Browsing: CBD

hempsgiving_collins20181106_018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with a traditional Thanksgiving — eating leftovers the week after is a holiday by itself — but some people like to put their own spin on the feast.

I’ve had friends who serve mac and cheese, tamales or dumplings as their Thanksgiving side dishes, all of which are more than welcome in ma’ belly anytime. But in 2018, we can take that a step further, incorporating hemp and CBD into drinks, side dishes, the main course and dessert.

hemperor.glass.bottleNew Belgium Brewing

Craft brewers are known for their collaborative spirit. But that’s within the walls of the beer world. When it comes to other vices — like wine, spirits and cannabis — some industry leaders have been a bit standoffish.

Boston Beer Company, the biggest “craft brewery” in the country, for instance, warned in early 2016 that marijuana legalization could hurt breweries if people spent their dollars there, and the Brewers Association has been so uncomfortable around the subject that the industry trade group has barely mentioned it in past years — though it did offer some analysis of that competition in early 2017.

woman-marijuana-grower-marijuana-grow-istockiStock/cyano66

The Drug Enforcement Administration appeared to take a large step forward on Thursday, September 27, when it confirmed that it would reclassify Epidiolex as a Schedule V substance. The move follows Food and Drug Administration approval and classifies the marijuana-derived cannabidiol (CBD) medication under the DEA’s lowest restriction for drugs, so physicians and pharmacies can now prescribe and dispense it in all fifty states under federal law.

Despite the headlining news, the reaction in Colorado was a mixed bag, ranging from ho-hum to angry disappointment.

maruchy_lachance_bbb_2_Courtesy of Maruchy Lachance

The vast possibilities of hemp are emerging as the legal barriers to hemp-based products begin to disappear, and among those possibilities is manufacturing products not for consumers, but for other companies. While many businesses involved with hemp and CBD are eager for the spotlight, others would rather do their work without the attention, in exchange for a manufacturing fee.

To learn more about the cannabis industry’s white-label products — something produced by one company for another to rebrand and sell — we talked with Maruchy Lachance, co-owner of CBD white-label company Boulder Botanical & Bioscience Laboratory.

humulus_lifestyle_24_of_43_CMW Media

Cannabidiol enthusiasm is reaching a fever pitch in Colorado. Consumers snarf CBD down in doughnuts, slurp it up with CBD-infused lattes, lather it on with lotions, gulp it down in capsules and, of course, puff it the old-fashioned way with high-CBD pot strains. But while the CBD craze consumes Colorado, CBD remains illegal in many American markets, since it is still labeled by the DEA’s Schedule I as having “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”

But there is a loophole: for CBD that is not derived from cannabis. And the Peak Health Foundation took advantage of that loophole to create Real Scientific Humulus Oil (RHSO-K), a CBD oil derived from the kriya brand humulus plant. Because that plant is a variety of hop, not cannabis, the oil is legal in this country.

natalia.swindler.facebookFacebook

CBD products are touted for their healing properties. But even they would have a hard time mending the rift that’s torn apart a Colorado CBD company, which has dissolved amid dueling lawsuits, with one alleging a scheme to funnel more than $1 million to an animal sanctuary in Costa Rica and the other focusing on $300,000 in missing meds and a series of accused co-conspirators, one of whom is named Natalia Swindler.

At the center of this drama is John Merritt, the man behind Full Spectrum Nutrition Inc., a Colorado Springs operation that’s currently in limbo.

noco_hemp_expo_collins20180408_023Jacqueline Collins

The industrial-hemp industry may have gotten a nod of approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration in late May, when the agency clarified that not all compounds of cannabis fall under the Controlled Substances Act. Referencing a 2004 decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that excluded non-psychoactive cannabinoids from the federal government’s definition of marijuana, the announcement came after the DEA says it had received numerous inquiries on the matter.

1 2 3 9