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Photo: Bennelliott
Verne Prison on the Isle of Portland, henceforth forever known as “that prison that lets prisoners grow weed.”

​British prison guards unwittingly allowed a convicted drug dealer to grow marijuana in his cell — and even decorate one four-foot plant as a Christmas tree.

Mohamed Jalloh, 28, must be very persuasive. He convinced jail staff for at least five months that his fast-growing cannabis crop was only tomato plants, according to reporter Brian Flynn in The Sun newspaper.
(Please God, give me guards that trusting if I’m ever locked up again.)
Jalloh, who’s serving eight years on a drug charge, got so cocky, he put festive seasonal decorations on one of the plants “to brighten his cell” at Verne Prison on the Isle of Portland, Dorset, U.K.
Eventually he was ratted out by an envious inmate. Guards then identified the plants using Google image search, according to The Sun. (There you have it: There are actually still people in existence who don’t know what marijuana looks like. Prison guards, at that!)
“You could see the plants from the grounds as his cell looks on to the education department and communal outside area,” a source told The Sun. “They were on show for the world to see.”

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Photo: Henna
Careful flashing that oregano around just anywhere.

​A Clarksville, Tenn., man faces charges after being indicted on allegations he robbed a girl at gunpoint for what turned out to be what must have been some very nice-looking oregano.

Victor L. Little was arrested Dec. 3 from circuit court on an aggravated assault charge. His bond was set at $15,000, reports Tavia D. Green of the Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle. (No, I’m not making that newspaper name up.)
According to the indictment, Little, 18, along with Keith A. Jackson, 18, and Timothy E. Ogburn, 19, are charged with aggravated robbery and assault.
On Sept. 10, the men and a juvenile allegedly robbed two females at gunpoint, thinking they had a bag of marijuana in their possession.
It turned out to be oregano used as a prop in a school project.

Photo: Aaron Thackeray, Westword
Herbal Connections dispensary, located at 2209 W. 32nd Avenue in Denver, offers a variety of strains including Pineapple Kush.

​​Colorado’s medical marijuana community got a bit of editorial support today from a very influential source — leading newspaper The Denver Post.

In an Dec. 5 Op-Ed piece with the headline “Cities shouldn’t ban dispensaries,” the Post comes down firmly on the side of supporting the will of the Rocky Mountain State’s people as expressed in the 2000 voter initiative which legalized medical pot.
“Far too many muncipalities — including Greeley, Castle Rock, Colorado Springs and Broomfield — are just outright banning the dispensaries, citing the fact that the sale of marijuana is still illegal under federal law,” the Post editorial said.
“We think cities have a role in regulating businesses in a manner that reflects local needs and values,” the Post said, “but some seem to have reacted in haste or simply hope to pass the regulatory buck to other authorities.”
“It is wrong for cities to issue blanket bans,” the Post said. “The Colorado Constitution grants residents with debilitating medical conditions the right to acquire and possess medical marijuana.”


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Chronic Art
Snoop Dogg: “Buy my medicine, buy my medicine…”

​Cliff Maynard of Pittsburgh has blazed a unique trail on the stoner art scene. The 37-year-old creates amazing mosaics using the humble medium of used roach papers from smoked joints.

Amazingly, this is just something Cliff does in his spare time. He’s one of Pittsburgh’s finest tattoo artists at his day job. But it’s his roach paper Chronic Art that has captured the imagination of folks nationwide.
As a student at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, Cliff had the opportunity to take inspiration from the great mosaics of the past. “I was studying mosaics in school,” Maynard remembers. “I just remember sort of making this connection in my head between the tiles and roach papers.”
His roach paper portraits include iconic rock star stoners like Jimi Hendrix, Jerry Garcia, and John Lennon, and hemped hop rap stars like Snoop Dogg and Method Man.

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Photo: David Shankbone
With views like this AND legal pot, what’s not to like about Breckenridge?

​The place looks like a storybook, and on January 1, the story’s getting a lot cooler. Plans for implementation of a voter-approved citywide legalization of marijuana in the Colorado ski resort town of Breckenridge are nearly complete.

In response to the voter initiative which passed Nov. 3, when an overwhelming 71 percent of Breckenridge voters approved removing all penalties for pot, the town council has prepared a draft ordinance making it legal for those 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of dank.

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C3 Collective
A sample of the wares at Walnut Creek’s C3 Collective.

​Five hundred bucks a day adds up fast. Brian Hyman, director of the only medical marijuana dispensary in Walnut Creek, California, can tell you that.

Hyman’s dispensary, the C3 Collective, has been fined $500 a day by Walnut Creek since shortly after opening in June.
As people discover all the time, once you’re in city government’s crosshairs, they can find something to for which to harass you. In C3’s case, the official reasons have been things like violation of a general nuisance clause in the city code that prohibits any organization that violates federal law.
Sounds reasonable enough, until you remember that federal law recognizes no such thing as medical marijuana. Seems even if the Obama Administration is reluctant to enforce federal marijuana laws, Walnut Creek isn’t willing to back down.

Smoking innovation the Incredibowl, born of Colorado’s percolating pot scene, has become the first product ever to win double Cannabis Cup awards.

The high-tech medical marijuana pipe, as Westword‘s Joel Warner puts it, “designed by weed-smoking Colorado whiz kids,” did quite well for itself at the 22nd annual High Times Cannabis Cup awards in Amsterdam.

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Photo: Derrylwc
Mendocino fave OG Kush at about 6 weeks into flowering.

​Two members of the Mendocino County, Calif., Board of Supervisors’ Health and Human Services Committee say their reworking of the county’s medical marijuana ordinance is ready to be sent to the full board, reports Mike A’Dair of The Willits News.

Committee member John McCowen said the draft revision, prepared along with Kendall Smith, would be sent to the board sometime next month.
Even while the proposed ordinance clamps down on some aspects of medical marijuana growing, it loosens others.
The indoor growing of marijuana would e limited to a space of no more than 100 square feet, and outdoor cultivation would “not subject residents of neighboring parcels who are of normal sensitivity to objectionable odors.” (You know, every time I read something like that, I try to imagine why anyone would find the odor of fresh marijuana “objectionable.”) 

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DEA
“Drug money” and cartel weapons seized by the Mexican Federales and the DEA

​Promised security help from the United States for Mexico’s drug war, including helicopters and scanners for contraband detection, has been held up by bureaucratic red tape and is slow in arriving, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), Ken Ellingwood reports in the Los Angeles Times.

The GAO examination said that just $26 million, or 2 percent of the nearly $1.3 billion appropriated for security aid, had been spent by the end of September.
The multi-year Merida Initiative is intended to help Mexican officials, who are locked in a bloody three-year offensive against illegal drug cartels. The Mexicans have complained that the promised American help has been too slow to reach them.

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Graphic: Reality Catcher
The Michigan Department of Community Health has been overwhelmed by the number of medical marijuana applications and calls.

​A lack of resources has left the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) unable to process medical marijuana permit applications within the 15-day time frame specified under state law, the agency announced today on the state website.

With an average of 66 applications received every day, the agency has fallen behind and says it is just now processing applications from late September.

MDCH is asking users of the system for patience while they work out the kinks in the system, Eartha Jane Meltzer reports at The Michigan Messenger.
“The statute currently allows for a copy of the application submitted to serve as a valid registry if identification if the card is not issued within 20 days of its submission to the department,” the MDCH explains. “At this time, we are unable to process the valid cards within the statutory time frame with the resources available to us.”
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