Browsing: Dispensaries

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Graphic: movies.popcrunch.com

​A bill has been introduced in the Kansas Legislature to legalize marijuana for medical use.

Although the bill, which comes from Rep. Gail Finney (D-Wichita), doesn’t have much a chance, “It’s the right thing to do,” Finney said.
Her bill was introduced the same week that lawmakers voted to make the Sunflower State the first in the nation to outlaw fake marijuana, reports David Klepper of the Kansas City Star.
Finney’s bill, like medical marijuana laws adopted in New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Maine, would set up state-registered “compassionate care centers” where those with a doctor’s recommendation can buy cannabis.
The bill would require that all medical marijuana used in the state be grown in Kansas.

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Photo: CBS47.com
Rick Morse says he will fight for what he believes is right until officers take him away in handcuffs

​An arrest warrant has been issued for the owner of a Fresno, California medical marijuana dispensary.

Rick Morse, who owns the Medmar Clinic in Fresno’s Tower District, is accused of illegally running the dispensary, reports Alicia Coates of CBS47.tv.
Morse’s contempt of court arraignment was Wednesday but he didn’t show, resulting in the court issuing a felony warrant for his arrest.
Surprisingly, local TV station CBS47 found Morse at his Medmar clinic Wednesday night, and he didn’t seem overly worried about the warrant.
“I would rather go by my constitution than what some void order says,” Morse told CBS47.

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Photo: www.agreenercountry.com
Coloradans may have to go to the polls in November to defend medical marijuana dispensaries from the Legislature.

​Sensible Colorado, a medical marijuana advocacy organization, has announced it plans to place an initiative intended to “secure patient access to medical marijuana” on the Colorado ballot this November.

The idea, reports Michael Roberts at Westword, is to let voters establish regulations more friendly to the medical marijuana industry than those likely to be passed by the Legislature.
The group will file a statewide ballot initiative Thursday at the Office of Legislative Council in the State Capitol.

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Photo: Flickr / Westword
New Mexico: Land of Enchantment. And, well, taxing the sick.

​New Mexico’s Legislature has been looking mighty hungrily at the state’s medical marijuana program as a source of tax revenue. But according the state’s Tax and Revenue Department, such a tax could cause patients to turn to the black market.

A 25 percent excise tax on medical marijuana could potentially raise about $1.2 million for the state, according to the Legislative Finance Committee’s fiscal impact report on Sen. John Sapien’s bill, SB 56, reports Marjorie Childress at The New Mexico Independent.
The analysis estimated a typical patient spends $6,256 annually on medical marijuana, and would pay about $1,564 in excise tax per year.

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Graphic: thefreshscent.com

​The auditorium was packed Tuesday, but only five people voiced their opinions on the proposed tightening of Rhode Island’s medical marijuana law during a public hearing held by the Department of Health.

Two individuals spoke, as well as representatives of three organizations: the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Society, and the Rhode Island Patient Advocacy Coalition, reports Talia Buford at The Providence Journal.
The bill, backed by two state legislators — who are, surprise, surprise, both retired police officers — is designed to “close loopholes” in the state’s medical marijuana law.

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Graphic: Reality Catcher
If you’re a marijuana dispensary operator, Wells Fargo now says your money’s not green enough. Or maybe too green. Anyway, they don’t want your business.

​Wells Fargo — which, according to medical marijuana dispensary owners, was the only bank in Colorado which wanted their business — has stopped opening new accounts for dispensaries.

Cristie Drumm, spokeswoman for Wells Fargo, said the bank is looking at state and federal laws to determine what risk the bank runs in working with dispensaries, reports John Ingold at The Denver Post.
“We’re not actively opening accounts with these businesses at this time,” Drumm said.
The bank hasn’t said if it would close its existing dispensary accounts, but the news has many dispensary owners wondering if they might lose a key part of their business plans.
“We wouldn’t have a bank to put our money in,” said Ryan Vincent of The Health Center in Denver. “I don’t know what we would do. We’d probably have to start rallying to put together a credit union.”

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Photo: brooklynmachineworks
Do you enjoy filling out paperwork? Then you’d love operating a dispensary in Denver.

​Medical marijuana dispensaries in Denver will soon be needing papers — lots of them — and we aren’t talking about Zig-Zags.

The Mile-High City starts accepting dispensary license applications on February 8. All dispensaries operating in Denver must file such an application by March 1, reports Patricia Calhoun at Westword.
This application is in addition to the regular city sales tax license dispensaries already had to apply for by December 15 in order to be exempted from zoning provisions and other restrictions, including a 1,000-foot buffer zone between dispensaries and schools, day-care centers, and even other dispensaries.
More than 400 dispensaries applied for the sales tax license, according to Westword.
Now, to stay in business, they’ll need to apply for a dispensary license, as well.

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Graphic: www.agreenercountry.com

​The Colorado State Senate has passed a bill designed to prevent recreational pot users from exploiting the law to obtain medical marijuana.

The Senate voted 34-1 on Monday to back Senate Bill 109, which will now go to the State House, reports The Associated Press.
The bill bars doctors from writing recommendations inside medical marijuana dispensaries.
It also requires that doctors review a person’s medical history and give them a full exam before recommending that they legally use medical marijuana.
Patients between 18 and 21 would be required to get the approval of two doctors, which is already required for patients under 18.

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Photo: Lori Horwedel/AnnArbor.com
A plethora of pot pipes: potential profits for an exhibitor at the Michigan Caregivers Cup

​Despite the forced cancellation of their medical marijuana competition and a brief mix-up over lecture admission prices, the Michigan Caregivers Cup is drawing plenty of visitors and continuing through the weekend, according to event organizers.

The contest, which would have been held Saturday, was canceled after law enforcement threatened that participants could be criminally prosecuted, reports Lee Higgins at AnnArbor.com.

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11 News
Olathe: Cut us in on the cash, and you can stay

​Just like that, the Town of Olathe, Colorado says it will now charge medical marijuana dispensaries an annual fee of $3,000 to operate.

The Olathe Town Board voted unanimously for the new ordinance on Monday night, according to Town Administrator Scott Harold, reports KKCO. Two board members weren’t present for the vote.
Harold said the board “feels the ordinance is necessary” to “regulate” dispensaries. He claimed the board had been “talking and finalizing the wording of it” (translation: figure out how much we can shake them down for) since June.
Oh well, Toke of the Town supposes it could be worse. The Board could have tried to ban dispensaries outright.
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