Search Results: probation/ (4)

den_011217_veritas_grow_slentz025Scott Lentz

For the past four years, any time local police seized cannabis in a criminal investigation, they’ve been required to care for it, either by keeping the plants alive or by returning the marijuana in a usable form to the owner. That’s no longer the case.

On January 23, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled that requiring police to store marijuana in evidence is in violation of federal law. The court issued its opinion in the case of the People v. Robert Crouse.

Crouse, a medical marijuana patient, was arrested on May 5, 2011, on charges of cultivation and possession of marijuana after police seized 55 marijuana plants and about 2.9 kilograms of marijuana product from his home. He was charged with a felony count of cultivating more than thirty marijuana plants. Crouse asserted that he was in lawful possession of the cannabis for medical purposes, and a jury acquitted him of marijuana-related drug crimes.

Medical-marijuana-sign-1.jpgadmin | Toke of the Town

The case was an anomaly in the legal state.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Federal prosecutors agreed to drop charges against Devontre Thomas, a 19-year who faced prosecution for being caught with a very small amount of weed at a federally run boarding school for Native Americans in Oregon.

A Massachusetts court ruled that smoking MED violated a man’s probation.

Two men face criminal charges connected with the failed attempt to open a cannabis resort on a reservation in South Dakota.

Following a robbery at a Portland dispensary, police said Oregon pot shops are not attracting a disproportionate amount of crime .

The DEA’s criteria for whether a home contains a grow operation are very broad.

The New York Times reports on Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte’s unapologetically brutal war on drugs.

In Connecticut, schoolchildren will used seized grow lights to produce food.

The Kind investigates the judging of High Times Cannabis Cups, and speaks to Max Montrose, a connoisseur and critic of the high stakes process.

Vice learns about life as a “ trim bitch” on an illegal weed farm. The money is good, but conditions aren’t and sexual harassment is a problem.

Rapper Snoop Dogg is the executive producer of the new MTV weed comedy “Mary + Jane.”

Recently retired NFL player Eugene Monroe has a new column at The Cannabist.

Frankie Schnarrs, owner of Frankie’s Sports Pub in Olympia, Wash. said he’ll continue to allow patrons to use cannabis despite a recent fine and suspended liquor license, which he’s also ignoring. “I want them to take my license from me. They can go to Hell,” he told a reporter. “Get out of here. Get off my property.”

The Guardian hangs out with three elderly British women in Amsterdam, while they try pot for the first time. They enjoyed themselves at a playground, swinging on the swings.

Artist Tony Greenhand is well paid to roll joints that resemble guns, animals and other elaborate shapes.

Leafly looks back at jazz great Louis Armstrong’s long fondness for cannabis, which he called “the gage.”

Butane extraction has reached the U.K.

Cannabis tampons.

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Tom Daubert was sentenced to 5 years of probation in September 2012 for a 2011 federal raid on his medical cannabis collective, Montana Cannabis. Daubert maintained his innocence through his trial despite the feds not allowing him to raise Montana’s medical marijuana for his defense, and was able to strike a deal keeping him from 20 years in prison.
But now he says that after five years on probation and watching his former business partners, Richard Flor, die in prison, he says enough is enough.

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Rest in peace, Lori Burnam, 66, of Missoula, Montana. Lori was suffering from emphysema and advanced cancer

Burnam’s Bout with Cancer, Emphysema & Glaucoma Has Ended, But Her Fight for Common Sense Marijuana Laws Remains
 
Lori Burnam of Hamilton, Montana — a much-loved and admired champion of medical marijuana patients’ rights — has died. But the principles she stood for and the goals she worked for will not be forgotten or neglected, according to Chris Lindsey, president of Montana Next, a marijuana education group.
“Lori Burnam’s legacy is one of compassion for others and respect for scientific facts and reality,” Lindsey said. “Thousands of Montanans have been inspired by the kindness of her life and her effective advocacy for common sense marijuana laws, and all of us intend to continue working for Lori’s goals.”