Mix Matithipat/Shutterstock.com

A few years ago, a bill like HB 1011 would have seemed tantamount to Colorado flirting with greedy corporations hell-bent on squeezing out mom-and-pop cannabis shops while raking in mega-profits from the booming industry. But times have changed, says Representative Dan Pabon. He’s the primary House sponsor of HB 1011, which would ease restrictions on the cannabis industry’s growth potential by making the state more attractive to deep-pocketed domestic and international investors.

hemp seedShutterstock.com/Algirdas Gelazius

Colorado can now claim production of the first certified hemp seed in the United States after the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies officially validated one of its varieties. Fort Collins-based New West Genetics submitted its trademarked ELITE hemp genetics for AOSCA certification and received approval in 2017, according to an announcement from the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

“The farmer can now have confidence that what he is buying is what he expects it to be, which is below 0.3 percent [THC] and true to type,” says Duane Sinning, assistant director of the division of plant industries at the CDA.

cactus breathHerbert Fuego

I’ve never regretted my move from Arizona to Colorado a few years ago, even though I’m sure a lot of “natives” regret it for me. But while the scenery here is hard to beat, and seeing the Rocky Mountains on the way to work is a daily reminder of this state’s beauty, I’ll always miss the desert. And as I was longing for sherbet skies and shorts last week, cannabis provided a breath of home. Cactus Breath, to be exact.

Madeline St. Amour

A bill introduced in the Colorado Senate would require that a tracking agent be applied to medical and recreational marijuana and industrial hemp plants — even though the technology hasn’t been invented yet. SB 029 calls for “an agent that is applied to a marijuana plant, marijuana product, industrial hemp, or industrial hemp product and then scanned by a device,” in an attempt to improve marijuana tracking and help law enforcement officials distinguish where marijuana products originated. But some activists and businesses think the proposal goes too far.

GoToVan

Publish an incorrect dispensary address, and you could go to jail.

You heard right: Under a proposed law, any local group or company who publishes an incorrect address for a dispensary would be guilty of a felony, and subject to a mandatory $10,000 for each violation.

That’s just one of several new ideas by a trio of prohibitionist Arizona lawmakers who want to tamper with the state’s medical-marijuana program and prevent an adult-use measure from ever making the ballot.

number of colorado dispensariesScott Lentz

As we move into our fifth year of retail marijuana sales, it’s virtually impossible to ignore the boom in dispensaries around Colorado. Although certain “dry” areas don’t allow marijuana sales — Amendment 64 gave municipalities the right to choose which types of pot businesses to allow, or whether to ban them altogether within their jurisdictions — much of the state signed on for the green rush and hasn’t looked back.

The list of licensed recreational pot shops in Colorado was less than four pages long when sales began on January 1, 2014, according to the Marijuana Enforcement Division; today it runs nearly thirteen pages. Recreational cultivations have seen even larger growth, with that list of licensees going from five pages to nineteen.

EXPAND Tomas Del Coro via Wikipedia

James Terry gave United Parcel Service 32 years of his life.

The company canned him in April the first time he failed a drug test.

Terry tested positive for marijuana and amphetamines. But, as he explained to his bosses, he has a valid Arizona medical-marijuana card and a doctor’s prescription for Adderall. They wouldn’t budge.

Now Terry, a 53-year-old African-American man from Buckeye, is taking on the parcel giant in federal court.

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