Marijuana and Cannabis News

Medical marijuana and children:Washington Post video looks at CBD and seizures
By William Breathes in Medical, News
Thursday, April 25, 2013 at 1:20 pm

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The Washington Post in a video segment yesterday detailed two sets of parents using cannabis to control seizures in their children - specifically the cannabinoid CBD.

In the cannabis community, this is common knowledge and the reason why many patients seek marijuana as their therapy. Nevertheless, it's a powerful video to watch as these two kids -- like dozens if not hundreds of others -- find relief from their painful affliction with cannabis.

Footage of tiny Emily Rollins seizing and then crying out in pain are heartbreaking, especially when contrasted with her happy, smiling demeanor when she's been given her meds.

The video also talks with Heather Jackson who discuss how if any two anti-seizure medications don't work, the probability of anything else working dips to about 20 percent. Jackson should know, her son Zaki also suffers from seizures. He was in that boat until his parents tried some CBD oil with him. He went from having 200 seizures one night to none the next.

Focused in Colorado, the video details a greenhouse grow outside of Boudler where growers are focusing on cultivating high-CBD plants as well as a special program that creates oils specifically for sick children. It also features an interview with Dr. Alan Shackelford - a well known medical cannabis advocate and Harvard-trained physician in Denver. For the rest, watch the video below (sorry about the ad before it):


In the cannabis community, this is common knowledge and the reason why many patients seek marijuana as their therapy. Back in February we brought you the story of Erin and Adam from Aurora, Colorado and Adam's daily fight with epilepsy. He uses marijuana to battle the pain and convulsions and muscle-tightening and - like the kids in the Washington Post video - a powerful testimony to the relief marijuana can bring for our fellow human beings battling serious conditions.

Without federal approval and without marijuana being de-scheduled (or at the very least re-scheduled) from a Schedule 1 controlled substance, there's little hope for any major research in this country on cannabis and epilepsy or any other condition.

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