civic-center-mile-high-420-19-collins (1)Jacqueline Collins

Although not as hip as it once was, Facebook is still an easy place to connect with others who have similar interests such as music, sports, food and even cannabis.

Officially, the social networking giant isn’t that keen on the plant, barring any groups with the words “cannabis” or “marijuana” in their names from coming up during general searches. But if you keep looking, you’ll find Facebook communities full of hungry and creative stoners, pot growers, edibles chefs and more. Here are eight we’re fans of so far.

suenoHerbert Fuego

When you’re an adult, there’s really no upside to being sick. You either don’t get paid when you miss work, or you get paid but still have to do all the work you missed when you return. But at least being sick is a rare excuse to use nighttime cough syrup, which knocks me out as hard as cannabis ever has without completely zapping my dreams.

Research has shown a link between regular cannabis use and decreased REM sleep, or the stage of sleep when your body relaxes enough to let your mind dream. Still wanting to keep up my REM activity without totally ending the cannabis use, I hoped a strain by the name of Sueño (the Spanish word for “dream”) would bring me some good juju.

the-motet-clinic-marijuana-petrovic-2019Nina Petrovic

Members of the Motet call themselves “avid connoisseurs” of cannabis, so when the chance came to collaborate with a local dispensary, it was an easy match. Partnering with the Clinic dispensary chain, the Denver band’s input helped develop Starmatter 303, a new summer strain that’s just as loud as the funk-soul band’s tunes.

During a recent appearance at the Clinic’s Colorado Boulevard location to promote the new strain (and the band’s upcoming show at Red Rocks Amphitheatre July 11), trumpet player Parris Fleming said he’d been pushing the idea of the band having their own strain for some time.

seed-smith-grow-collins-2019 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s fluctuating marijuana prices may have found some stability, according to the latest data from the state Department of Revenue. The DOR’s official estimate for the average price per pound of marijuana flower in Colorado has risen slightly for the fourth straight time, up to $850 as of July 1.

Brendan McCormick, sales director for wholesale marijuana provider Bonsai Cultivation, believes wholesale marijuana prices are actually higher than the DOR’s estimates now that outdoor grows are done harvesting, reaching anywhere from $1,000 to $1,300 per pound.

michael-bowman-willie-nelson-hemp-flag-2013-courtesy-one-time (1)Photo courtesy of Michael Bowman

It’s been six years since Colorado native Michael Bowman pulled off a monumental coup for hemp on the Fourth of July. With the help of Jared Polis — a Colorado congressman at the time — Bowman briefly raised a Denver-made American flag above the United States Capitol Building on July 4, 2013.

That flag was made from hemp fibers, which were federally illegal at the time. Six years later, hemp is now federally legal thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill, and Bowman has co-founded his own publicly held hemp venture.

hemp-field-2013-ben-droz (1)Ben Droz

Marijuana might win Colorado points, but it’s hemp that will make the state a real winner in this game. As the country’s leader in acreage devoted to hemp farming over the past two years, Colorado has a real head start on the growing industry, and it’s Kate Greenberg’s job to keep us in the lead.

The new director of the Colorado Department of Agriculture is responsible for many things, including overseeing the state’s industrial hemp program, which churns out the plants responsible for all of those CBD products we love so much. But keeping things on course has it challenges, such as looming federal regulations and more domestic competition thanks to the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which legalized industrial hemp farming at the federal level.

To learn more about the future of hemp in Colorado, we chatted with Greenberg about her goals for the plant.

jill_ellsworth_ms_rdn_-_headshot (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Gather round the joint circle, boys and girls, we’ve got a scary story: What if we told you that joint in your hands came from a moldy jungle of Petri dish pot? Unlikely, but possible.

Believe it or not, recalls over harmful molds and yeasts have hit Colorado’s cannabis industry — and probably not at a rate that reflects the real size of the problem. The state Marijuana Enforcement Division and Department of Agriculture don’t have the resources to keep an eye on every cannabis cultivation in the state, and only a handful of city health agencies have taken it upon themselves to police the safety and health impacts of their licensed pot grows. In a twenty-month span from 2017 to 2019, the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment issued at least four separate mold recalls on cannabis grows that affected dozens of dispensaries.

balcony-west-courtesy-2019Courtesy of Balcony West

Ever want to enjoy a little weed during a smoke break? A coworking space in Denver allows tenants to just that, as long as they keep it outside.

At Balcony West, a ninth-story coworking suite in the heart of Lower Downtown, owner Phil Falco now allows tenants to smoke cannabis on the private balcony. Actually, Falco has been letting tenants do it for a while if they asked, but he just decided to let everyone know about it.

space monkeyHerbert Fuego

I must be getting old. My foot hurts for no reason, shows on Nickelodeon don’t make sense anymore, and new weed strains are just as annoying as they are intriguing. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still fun to try out the latest varieties and expand my tastebuds. However, there are a lot of new strains out there that make me regret straying from the tried and true. With Cookies and Gorilla Glue dominating dispensary shelves, sometimes I wonder how different these “new” cuts really are.

That was my thought when I saw Space Monkey, which has showed up at Colorado dispensaries within the last year or so.

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