Browsing: Say what?

d7fa0109-09ec-4e27-8aad-a1bd45e23a01Herbert Fuego

Humans have been eating cannabis for well over a millennium, but society’s love for edibles has seriously ramped up over the last decade, as legal pot becomes more mainstream. Today, you can snack on much more than weed brownies in Colorado, with dispensaries offering candy bars, coffee and plenty of other food and drink options.

But the grandaddy of all cannabis edibles doesn’t get the same love. Majoun, the Persian creation containing dates, nuts, spices and hash, has been enjoyed in the Eastern hemisphere for centuries, and gained international notoriety in the ’50s, when Alice B. Toklas accidentally published the recipe in her legendary cookbook. Good luck finding it at local dispensaries, though: I’ve yet to walk into a pot shop with majoun on the menu.

So we decided to make our own.

WeedBrownieMix-thumb-400×300.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

Did you know that pot brownies became popular by mistake? Or that one of the world’s earliest edible recipes was used by a band of assassins? The history of cooking with cannabis starts over a thousand years ago, comes to a screeching halt in the twentieth century, then moves at light speed after 2012.

Already riding high off the success of her first foray into cannabis literature, The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, author and journalist Robyn Griggs Lawrence — a self-described “digital nomad” who lived in Boulder for many years — now dives into humanity’s long relationship with eating cannabis in Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis. In this new book, Lawrence describes the ancient eating habits of Chinese and Persian cultures while teaching us about our own country’s past with the plant. We caught up with Lawrence to learn more about the history of eating cannabis and some of her favorite infused snacks.

noco_hemp_expo_collins2018Jacqueline Collins

Happy National CBD Day, everyone. No, we’re not joking: National CBD Day is now a sort of official day on the calendar, according to the not very official National Day Calendar. But where did this day come from?

As with most “national days,” National CBD Day is rooted in commercial interests, indicating just how powerful the CBD industry, expected to hit upwards of $15 billion by 2025, has become in a short time.

incredibles_collins-marijuana-kola-bud-2018Jacqueline Collins

Recreational marijuana users are starting to look past smoking joints and bongs, and moving on to more advanced methods of consumption, according to an annual report from the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division.

The MED’s yearly checkup of the state’s pot industry, just released this week for 2018, shows that sales of edibles, pre-filled vaporizers, dabbing concentrates and other infused products are increasing at a much faster rate than the sale of cannabis flower and trim.

bongathon_collins20190805_003Jacqueline Collins

Every year in Colorado, pot smokers put their lungs to the test at the Bong-A-Thon, a secretive competition that declares the fastest bong hitters west of the Mississippi. Taking place throughout the weekend of August 2 at an undisclosed location in Gilpin County, the Bong-A-Thon let a Westword photographer capture the wrestling, wet T-shirts and weed-smoking races that have been drawing stoners to the mountains for over forty years

natures_gift_shop_collins20170812_022 (1)Jacqueline Collins

The only thing better than South Park making fun of the weed industry would be South Park entering the weed industry — with some integrity. We’re still trying to find out if that’s the case, but some online nuggets have us wondering…

Through Tegridy Farms, the name of a fictional cannabis brand that popped up in an episode of the show last year, South Park Studios posted a video on YouTube July 19 that makes fun of the suit-and-tie culture trying to profit from legal cannabis. The clip appears to take aim at MedMen, an American cannabis corporation that released a short video directed by Spike Jonze about cannabis prohibition and current legalization efforts.

vaping weedJacqueline Collins

Ever hear the saying “Rappers want to be ball players, and ball players want to be rappers”? In the business of getting us fucked up, cannabis and alcohol companies appear to go through similar yearnings.

Dispensary shelves already feature beers, hard seltzers and wines infused with pot instead of alcohol, while liquor stores hope that CBD-containing, rebranded non-alcoholic beers will appeal to increasing numbers of canna-curious customers.

Now a cannabis concentrate company wants to zig where drink makers have been zagging, releasing a hash pen cartridge that is supposed to taste like an India Pale Ale — or as my Midwestern uncle likes to call them, “pine cone beers.”

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