Search Results: thanksgiving (21)

img_2820Herbert Fuego

While Mom is in the kitchen obsessing over her cranberry sauce and Grandpa is watching football on the couch, we’ll be upstairs taking a quick hit from one of our favorite strains. Whether you’re in the mood for the sour flavor of Super Lemon Haze or stanky smell of Girl Scout Cookies, head to your local dispensary and pick up something to help ease you through the family obligations this holiday season.

While you’re at it, be sure to check out Herbert Fuego’s advice on how to stay high on the sly while you’re at family dinner.

1. Super Lemon Haze

As the smell implies, smoking Super Lemon Haze is like inhaling a handful of Lemonheads. The delicious sour flavor is complemented by a subtle but spicy and earthy back end, making it a great appetizer before dinner.

Quick and effective, Super Lemon Haze brings an instantly uplifting high that can last for hours. Smoke it with caution your first time, though, because some users report a lack of focus or heightened paranoia. Still, the majority enjoy a euphoric buzz and an easy state of mind, good for harmless laughs or a mindless walk around the neighborhood.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I really want to get high before Thanksgiving dinner, but it’ll be with some family from around the country, and a lot of them aren’t cool with weed. Any advice?
Chief Toker

Dear Chief: I faced the same dilemma in my college years, but I was lucky enough to have Thanksgiving without a Catholic grandmother or baby-faced niece staring at me from across the table, so my parents always got over it. I smoked out of one-hitters and apples and blew in toilet-paper rolls covered in dryer sheets to hide the smell back then, but you can be much more inconspicuous now.

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Gary M. Stolz, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Let’s get really basted.

​Few things in life are as natural a fit as THC and Thanksgiving. I mean, come on – a holiday which heralds hoggishness, and an herb which makes you hella hungry? We’re talking a hook-up made in hemp heaven.
But wait! That’s not the only way marijuana can improve your Thanksgiving experience this year. I feel a list coming on.
1) Make the most of the best pig-out chance of the year. Any self-respecting stoner is going to augment his or her capacity for Thanksgiving largesse by generously applying nature’s favorite appetite stimulant.
To be sure you’ve got your bases properly covered, Toke of the Town suggests you consider a new round of smoking between each course of the meal. At the very least, toke up again before dessert.
If you’re in a situation where smoking ain’t cool, don’t trip. Just prepare and consume some marijuana edibles ahead of time – and if the gathering’s going to last awhile, bring along some extras in your pocket. (Toke of the Town recommends sativa strains; a heavy indica, especially combined with all that tryptophan from the turkey, could make you drowsy.)
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Possibly the largest legal pot company in the world.

Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.

Canada’s Canopy Growth Corp. will acquire Mettrum Health Corp. for C$430M, creating a dominant Canadian player.

Vice examines 280E, the tax code provision used to tax marijuana businesses more than other businesses.

Warehouse rents are skyrocketing in legal states. But the New York Stock Exchange IPO of cannabis real estate trust Innovative Industrial Properties went nowhere, following the Sessions nomination.

The BBC calls Albania, a small, poor country in southeast Europe, the continent’s “ outdoor cannabis capital.

The industry could create an opportunity for clean energy technologies like “ renewable microgrids.

LAWeekly asks if small cannabis businesses can survive legalization.

Accounting Today says, “ The Cannabis Industry Needs Accountants.

Pot was a hot topic at the 2016 Wine Industry Expo. For more see here.

Financial firm Cowen said legalization is bad for beer sales. MarketWatch disagrees.

Dispensaries offered discounts for “ Green Friday.” (The shopping day after Thanksgiving.)

The BBC profiles John Stewart, an executive who was CEO of Purdue Pharma, which sells the opioid Oxycontin and now leads a MED company in Canada.

There’s an incubator that aims to turn formerly-incarcerated drug dealers into legal entrepreneurs.

Century Bank in Massachusetts openly works with pot businesses.

A new site called The Cannifornian will cover legalization in the state.  Parent company Digital First Media also owns The Denver Post and its site The Cannabist.

RAND Corporation scholar Beau Kilmer editorializes in favor of the state legalization experiments.

Denver’s social use measure may face legal challenges. Juneau, Ak.’s first dispensary opened and sold out in three hours.

Maryland’s pot regulator has hired a diversity consultant, after it failed to award any of its initial 30 licenses to African-Americans. It has also given preliminary approval for 102 MED dispensary licenses. The names will be made public this week.

Florida’s MED community has few friends in Tallahassee. The new law will also undermine the state’s largely disregarded bong ban.

The Cannabist meets Rilie Ray Morgan, the 66-year old man who championed MED in North Dakota.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) is launching a new effort to use pot taxes to build apartments for the chronically homeless.

Massachusetts may delay implementing aspects of its REC law. Maine will recount its REC vote. MED legalization is on the table in Ireland and South Africa.

British politician Nick Clegg called for legalization. Vice sketches out what a legal U.K. market for recreational drugs could look like.

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Denver International Airport is suffering through one of its busiest weeks of the year as Thanksgiving travelers jam the ticket and security lines, baggage claims and cab stands, and the restaurants and souvenir shops. And while their suitcases may be full of warm sweaters, early holiday presents and leftover pie, travelers won’t be able to find many last-minute marijuana-themed souvenirs while they’re waiting for a delayed flight.
And soon, DIA may not allow the sale of any pot-themed merchandise at all.

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Thanksgiving week in Amsterdam for the last 26 years or so has been a haven for cannabis users and those wanting to celebrate marijuana culture thanks to the High Times Cannabis Cup.
But it seems that after more than a quarter-century of generally being hassle-free, the Dutch are cracking down on events and have shut down the main expo for the event and are strictly enforcing five-gram possession laws and a total ban on solvent-based concentrates.

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Natalie Martinez.
Cannabuddha Biscuits.

Considering just how much food will crowd onto your Thanksgiving table this year, it could almost be considered rude not to get baked before dinner. After all, if your Aunt Margaret went to the trouble of making her special marshmallow sweet potato soufflé, you damn well better have a few bites!
But what if instead of hitting a quick bowl in the basement or rocking a few puffs of the vape pen in the bathroom, you could integrate some THC into your meal from the get-go? That’s what Natalie Martinez, an L.A.-based chef for the popular DIY weed-cooking website Stoner’s Cookbook, suggests: a few cannabis dishes, especially on the early side of the meal, can make all the difference when helping you politely try everyone’s contributions and stay hungry enough for dessert. Amanda Lewis at the LA Weekly has more.

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Straight off the cooling rack, the pie hit all the right notes. Its filling was gooey and sweet, full of chewy chunks of apple, its Dutch-style crust crumbly and buttery, with pleasant herbal overtones. This pie wouldn’t have been out of place at a family picnic or Thanksgiving dinner — if not for the fact that it was packed to the rim with marijuana.
We’d decided to bake a weed-infused pie in order to do our bit for the upcoming Denver County Fair.
Inspired by Colorado’s legal-weed wave, earlier this year the fair announced it would have a pot pavilion that put a stoner spin on traditional county fair festivities, complete with Grateful Dead karaoke and a prize for the best marijuana plant. In the months leading up to the fair, the buzz around the pot component grew big enough that organizers axed a planned beer pavilion and doubled the area devoted to cannabis.

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