Browsing: Glass Class

Shutterstock.com/ igorstevanovic

No longer bound by selfies and vacation photos, Instagram has evolved into a vast network of information for anyone interested in just about anything. Health-food recipes, political rants, sports highlights and world news can all be found on the social-media app, and now that more states have legalized medical and retail cannabis, there’s also weed – and lots of it.

You can find anything from weed and wax porn to growing tips on Instagram, and it’s a helluva lot more fun to look at than 140 characters (soon to be 280, but that’s still boring) on Twitter or your cousin’s daily updates about her baby on Facebook. Here are ten Instagram accounts any pothead will love, including nug porn, concentrate close-ups, growing tips and much more.

Lucas Fox

Owning a pot-smoking utensil can require a lot of upkeep — and anyone who uses them frequently knows how hard removing that black tar and wax reclaim can be. Many of us have friends who have forsaken pieces of glassware altogether, content with letting the grime cake up until they have to buy a new one.

Jake Westling had quite a few friends like that in Minnesota, he says. So many that he started cleaning their dirty pipes and bongs in his kitchen sink for a few dollars. Using a three-quarter gallon tank, he’d rinse any piece of glassware until it was cleaner than when it was purchased. Now, with a 65-gallon tank, he wants to clean yours.

Jacqueline Collins

There’s nothing wrong with those $5 throwaway pipes by the cash register. They serve their purpose and only burn the tip of your mustache hairs at most. But there’s much more to the glass world than cheap, generic pieces that’ll break if you move too swiftly in tight pants.

Some of the most beautiful smokeable glass is made right here in Colorado, with bongs, pipes and oil rigs made to look like anything but, instead resembling animals, aliens and lollipops. Don’t believe us? See for yourself:

florida_bongsPhoto by Stian Roenning

Jay Scott, sporting a brown ponytail and a shirt that exposes his tattoos, walks through Habatat Galleries in West Palm Beach, past Dale Chihuly’s fluorescent, coral-like cylinders and William Morris’ display of ancient tools. The 39-year-old weaves among pieces created by some of the world’s most renowned glass artists and then stops at the back of the store. Then he picks up a spiky blue alien sculpture.

His partner Lindsey, who inherited the gallery from her retired parents in 2009, flashes a coy smile as Jay twirls the $20,000 piece, revealing its bright colors and elaborate workmanship. But this one is different. It’s “functional,” Jay says.

In other words, it’s a bong. And Scott is far from the only South Florida glassblower making a killing in the luxury bong market.

bongbreak.jpg

It is a sad fact of cannabis life: glass bongs break despite the amount of care put into keeping them safe and operational. Sometimes it is an accident, other times it is on purpose but if you’ve got a bong there’s a good chance it is going to be reduced to rubble at some point in your lifetime.
Just hope you don’t have a friend their to capture it like the ten people below in our favorite bong breakage videos from YouTube.

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Scott “Trikky” Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists — Scott “Trikky” Saed — to take on a quasi-regular column we like to call: Glass Class.
This week, Trikky spins us right round with his tale of coming to work on a lathe.

Thumbnail image for Scott Saed at work.jpg
Scott “Trikky” Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists to take on a quasi-regular column we’d like to call: Glass Class.
This week, our glass guide Scott “Trikky” Saed, professes his love for the simplicity and beauty of marbles.

Scott Saed at work.jpg
Scott Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists to take on a quasi-regular column we’d like to call: Glass Class.
This week, our glass guide Scott “Trikky” Saed, runs us through percolation, diffusion and what all those terms mean (and don’t).

Scott Saed at work.jpg
Scott Saed.

To help all of us non-glass artists better understand the industry, evolution and art and science behind how our pipes, bubblers and bongs are made we’ve asked one of Colorado’s most prominent and best-known artists to take on a quasi-regular column we’d like to call: Glass Class.
This week, it’s the second half of our introduction from glass guru Scott “Trikky” Saed. He’s a humble guy with a lot of talent, but he’s always looking to learn and explore glassblowing more and spread knowledge and skill to the growing world of new-school American glassblowers and pipe makers. Enough of our flattery, we’ll let Saed introduce himself:

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