-thumb-400×300.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

Did you know that pot brownies became popular by mistake? Or that one of the world’s earliest edible recipes was used by a band of assassins? The history of cooking with cannabis starts over a thousand years ago, comes to a screeching halt in the twentieth century, then moves at light speed after 2012.

Already riding high off the success of her first foray into cannabis literature, The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, author and journalist Robyn Griggs Lawrence — a self-described “digital nomad” who lived in Boulder for many years — now dives into humanity’s long relationship with eating cannabis in Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis. In this new book, Lawrence describes the ancient eating habits of Chinese and Persian cultures while teaching us about our own country’s past with the plant. We caught up with Lawrence to learn more about the history of eating cannabis and some of her favorite infused snacks.

03072019hickenlooper_rally021Michael Emery Hecker

Using cannabis legalization as a platform to popularity is all the rage for this latest round of Democratic presidential candidates. Nearly every candidate in the blue party has endorsed some form of cannabis-policy reform, ranging from full-scale legalization at the federal level to letting states decide on their own.

Former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper, who announced his run for the White House on March 4, arguably has more experience with the issue than any other candidate in this primary race: He presided over the state’s implementation of recreational cannabis from the vote for Amendment 64 in November 2012 through early 2019, when he was term-limited out of the governor’s slot. Under Hickenlooper, Colorado has earned more tax revenue from legal pot than any other state so far and boasts one of the most advanced medical marijuana programs in the nation.

marijuana fake newsWestword file photo

Last August, when veteran reporter Peter Marcus announced that he was leaving the ambitious ColoradoPolitics.com project he’d helped launch the previous year in favor of a communications-director position with the rapidly growing marijuana dispensary chain Terrapin Care Station, he stressed that he wasn’t leaving journalism behind, and that he planned to start a website that would mix original stories with posts intended to counter misinformation being spewed by pot enemies.

That site, TheNewsStation.com, is now live, and included among offerings that Marcus says “promote the positive business and economic impact of the cannabis industry” is a section in which he tears apart what he sees as marijuana “fake news.”

Westword

Shortly after Amendment 64 passed on November 6, 2012, the flood of questions began. How much pot can I buy from a dispensary at one time? How many plants can I grow in my house? Why do I want to eat half my body weight in fried chicken after I smoke? To answer all of these inquiries effectively, Westword created a new position: the Stoner.

Though he doesn’t look like the sharpest tool in the shed, our Stoner has been here for all of your cannabis questions since it was legalized recreationally. Questions have ranged far and wide in the five years since voters spoke up (and toked up); keep reading for links to the the ten most interesting, relevant and ridiculous we’ve received:

Brandon Marshall

On July 1, Nevada became the fourth state with open recreational marijuana dispensaries, following in the footsteps of Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska. As newly liberated cannabis consumers flock to dispensaries for some of Nevada’s first legal herb, media reports are already showing the state is experiencing growing pains that Colorado’s cannabis industry can relate to.

KenGorman.org

This year marks a decade since the still-unsolved murder of Denver 420 Rally founder and groundbreaking Colorado marijuana activist Ken Gorman. But he hasn’t been forgotten. Indeed, current rally organizers meeting to talk about appealing the City of Denver’s three-year ban of the event brought along Gorman’s ashes, treating them like the equivalent of holy relics. And the mere mention of Gorman triggered both deep emotion over his loss and anger that his killer or killers have yet to be held responsible for their actions.

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At the time of this tiny news brief from the May 16, 1903 Glenwood Post, “hasheesh” was being blamed for all of the crime and “insanity” in Egypt. Efforts to stamp it out resulted in sixteen tons of hash being confiscated in the country for the year 1901.
The population of Egypt at the time was somewhere around 8 million people, according to historical sources. The population of Colorado, currently, is around 5.1 million people — and they use a lot, lot more…

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We reported earlier this week that all hopes for medical marijuana in Minnesota this year were gone. We’re happy to report we were wrong.
A bill legalizing the use, cultivation and sales of medical cannabis introduced last year by State Senator Scott Dibble, a Democrat from Minneapolis, will be considered by a state Senate committee later today.

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