Browsing: Cannabusiness

noco_hemp_expo_collins20190329_035Jacqueline Collins

A coalition of hemp businesses are calling out two of the country’s most popular social media platforms for what they believe are unfair advertising policies. According to the Hemp Industries Association, algorithms lumping the plant into the same category as marijuana have prevented industrial hemp companies from advertising on Facebook and Instagram.

Although the 2018 federal Farm Bill legalized hemp for farming at the end of last year, there’s still plenty of confusion about the non-intoxicating version of marijuana, particularly with traditional media like television. But social media companies — a relatively new form of media — have also frustrated the emerging industry by deleting certain profiles and prohibiting hemp companies from advertising.

cannabis-for-dummiesCourtesy of John Wiley & Sons

Nothing is that legitimate unless there’s a book about it for dummies. My dad learned how to coach Little League basketball and install Windows 97 thanks to the triangle-headed nerd who’s been on the cover of nearly 2,500 different self-help guides, aiding millions of readers. Now, the Dummies franchise has decided that cannabis is too big to avoid, bringing in former Native Roots executive Kim Casey to author a book about the plant.

The onetime communications director for Colorado’s largest dispensary chain has experience in the cannabis industry and with its constantly changing laws that few can rival, and she puts that experience to good use in her newly published Cannabis for Dummies. We caught up with Casey to learn more about the book, including which dummies will find it most helpful.

img_1514 (1)Courtesy of Cheba Hut

Not all heroes in the cannabis space are fighting in courtrooms or grinding in the grow lab. Some heroes are making stonerific sandwiches with grape jelly and jalapeños, and the plant would be much further from social acceptance without them. Don’t believe us? Count how many parents you see in a Cheba Hut, one of the self-described original gangsters of pot-themed restaurants. Shit, there’s even a Cheba Hut in Stapleton now.

It’s funny, because mainstream acceptance was the last thing that Cheba Hut founder Scott Jennings was looking for. Although his eateries, with their pun-filled menus of sub sandwiches, have done more to help de-stigmatize cannabis than most “pioneers” who like the smell of their own edible farts, Jennings misses the rebellious side of cannabis. Still, that rebel mentality will forever stay embodied in his food, which we’re starting to see in more towns around the country.

We recently caught up with Jennings to learn more about the beginning of Cheba Hut, his menu favorites and more.

jenny-gold-and-julie-christine-facebook-Courtesy of Jenny Gold

High heels can get uncomfortable, but Jenny Gold misses the pain of walking around in them all day. The soreness was minuscule compared to her current agony, likely brought on by a tick while Gold was visiting Mexico over twenty years ago with college friends.

“You have to have a positive attitude with Lyme disease, because the people that don’t will not make it very long. There’s a lot of suicides because of the pain,” she explains. “Some people with heart problems don’t make it. So many different things can happen to your body with it.”

img_3863Jacqueline Collins

Coloradans voted for major change in November 2012, when they approved Amendment 64 and legalized recreational cannabis. Now Colorado lawmakers have approved changes that will prove almost as momentous.

Measures opening the state to social pot use and commercial cannabis delivery, as well as approving new medical conditions for medical marijuana, all passed the Colorado General Assembly this session. But even more changes could come through less sexy bills that address sunsetting laws in the state’s medical marijuana program and pot industry. These bills would create new business licenses, along with new opportunities for medical marijuana access; regulations would be eased for cannabis business owners and employees alike.

hemp-shows-hemp-clothes-noco_hemp_expo_collins2018Jacqueline Collins

Cannabis and sustainability were the focus of Fashion Group Denver’s latest discussion, “Green Is the New Green” on Tuesday, April 23. Entrepreneurs in the cannabis and fashion industries came together at Blanchard Family Wines to discuss how sustainability can be used to a company’s advantage, as well as how to create awareness for consumers about what sustainable products look like.

Part of the challenge for companies aiming for sustainability is identifying which areas have the most impact. One way to start is working with other local businesses, according to Pauline Marie Weller, owner of CBD extraction company NOHI Wellness.

natures_gift_shop_collins20170812_013 (2)Jacqueline Collins

Immigrants who’ve worked in the cannabis industry remain at risk of having their citizenship applications automatically denied if they reveal their work history, according to a new announcement by the federal government.

On April 19, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services released a policy guidance document reiterating that work in the marijuana industry is generally grounds for automatic denial of a citizenship naturalization application based on a lack of “good moral character…even if such activity has been decriminalized under applicable state laws.”

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