Browsing: Medical

congress_pot300.jpg
theskunk.org
Congress respecting the will of the people? What’s next, democracy?

​Eleven years later, it’s about time: The U.S. Senate today passed historic legislation to end the decade long ban on implementation of the medical marijuana law Washington, D.C., voters passed with 69 percent of the vote in 1998.

“This marks the first time in history that Congress has changed a marijuana law for the better,” said Aaron Houston, director of government relations for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), based in D.C.
The “Barr Amendment,” a rider attached to appropriations for the District of Columbia, has forbidden D.C. from extending the legal protection of Initiative 59, the “Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Initiative of 1998,” to qualified medical marijuana patients.
The amendment has long been derided as an unconscionable intrusion by the federal government into the District’s affairs, according to MPP.

cannabis-1.holiday.wreath1.jpg
Cannabis Therapy Institute

​The Cannabis Holiday Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Boulder today will be the largest gathering of medical cannabis businesses ever held in Colorado, according to organizers, and will highlight the growing industry and its importance to the economy.
Several new businesses are using this as their debut appearance, including two magazines and several wellness centers. 
The Fair is a full-day public outreach event designed to answer questions about cannabis as medicine and how to become a legal patient in Colorado.
The  event is free and open to the public.
There will be displays from medical cannabis dispensaries as well as other hemp and cannabis-related businesses, video seminars, gifts, contests and prizes.
State Senator Chris Romer and Denver City Councilman Charlie Brown will attend from 12 noon until 1 p.m.

medical_marijuanapreview.jpg
Graphic: mrc.la
Compassion and common sense: a good combination in La Puente

​In an inspiring show of common sense, the La Puente, Calif., City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to allow six medical marijuana dispensaries to open.

The first pot shop in town, La Puente Medical Cannabis Center, opened two weeks ago. Employees there declined to comment, reports James Wagner at the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.
City officials appeared not to take very seriously the grandstanding tactics of pot-hating Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley. Media whore Cooley last month said he would prosecute medical marijuana shops — even those protected by city ordinances.
“If they sell it, it’s illegal,” Cooley’s spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons told the Daily Bulletin on Wednesday.

index.php.jpeg
Green Kross Cooperative
Another casualty of D.A. Bonnie Dumanis’ medical marijuana crackdown, in which she invites federal DEA agents to thwart the will of the people of California

​A San Diego medical marijuana dispensary owner pleaded guilty Thursday to three federal charges.

Joseph Nunes was arrested when federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents and local law enforcement executed a search warrant at Green Kross Cooperative on Sept. 9. The agents said they seized $38,000 in cash from the dispensary.
The Green Kross warrant was part of a crackdown involving raids of 14 marijuana dispensaries in San Diego County.
​San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis, who oversaw the Sept. 9 raids (and who seems to be quite a lover of headlines), issued a press release gloating about how she shut down the operations of “drug dealers.” Yet, according to Dave Maass at Safe Access San Diego, the preening D.A. provided very little evidence to back up her claims.

state-flag-colorado.jpg
wussuphater.wordpress.com
Cannabinated Colorado: Medical marijuana regulations are coming to the Mile High State.

​Two Colorado legislators today unveiled their plan for regulating medical marijuana in the state via an extraordinary guest editorial in The Denver Post.

“Colorado voters spoke clearly when they passed a constitutional amendment that permitted medical marijuana use, but the amendment left many oversight and regulatory questions unanswered,” wrote State Sen. Chris Romer (D-Denver) and State Rep. Tom Massey (R-Poncha Springs) in the opinion piece. “That is why we are acting in 2010 to honor the intent of the constitution and help patients.”

Stop Beating Marijuana Patients.jpg
Graphic: Jim Wheeler
Safe access to marijuana remains a distant dream to many patients — even in states which have legalized medical use

​One by one, the lights are winking out. In city after city, town after town, in states where medical marijuana is now legal, patients who had dared hope they would at last have safe access to the medicine recommended by their doctors are having those hopes dashed.

The problem? Political cowardice and the panicked reaction of the status quo.

Every week brings more news of freaked out city councils and county boards of supervisors who desperately want to appear to be “doing something” — anything — about the proliferation of marijuana dispensaries.

This phenomenon is so far mostly confined to California and to a lesser extent Colorado, but it’s unfortunately also starting to happen in Michigan and Montana.
Rather than showing true leadership by showing genuine concern for patients and communities, too many local government officials are going for the easy, knee-jerk reaction. The level of disregard for the intentions of the voters — who clearly expressed their will by legalizing medical marijuana — is breathtaking.

Uncle_Sam_(pointing_finger).jpg
Painting: James Montgomery Flagg
Hey, Congress: I want YOU to respect the will of the people

​In a historic move, Congress is poised to end a decade-long ban on implementation of the medical marijuana law passed with a 69 percent majority by voters in the District of Columbia in 1998.

Known as the Barr Amendment, after its author, then-Rep. Bob Barr (R-GA), the provision — a rider attached to appropriations for D.C. — has forbidden the District from extending legal protection to qualified medical marijuana patients.
The Barr Amendment has been derided by advocates for years as an unconscionable intrusion by the federal government into the democratically expressed will of the District’s people.
The omnibus spending bill that Democratic leaders will be bringing to a vote in the House later this week removes this onerous provision. Once both chambers of Congress approve the final language and the President signs it, the Barr Amendment will no longer block medical marijuana in the District of Columbia.

Medicinal_Marijuana.jpg
Photo: Coaster420
Medical marijuana: Will Pennsylvania become the Keystoned State? Oh, yeah… Stereotypes bad.

​ The good news, according to the Harrisburg Patriot-News, is that Pennsylvania is finally having a discussion about medical marijuana.

The bad news? “In our socially conservative state this is likely as far as the debate will go on the issue,” the editorial says.
Pennsylvania’s House Health and Human Services Committee last week heard from patients, doctors, and medical marijuana advocates who said the state should legalize the herb for those suffering debilitating medical conditions.

Marijuana Flag-map_of_Maine.jpg
Graphic: Reality Catcher
The State of Maine will be selling marijuana by spring.

​A 14-member task force assigned by Gov. John E. Baldacci is trying to iron out the kinks in Maine’s new medical marijuana law so it can be implemented by its deadline at the beginning of April, 2010.

The committee, made up of state officials, police, medical professionals and others, meets today to address potential problems in the law voters approved in November.
The new law allows for state-run medical marijuana dispensaries, and also expands the conditions for which medical marijuana can be legally used in Maine.
Medical marijuana has been legal in the state since the Maine Medical Marijuana Act of 1998. This year’s voter initiative was designed to solve the conundrum of where those patients, legal for 11 years now, are supposed to buy their medicine.

800px-Medical-marijuana-shop.jpg
Photo: Laurie Avocado
Whenever City Council’s in session, look out.

​San Diego’s task force on medical marijuana will present its land-use recommendations to the city council today.

According to the task force, any businesses that dispense medical marijuana in San Diego should be required to apply for a land use permit, and should only be allowed in industrial or commercial zones, Tom Fudge reports at KPBS.
The task force also recommends that dispensaries shouldn’t be located within 1,000 feet of a school, or within 500 feet of another dispensary.