den_canna_20150808_mindful_slentz_11Scott Lentz

Colorado is no longer the only player in recreational cannabis, and early potreprenuers are branching out as legalization efforts claim victories around the country.

Meg Sanders served as CEO of Mindful during the Colorado and Illinois dispensary chain’s quick expansion post-2014; after leaving her day-to-day role with the company, she set her sights on Massachusetts. Still an owner of Mindful, Sanders has been on the East Coast lately, preparing to open three cannabis storefronts under her new Canna Provisions brand.

We recently caught up with her to learn more about her journey through legal pot and what she has planned for the future.

mcba_opportunity_summit_collins20180325_010Jacqueline Collins

Over 100 cannabis businesses and organizations just sent a letter to Congressional leaders calling for federal legalization of the plant, but their request didn’t stop there. The letter also urged federal funding be used to diversify the cannabis industry, as well as administer retroactive justice for old pot convictions and help communities impacted the most by the war on drugs.

Cannabis is still far from legal in the eyes of the federal government, but Congress has been more open-minded lately. The House of Representatives has advanced legislation that would explicitly allow banks and financial institutions to serve medical and recreational cannabis businesses in states where they are legal, and the Senate just held a hearing on the same bill.

e7d7fe39-a81c-44a0-9e27-687a4756a2fbHerbert Fuego

Know that jealous, confused feeling you get when you find out that some mediocre celebrity is worth way more than you thought? I remember when I discovered that Judge Judy made almost $50 million a year, and when I heard that the New York Mets owe former outfielder and third baseman Bobby Bonilla $1.2 million annually from 2011 to 2035 (he retired in 2001 — the Mets front office had a lot going on back then). Such revelations aren’t appalling, but they do make me scratch my head.

I was itching my hollow noggin for a solid minute after learning how popular Citral Glue has become in Denver. A mix of Gorilla Glue (or Original Glue, GG #4 and whatever else dispensaries call it to avoid a lawsuit nowadays) and Citral Skunk by Ethos Genetics, this new Glue phenom can differ on the phenotype, but my favorite has the best of both parents, with a heavy layer of milky trichomes and skunky aroma that makes you feel like you just made a wrong turn in a cornfield.

native-roots-edgewater-lentzScott Lentz

On July 15, 2015, the Colorado Board of Health rejected a petition to add post-traumatic stress disorder as a medical marijuana condition, to the vocal dismay of a packed room of veterans and medical marijuana patients. Fast forward four years, and not only is PTSD now an approved medical condition, but the board is preparing to usher in one of the most expansive sets of MMJ rules that Colorado has seen in over a decade.

natures_gift_shop_collins20170812_022 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Curtis Powell and Rebecca Goss loved to venture out to infusion events (where cannabis is infused in food), but their options as vegans were extremely limited. So they decided to start their own dinner club, which they called Vegan Stoner Club.

The couple partnered with a close friend from Rob the Art Museum in June to start creating THC-infused dinners and pairings. “We want to spread veganism and cannabis in our own unique way,” Powell says.

gruvi-beer-courtesy-2019 (1)Courtesy of Gruvi

Cannabis legalization has not only spurred a wide variety of new industries, but it’s reinvigorating some old business models. Noticing the growing interest around terpenes — plant compounds found in cannabis and hops (and fruits, flowers, coffee and pretty much anything else grown on Earth) — Niki Sawni decided to start a line of non-alcoholic beverages geared toward cannabis users.

Using terpenes to make non-alcoholic IPAs, sours and even wines, Sawni’s beverage company, Gruvi, has been able to breathe new life into sober drinks; Gruvi products are now on the shelves of 45 liquor stores and craft breweries around Colorado. We recently sat down with Sawni to learn more about how drinking terpenes without the booze can affect our experiences with cannabis.

purple_punchHerbert Fuego

Have we crossed the halfway point of 2019 already? That means we’ve profiled over 26 strains so far this year — and smoked a few dozen more just for fun.

Each strain of cannabis carries a unique flavor profile and range of effects, which are only amplified by plant genetics and growing conditions. Despite all of the variables, Colorado cannabis growers have been pumping out fire since legal recreational sales began in 2014, raising the bar for flavor and potency every year.

Customer infatuation with Cookies and Glue strains continue to influence dispensary selection in 2019, but there’s still plenty of diversity in local stores. To help narrow your choices during weed shopping, here are our favorite eight strains through the first half of the year.

purple_punchHerbert Fuego

A couple of friends and I recently lugged about fifty beers three miles up a mountain for a camping trip, then argued over who was carrying all those cans back down. My buddy’s girlfriend, meanwhile, brought two liters of pinot noir in a bag and didn’t have to worry about shit. Not only did it make me realize how dumb my drinking habits are, but it also reminded me how much I miss that purple stuff. Not purple drank (R.I.P., Pimp C), but purple weed — and I wasn’t particular about what kind during a dispensary run on a hot July afternoon.

My visit turned up several popular choices in Blackberry Kush, Northern Lights and Purple OG Kush, but I decided to try something new in Purple Punch. Or new to me, at least. Purple Punch began making a name for itself in dispensaries in 2017, with fat, supple buds that win in the looks department and trichome production. A mix of Grand Daddy Purple and Larry OG, Purple Punch’s potential to create amazing hash has made the sedative strain a hit among regular users and medical patients, while its dense, violet buds draw in excited newbs like flies to a bug zapper — and then fries them just the same.

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