Browsing: Hemp

nfl_kickoff_8sept_2016_36_of_78_Brandon Marshall

Songwriter and OneRepublic frontman Ryan Tedder has joined the throngs of musicians – from Willie Nelson to Nathaniel Rateliff – who are getting into the cannabis, CBD and hemp fields.

But instead of launching a strain named after himself, Tedder is putting out an “all-new hemp extract sparkling water” called Mad Tasty that promises to bring “wellness to the masses in the tastiest way yet.”

veritas_farm_collins20190807_011Jacqueline Collins

Many American farmers were handed seeds of opportunity in October, when the United States Department of Agriculture released its much-anticipated regulations for farming hemp. The new federal rules came nearly a year after Congress legalized hemp farming, and almost half a decade after the Colorado Department of Agriculture established its own program for farming hemp. And this state’s rules don’t exactly line up with the ones just announced by the feds.

Two years after voters approved Amendment 64, legalizing recreational marijuana, Colorado decided to opt into the 2014 Farm Bill, a federal law that allowed states to create pilot programs for hemp licensing. As a result, Colorado is now one of the largest producers of hemp in the country. While every Colorado farmer growing hemp will probably have to change a few things once the federal regulations take hold, those same regulations also bring credibility to an industry essentially stuck in a federal gray area, according to Corey Cox, an attorney with Vicente Sederberg who represents clients in Colorado’s hemp industry.

cbd-sign-aurora-petrovic-2019Nina Petrovic

Driving around the residential streets of Colorado, you might see signs that look like they’re about to announce a garage sale but instead are advertising hemp or CBD oil. Like the homemade one pictured here, on Iliff Avenue in Aurora, hawking 1,444 milligrams of CBD oil for $60.

“There’s a lot of concern, or growing concern, as we see a lot of the CBD market grow and grow,” says Hollis Glenn, director of the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s inspection and consumer services. “You see CBD being sold in places like gas stations, and the industry is so new that there’s no directive on how it should be manufactured.”

tissueculture_shelf_frb8372web_croppedCourtesy of Front Range Biosciences

A Colorado research laboratory is teaming up with a space-tech firm and University of Colorado Boulder research institute to send hemp and coffee into outer space, in order to learn more about the power plants.

Front Range Biosciences, an agriculture technology company that researches hemp and other cultivation aspects, just announced a plan that will transport hemp and coffee tissue cultures to the International Space Station, where they will be cultivated and studied for potential genetic mutations that the plant cells undergo at different stages of gravity, which could have commercial and medical applications.

cbdJacqueline Collins

According to a recent survey published by the Grocery Manufacturers Association, over 75 percent of Americans assume that commercial CBD products are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration — which is not true.

Out of the 2,056 Americans who participated in the survey, 76 percent of respondents assumed that CBD products were already regulated by the FDA, while 16 percent of respondents were unsure of whether CBD products were regulated by the FDA or not — adding up to a 92 percent rate of confusion over CBD production and regulation.

img_0278-2Jacqueline Collins

Most hemp farmers across the country got a big boost when the United States Department of Agriculture released its first round of industrial hemp regulations earlier this week; the new rules took effect today, October 31.

“I applaud the USDA for moving forward on hemp rulemaking and recognizing hemp production as an agricultural activity,” Senator Cory Gardner said in a statement after the regulations were announced. “Legalized hemp has the potential to be a major boon to agricultural communities across Colorado, giving farmers another viable and profitable option for their fields.”

But for farmers in states like Colorado, where hemp has been an established crop for almost five years, the new rules might not seem so progressive.

terrell-davis-2011-jacksons-thackeray (1)Aaron Thackeray

Society has a complicated and sometimes conflicted relationship with professional athletes, but if there’s anything about jocks that we all want to emulate, it’s those hot, chiseled bods.

Our opportunities to gain those physiques traditionally have started with buying shoes or training equipment endorsed by current all-stars, but now retired athletes have entered the fray, pushing everything from oddly shaped sneakers to copper-infused bracelets. I grew up knowing Chicago White Sox slugger Frank Thomas as the Big Hurt, a mountain of a man who yawned while jacking dingers across Lake Michigan. Today younger generations know him more for his big dick, jacking wives from their husbands in a Nugenix commercial.

Retired athletes recently found one more honey hole for their spokesperson services, as hemp and marijuana become more mainstream. Ex-NBA or NFL players opening weed dispensaries or starting infused products brands are actually nothing new — Cliff Robertson, Floyd Landis, LenDale White and Al Harrington have all founded cannabis companies or dabbled in partnerships with the industry, and lesser-known retired players have made a career out of advocating cannabis use, hitting the talk-show and conference circuit for speaking gigs — but those opportunities pale in comparison with what the CBD industry is offering right now.

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