Browsing: Stoner MacGyver

ecto-cooler (1)Herbert Fuego

Now that the bomb cyclone has hit, we hope you’re stocked up on food — and cannabis. Since cannabis delivery is still illegal in Colorado (though a new bill might change that), your Postmates driver can’t just add a few pre-rolls to your ramen order. You’re going to need to get clever.

Here are five ways to stretch your THC as far as possible on a cold, snowy day. Godspeed, friends.

01252019_bruce_cbd_peanut_butter_0066Kenzie Bruce

Cooking with cannabis has never been more mainstream, and it’s no longer limited to just THC. You can infuse food with CBD in the same way, and the cannabinoid’s accessibility and lack of psychoactive effects have made this a popular option.

Anyone who’s made edibles before knows that high fat content is key for maximum cannabinoid infusion, as cannabinoids bind to fat cells. One of the easiest, fattiest foods for creating edibles is peanut butter (or almond butter, cashew butter or sunflower seed butter, if you’re allergic to peanuts). It infuses quickly, and unlike butter or vegetable oil, can be added to foods without further cooking.

veganillegalCourtesy of Illegal Burger

A Denver burger company is about to help you get a dose of cannabis with your lunch.

West Coast Ventures Group Corp., the parent company of Illegal Burger, which has two Denver locations (as well as outposts in Evergreen, Glendale and Arvada), has teamed up with a California company named Biolog, Inc., to test out a method of infusing cannabinoids directly into food.

The product they’ll be using is called CannaStix, a solid spice pack containing cannabis extracts that can be inserted into food — ground beef, for example — before cooking. The CannaStix pack liquefies and spreads its goodness into the food being cooked, giving it what the company describes as “a very accurate dose of fast onset, highly bioavailable cannabinoids.”

teapot-antonaiyton-2016Mark Antonation

‘Tis the cold and flu season, when judgment is never more important…and your brain is never more foggy. Thinking that your immune system is ready to withstand your degenerative ways one day too early can keep that throat sore much longer than necessary, so it’s best to play it safe by avoiding the booze and pot-smoking. Still, according to cannabis sales and delivery platform Eaze, 40 percent of cannabis consumers continue to use pot when suffering from cold and flu symptoms, and a majority of them are smoking and vaping.

While smoking and vaping definitely should be avoided when your throat is burning and covered in mucus, combustion isn’t the only way to take in the plant. Some medical marijuana products could even help alleviate the aches and pains of sinus pains, muscle aches and sore throats, while others can boost your immune system and prevent another bout of illness.

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