img_0018_1_Lauren Antonoff

Building gingerbread houses in elementary school usually involved fastening stale cookies to a milk carton, gluing some gumdrops and mints onto your uneven shack with frosting, and watching Frosty the Snowman for the 23rd time. Wasn’t it the best?

Forgetting the fun, childlike traditions of the holidays is a quick way to become a Grinch. In an effort to preserve the holiday spirit during such tough times, we decided to infuse a gingerbread house with about as much weed as we could.

There are two ways to approach this — or three, if you have enough money and really want to be home for Christmas this year: Infuse the gingerbread, decorate a normal gingerbread house with edibles, or both. Check out our ganjabread building effort below. Merry Loudmas!

the_coffee_joint_ice_cream_collins20180705_017Jacqueline Collins

The Coffee Joint, the first establishment to hold a cannabis consumption license in Denver, is now the second pot lounge business to apply for a state social consumption license.

Colorado Springs social lounge Studio A64 successfully applied for a social consumption license at the state Marijuana Enforcement Division office three hours before Coffee Joint owners Rita Tsalyuk and Kirill Merkulov could beat them to it.

Studio A64 could not be reached for comment, but Tsalyuk and Merkulov say the opportunity to apply for a state license is a big step for all cannabis businesses. “This is bigger than us. It’s just a bigger step in the industry,” Tsalyuk explains. “It opens the door to do something different and plan ahead for the next year.”

nfl_kickoff_8sept_2016_36_of_78_Brandon Marshall

Songwriter and OneRepublic frontman Ryan Tedder has joined the throngs of musicians – from Willie Nelson to Nathaniel Rateliff – who are getting into the cannabis, CBD and hemp fields.

But instead of launching a strain named after himself, Tedder is putting out an “all-new hemp extract sparkling water” called Mad Tasty that promises to bring “wellness to the masses in the tastiest way yet.”

screen_shot_2019-12-18_at_11.12.28_amDenver Police Department

A string of armed robberies at Denver-area marijuana dispensaries over the past two months continued into this week, according to the Denver Police Department, with the latest stickup taking place at one of Colorado’s largest dispensary chains.

Armed robbers barged into a Native Roots location near Denver International Airport on North Tower Road on Monday, December 16, demanding cash from an employee, according to the DPD and Native Roots. Police officials say it’s the sixth armed-robbery attempt at a Denver-area dispensary since early November, and they believe the crimes are connected to the same group of suspects.

veritas_farm_collins20190807_011Jacqueline Collins

Many American farmers were handed seeds of opportunity in October, when the United States Department of Agriculture released its much-anticipated regulations for farming hemp. The new federal rules came nearly a year after Congress legalized hemp farming, and almost half a decade after the Colorado Department of Agriculture established its own program for farming hemp. And this state’s rules don’t exactly line up with the ones just announced by the feds.

Two years after voters approved Amendment 64, legalizing recreational marijuana, Colorado decided to opt into the 2014 Farm Bill, a federal law that allowed states to create pilot programs for hemp licensing. As a result, Colorado is now one of the largest producers of hemp in the country. While every Colorado farmer growing hemp will probably have to change a few things once the federal regulations take hold, those same regulations also bring credibility to an industry essentially stuck in a federal gray area, according to Corey Cox, an attorney with Vicente Sederberg who represents clients in Colorado’s hemp industry.

cbd-sign-aurora-petrovic-2019Nina Petrovic

Driving around the residential streets of Colorado, you might see signs that look like they’re about to announce a garage sale but instead are advertising hemp or CBD oil. Like the homemade one pictured here, on Iliff Avenue in Aurora, hawking 1,444 milligrams of CBD oil for $60.

“There’s a lot of concern, or growing concern, as we see a lot of the CBD market grow and grow,” says Hollis Glenn, director of the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s inspection and consumer services. “You see CBD being sold in places like gas stations, and the industry is so new that there’s no directive on how it should be manufactured.”

honey_pot_lounge_collins20190407_033 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado dispensaries will almost certainly break another annual sales record for the fifth straight year since recreational weed stores first opened for business on January 1, 2014.

According to data from the state Department of Revenue, Colorado dispensaries accounted for just under $150.5 million in sales in October. Recreational pot sales came in just over $121.2 million, while medical marijuana accounted for approximately $29.2 million.

While that figure is lower than the month before, it reflects what’s become a standard seasonal decline in pot sales. It also all but locks up 2019’s rise past 2018 to tally the most marijuana sales dollars in a calendar year.

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