Browsing: Dispensaries

sour grapes Herbert Fuego

I can’t be the only person who waited until June to start exercising again, but it certainly feels that way, watching all of you fit Colorado dickweeds jogging and biking everywhere as I Uber half a mile to Shake Shack. Metabolism just doesn’t have my back like it used to, and at this point in life, I deserve the love handles. Time to get off my ass and do some push-ups, right?

If only I had that sentiment before finding Sour Grapes.

bear_danceHerbert Fuego

Colorado’s cannabis and craft-beer industries are often compared, but while they might boast similar demographics, the two businesses are very different in several important ways. For instance, unlike Colorado liquor stores, which often are state-centric in their craft-beer selections, Colorado dispensaries sometimes seem to favor California genetics over strains that got their start locally. So it’s always nice to see a hometown strain, such as Bear Dance, get some commercial love in Denver.

A cross of Snowcap and Suge Pure Kush by Colorado breeder 303 Seeds, Bear Dance is usually considered a daytime strain or even a near-hybrid by dispensaries, but it’s almost always a sedative high for me. The strain’s fruity, cheesy notes are made for an after-dinner smoke, and the effects are sufficiently calming and euphoric to relax a tired, full body.

cultivars_photo_by_lindsey_bartlett_15_Lindsey Bartlett

Well, that didn’t take long: Less than a week after Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed a bill that expanded marijuana business investment opportunities for publicly traded companies, venture capitalists and private equity firms, one of the state’s largest pot corporations announced plans to scoop up two commercial marijuana operations, including the largest legal outdoor cultivation in North America.

On June 5, Medicine Man Technologies announced that it had reached binding agreements with Los Sueños Farms, an outdoor marijuana farm on 36 acres outside Pueblo, as well as Mesa Organics Ltd, which owns a commercial cultivation, dispensary and extraction facility in Pueblo.

lilac_dieselHerbert Fuego

Just about every time I get cocky enough to assume I can guess a strain’s effects based on its name, I always get brought back down to earth — or shot out to space, depending on the strain. But a Diesel had never done me wrong…until I got seduced by a bouquet of lilacs.

Aromatically alluring and extremely dangerous, Lilac Diesel is a sedative cross of several strains, including Citral Glue, Forbidden Fruit, New York City Diesel, Cherry Pie and Super Lemon Haze. The combination results in an intoxicating odor that somehow showcases a slice of each parent strain. Sweet, tropical notes of berries and fruit as well as sour, rubbery hints of gas are blanketed by calming yet zesty floral notes of lavender — or lilac, if you really want to go there.

04202018_bruce_polis_420_0040 (1)Kenzie Bruce

With a few strokes of his pen, Governor Jared Polis ushered in the most change to Colorado’s marijuana landscape in a single day since voters approved recreational pot in 2012.

Inside a sweaty, packed governor’s office at the Capitol on Wednesday, May 29, Polis approved bills that legalized social marijuana consumption, commercial delivery and opened the state’s pot industry up to public investors, as well as measures that significantly overhauled and expanded both the medical and recreational marijuana sectors.

20180918_leiffa-lab-arcpress-22 (1)Courtesy of Leiffa/Hillary Rowe

After medical marijuana was legalized in California over two decades ago, the technology behind cannabis consumption started taking off, and it’s truly exploded since 2014, when Colorado became the first state to legalize the plant for recreational purposes. The innovations took the industry from older, water-based extractions, like bubble hash, to advanced methods using solvents such as butane and CO2 to create wax and shatter.

But hash makers didn’t stop there. They soon figured out that freezing cannabis flower immediately after harvest preserves terpenes and plant oils before extraction, leading to the rise in “live” concentrates, like live resin. The newer, stankier product became the preferred dab for connoisseurs, further pushing back solventless and water-based extraction. But the progression of cannabis concentrates continues at a quick pace as newer extraction methods using rounds of ice-water extraction, heat and pressure produce concentrates that easily stack up with their solvent counterparts.

Cannabis extraction companies like Leiffa produce rosin and ice-water hash that looks, smells, tastes and lifts us to the moon like more traditional concentrates — and with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that no butane or ethanol stuck around. Although Leiffa’s Lakewood dispensary is only for medical marijuana patients, the brand’s wholesale concentrates are a growing and popular presence in recreational stores around Colorado.

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