Browsing: Cannabusiness

gruvi-beer-courtesy-2019 (1)Courtesy of Gruvi

Cannabis legalization has not only spurred a wide variety of new industries, but it’s reinvigorating some old business models. Noticing the growing interest around terpenes — plant compounds found in cannabis and hops (and fruits, flowers, coffee and pretty much anything else grown on Earth) — Niki Sawni decided to start a line of non-alcoholic beverages geared toward cannabis users.

Using terpenes to make non-alcoholic IPAs, sours and even wines, Sawni’s beverage company, Gruvi, has been able to breathe new life into sober drinks; Gruvi products are now on the shelves of 45 liquor stores and craft breweries around Colorado. We recently sat down with Sawni to learn more about how drinking terpenes without the booze can affect our experiences with cannabis.

seed-smith-grow-collins-2019 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s fluctuating marijuana prices may have found some stability, according to the latest data from the state Department of Revenue. The DOR’s official estimate for the average price per pound of marijuana flower in Colorado has risen slightly for the fourth straight time, up to $850 as of July 1.

Brendan McCormick, sales director for wholesale marijuana provider Bonsai Cultivation, believes wholesale marijuana prices are actually higher than the DOR’s estimates now that outdoor grows are done harvesting, reaching anywhere from $1,000 to $1,300 per pound.

jill_ellsworth_ms_rdn_-_headshot (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Gather round the joint circle, boys and girls, we’ve got a scary story: What if we told you that joint in your hands came from a moldy jungle of Petri dish pot? Unlikely, but possible.

Believe it or not, recalls over harmful molds and yeasts have hit Colorado’s cannabis industry — and probably not at a rate that reflects the real size of the problem. The state Marijuana Enforcement Division and Department of Agriculture don’t have the resources to keep an eye on every cannabis cultivation in the state, and only a handful of city health agencies have taken it upon themselves to police the safety and health impacts of their licensed pot grows. In a twenty-month span from 2017 to 2019, the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment issued at least four separate mold recalls on cannabis grows that affected dozens of dispensaries.

natures_gift_shop_collins20170812_016 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s billion-dollar marijuana industry is about to welcome some deeper pockets into the game, but first it needs to create rules to play by.

With just over five months to go until a new law expands marijuana business investment opportunities to publicly traded companies, venture capitalists and private equity firms, the Marijuana Enforcement Division has called upon dozens of marijuana industry regulators, attorneys, business owners and other stakeholders to help figure out how these new investors and owners will be able to operate in this state.

alex_pasternick_svp_binske-full_bodyCourtesy of Binske

Running a family business brings its own challenges, but adding the trials and tribulations that surround legal cannabis can create headaches no amount of weed can burn away. Alex and Jake Pasternack, the brothers behind Binske, have been able to clear the smoke and transcend it, creating a versatile cannabis brand in four states, with a heavy presence in Colorado.

To learn more about all the branching out that Binske has done, we caught up with one half of the Binkse brothers, executive vice president Alex Pasternack.

dan_anglin_headshot_2Courtesy of Grasslands

If America’s legal cannabis movement is going to be successful, it needs support from both of the major political parties and from people like Dan Anglin, a former U.S. Marine turned Republican lobbyist turned edibles entrepreneur. A veteran of Desert Storm as well as the early days of cannabis legalization in Colorado, Anglin has seen — and helped usher in — significant changes to laws and regulations surrounding cannabis edibles, while also starting a national brand of his own.

We chatted with Anglin about the early days of pot edibles, expanding his CannAmerica edibles into new states, and the political climate surrounding cannabis.

img_8682Jacqueline Collins

Despite the 4/20 holiday on April 20, Colorado dispensary sales dropped in April from March, according to new data from the state Department of Revenue.

While 4/20 is known for dispensary discounts reminiscent of those on Black Friday and lines of shoppers attracted by those deals, April’s monthly tally of $135.9 million in marijuana sales represented a 5.5 percent drop from the $142.4 million collected in March. Does that mean 4/20’s reputation is all smoke?

img_9434Jacqueline Collins

Legal marijuana has now earned over $1 billion in tax revenue for the state, according to the Colorado Department of Revenue.

Marijuana dispensary sales taxes, business licensing fees and excise taxes brought in just over $1.01 billion from January 2014 to May 2019, DOR numbers show, with dispensaries selling around $6.7 billion worth of marijuana products during that span.

cultivars_photo_by_lindsey_bartlett_15_Lindsey Bartlett

Well, that didn’t take long: Less than a week after Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed a bill that expanded marijuana business investment opportunities for publicly traded companies, venture capitalists and private equity firms, one of the state’s largest pot corporations announced plans to scoop up two commercial marijuana operations, including the largest legal outdoor cultivation in North America.

On June 5, Medicine Man Technologies announced that it had reached binding agreements with Los Sueños Farms, an outdoor marijuana farm on 36 acres outside Pueblo, as well as Mesa Organics Ltd, which owns a commercial cultivation, dispensary and extraction facility in Pueblo.

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