mmj researchJacqueline Collins

Clinical trials that study medical marijuana are few and far between because of the plant’s federally illegal status. Colorado has been the rare exception to that rule, thanks to the passage of Amendment 64, and now the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment hopes to expand on the state’s nine currently funded MMJ studies by offering nearly $3 million more in grants for qualified research efforts.

marijuana.teen.party.thinkstock.largeThinkstock file photo

The big news about teens and marijuana in Colorado is that there isn’t big news. Just-issued federal government statistics show that the rate of cannabis use among high school students in the state is slightly less than the national average and below the percentage of those who smoked pot before Colorado voters approved legal consumption for adults more than five years ago.

In the past, anti-weed groups that regularly call for the clock to be turned back in order to protect children have tried to spin positive or neutral numbers in a negative direction, and Marijuana Policy Project spokesperson Mason Tvert, among the main proponents of Amendment 64, the 2012 measure that legalized limited recreational sales for those 21 and over, expects much the same this time around.

webp.net-resizeimage_5_Courtesy of Trill Evolutions

Since 2011, Dr. Rav Ivker has seen nearly 8,000 medical marijuana patients at his holistic medicine practice in Boulder. Over that same period, Ivker has been in steady contact with David Threlfall, owner of Denver dispensary Trill Evolutions and Boulder’s Trill Alternatives, meeting regularly to exchange information gathered from MMJ patient feedback.

In September 2017, Ivker published a book called Cannabis for Chronic Pain, which detailed MMJ prescriptions for the treatment of various pain conditions. In addition to feedback from his own patients, Ivker credits Threlfall’s patient data from his Trill dispensaries for aiding in his medical cannabis education. “They don’t teach this stuff in medical school,” Ivker explains.

chase-6344-2Maria Levitov

Trail Blazers is a series of portraits by photographer Maria Levitov spotlighting cannabis consumers from all walks of life.

Chase Livingston moved to Denver from Florida and was quick to notice the difference in cannabis laws. A professional sound engineer, Livingston uses cannabis for recreational purposes and an occasional extra push to fall asleep, but isn’t ignorant of its medical benefits.

Denver runners clubiStock.com/ersler

Combining cannabis and sports is a growing trend among amateur and professional athletes alike, but one new club in Denver is taking the term “runner’s high” to a new level. Starting this month, a group of runners interested in using cannabis to help train will meet up once a week for runs in the West Highland neighborhood.

Billing itself as the Runner’s High Run Club, the group will gather every Thursday at the Native Roots Highlands dispensary to run a 4.2-mile sativa route or a hybrid 2.1-mile route sponsored by the dispensary and Stratos, an infused-products company.

alley cat kushHerbert Fuego

Colorado has the best summer weather that a semi-active stoner could ask for: not too hot and usually not too humid. But the Mile High City has been sweatier than a New York City subway station lately, and it’s barely mid-June. To ensure that the heat wouldn’t make me snap before July 4, I needed a heavy indica to ice me down. And I found the ultimate cool customer: Alley Cat Kush.

Good for all sorts of shady fun and nefarious activities, alleys are an underrated pathway of American culture. Alley Cat Kush is just as underappreciated, with a scrappy OG lineage that’s as sweet as they come, despite the public-school name. Not to be confused with the infamous Cat Piss — a variety of Super Silver Haze that actually smells like urine — Alley Cat Kush is an unknown cross of OG Kush, which is evident the second its zesty, earthy funk hits your nostrils.

wake_bake_brunch_collins20180526_038 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Even the high holiday of 4/20 couldn’t lift Colorado’s marijuana revenue in April, according to the Colorado Department of Revenue, whose most recent figures show sales dropping that month from March’s totals. The dip from March to April isn’t a new occurrence, however; April 2017 also registered a small decline over March 2017.

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